An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15475 entries, 13329 authors and 1903 subjects. Updated: December 3, 2021

HALLER, John S., Jr.

12 entries
  • 9469

Outcasts from evolution: Scientific attitudes of racial inferiority, 1859 - 1900.

Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1971.


Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › History of Anthropology, EVOLUTION › History of Evolutionary Thought
  • 9411

The physician and sexuality in Victorian America.

Urbana-Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1974.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , SEXUALITY / Sexology › History of Sexuality / Sexology
  • 6596.5

American medicine in transition, 1840-1910.

Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1981.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States
  • 11533

Medical thermometry--a short history.

West. J. Med., 142, 108-116, 1985.

Available from PubMedCentral at this link.



Subjects: INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › History of Biomedical Instrumentation, INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › Medical Instruments › Thermometer
  • 9410

Farmcarts to Fords: A history of the military ambulance, 1790-1925.

Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1992.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine
  • 10128

Battlefield medicine: A history of the military ambulance from the Napoleonic wars through World War I.

Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1992.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Napoleon's Campaigns & Wars, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I
  • 9409

Medical protestants: The Eclectics in American medicine, 1825-1939.

Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1994.

The first modern history of the Eclectic school of American sectarian medicine.

"The Eclectic school (sometimes called the "American School") flourished in the mid-nineteenth century when the art and science of medicine was undergoing a profound crisis of faith. At the heart of the crisis was a disillusionment with the traditional therapeutics of the day and an intense questioning of the principles and philosophy upon which medicine had been built. Many American physicians and their patients felt that medicine had lost the ability to cure. The Eclectics surmounted the crisis by forging a therapeutics based on herbal remedies and an empirical approach to disease, a system independent of the influence of European practices.

"Although rejected by the Regulars (adherents of mainstream medicine), the Eclectics imitated their magisterial manner, establishing two dozen colleges and more than sixty-five journals to proclaim the wisdom of their theory. Central to the story of Eclecticism is that of the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, the "mother institute" of reform medical colleges. Organized in 1845, the school was to exist for ninety-four years before closing in 1939.

"Throughout much of their history, the Eclectic medical schools provided an avenue into the medical profession for men and women who lacked the financial and educational opportunities the Regular schools required, siding with Professor Martyn Paine of the Medical Department of New York University, who, in 1846, had accused the newly formed American Medical Association of playing aristocratic politics behind a masquerade of curriculum reform. Eventually, though, they grudgingly followed the lead of the Regulars by changing their curriculum and tightening admission standards" (publisher)

 



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession
  • 9407

Kindly medicine: Physio-medicalism in America, 1836-1911.

Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1997.

"Between 1836 and 1911, thirteen physio-medical colleges opened, and then closed, their doors. These authentic American schools, founded on a philosophy of so-called Physio-Medicalism, substituted botanical medicines for allopathy's mineral drugs and promoted the belief that the human body has an inherent "vital force" that can be used to heal. In Kindly Medicine, John Haller offers the first complete history of this high-brow branch of botanical medicine. Physio-Medicalist, along with Thomsonians, Homeopathys, Hydropaths, and Eclectics, represented the earliest wave of medical sectarianism in nineteenth-century America. United in their opposition to the harsh regimens of allopathy, or regular medicine, these sects had their beginnings in the era of Jacksonian democracy and individualism when every man yearned to become his own legislator, minister, and even his own physician. The Physio-Medicals demanded equal rights with regular practitioners to jobs in the army, navy and public institutions and equal representation on the new state licensing and regulatory boards. As the nineteenth century drew to a close, they saw their influence waning as they could no longer match allopathy's increasing hold on science and on the public's trust" (publisher).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession
  • 9408

The people's doctors: Samuel Thomson and the American Botanical Movement 1790-1860.

Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 2001.

"Samuel Thomson, born in New Hampshire in 1769 to an illiterate farming family, had no formal education, but he learned the elements of botanical medicine from a "root doctor," who he met in his youth. Thomson sought to release patients from the harsh bleeding or purging regimens of regular physicians by offering inexpensive and gentle medicines from their own fields and gardens. He melded his followers into a militant corps of dedicated believers, using them to successfully lobby state legislatures to pass medical acts favorable to their cause.

 "John S. Haller Jr. points out that Thomson began his studies by ministering to his own family. He started his professional career as an itinerant healer traveling a circuit among the small towns and villages of Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts. Eventually, he transformed his medical practice into a successful business enterprise with agents selling several hundred thousand rights or franchises to his system. His popular New Guide to Health (1822) went through thirteen editions, including one in German, and countless thousands were reprinted without permission.

"Told here for the first time, Haller's history of Thomsonism recounts the division within this American medical sect in the last century. While many Thomsonians displayed a powerful, vested interest in anti-intellectualism, a growing number found respectability through the establishment of medical colleges and a certified profession of botanical doctors." (publisher)

 



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northeast, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines › History of Materia Medica, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine
  • 9406

The history of American homeopathy: The academic years, 1820-1935.

Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2005.


Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Homeopathy › History of Homeopathy, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States
  • 9405

The history of American homeopathy: From rational medicine to holistic health care.

Rutherford, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2013.


Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Homeopathy › History of Homeopathy, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States
  • 9412

Shadow medicine: The placebo in conventional and alternative therapies.

New York: Columbia University Press, 2014.


Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › History of Alternative Medicine in General, PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE › Placebo / Nocebo