An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to 2022 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15826 entries, 13745 authors and 1921 subjects. Updated: December 1, 2022

IBN BUTLĀN, Abuʾl-Ḥasan Al-Mukhtār Ibn ʿAbdūn Ibn SaʿDūn. ابو الحسن المختار ابن عبدون ابن بطلان (Elluchasem Elimithar)

2 entries
  • 7627

Tacuini sanitatis Elluchasem Elimithar Medici de Baldath, de sex rebus non naturalibus, earum naturis, operationibus, & rectificationibus, publico omnium usui, conseruandae sanitatis, recens exarati. Albengnefit De uirtutibus medicinarum, & ciborum. Iac. Alkindus De rerum gradibus.

Strasbourg, France: apud Ioannem Schottum librarium, 1531.

A Christian physician of Baghdad, Ibn Butlān traveled widely, eventually settling in Antioch. His treatise on hygiene and dietetics, Taqwām al-sihhah (The Almanac of Health) presented a guide to medical regimen in tabular form. It was probably the best-known of his treatises. The first edition in print includes 40 large woodcut borders by Hans Weiditz illustrating plants, animals, fruits, humors, diseases and cookery at the foot of page openings. Albengnefit (Ibn al-Wafid) was a pharmacist and physician of Toledo, where at one time he served as Vizier. He was noted for his rational methods of treatment, preferring to treat by diet, or, when necessary, by simple botanical remedies. This is one of his best known works, dealing with the properties of medicines and beverages. Al-Kindi’s work is on the preparation and dosage of medicines. In it he attempted to apply mathematics to pharmacology by quantifying the strength of drugs. Prioreschi called this the first attempt at serious quantification in medicine.[2] Al-Kindi also developed a system, based on the phases of the moon, that would allow a doctor to determine in advance the most critical days of a patient's illness.[3] De Gradibus was translated into Latin by Gerard of Cremona in the 12th century.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COMPUTING/MATHEMATICS in Medicine & Biology, Hygiene, ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, Illustration, Medical, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, NUTRITION / DIET, PHARMACOLOGY, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS
  • 12675

The medico-philosophical controversy between Ibn Butlan of Baghdad and Ibn Ridwan of Cairo: A contribution to the history of Greek learning among the Arabs. (The Egyptian University, the Faculty of Arts: Publication 13.)

Cairo: The Egyptian University, 1937.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic, ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE › History of Islamic or Arab Medicine