An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15470 entries, 13325 authors and 1902 subjects. Updated: November 27, 2021

CAREY, Mathew

1 entries
  • 5451

A short account of the malignant fever, lately prevalent in Philadelphia: With a statement of the proceedings that took place on the subject in different parts of the United States.

Philadelphia: The Author, 1793.

Carey was a Philadelphia publisher and economist rather than a physician. In this little book, which passed through four editions in a few months, Carey left a graphic description of the great yellow fever epidemic of Philadelphia in 1793, which infected about 17,000 people and left 5000 people dead, out of a population estimated at 45,000-50,000. Carey gave a good clinical description of the disease, mentioning the efficacy and the failure of many forms of treatment. Regrettably Carey accused blacks of causing the epidemic and of taking advantage of victims while acting as nurses. Wide distribution of the pamphlet contributed to fears and hostility in the city in which members of the Free African Society had risked their lives as nurses and aides to the sick and dying. Digital facsimile of the third edition, 1793, from the Internet Archive at this link.

To the fourth edition of January 16, 1794 Carey appended the following: "Acounts of the plague in London and Marseilles; and a list of the dead, from August 1, to the middle of December, 1793." Digital facsimile of the 4th edition from the Internet Archive at this link.

 



Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Pennsylvania