An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to 2022 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15791 entries, 13704 authors and 1919 subjects. Updated: September 13, 2022

UNDERHILL, Ruth Murray

1 entries
  • 9303

The ethnobiology of the Papago Indians. Ethnological Studies in the American Southwest II.

University of New Mexico Bulletin, Biological Series, 4, No. 3, 1-84, 1935.

"The Tohono O’odham ... are a Native American people of the Sonoran Desert, residing primarily in the U.S. state of Arizona and the Mexican state of SonoraTohono O’odham means "Desert People." The federally recognized tribe is known as the Tohono O'odham Nation.

"The Tohono O’odham have rejected the former name Papago, used by Europeans after being adopted by Spanish conquistadores from hearing other Piman bands call them this. The Pima were competitors and referred to the people as Ba꞉bawĭkoʼa meaning "eating tepary beans." That word was pronounced papago by the Spanish and adopted by later English speakers" (Wikipedia article on Tohono O'odham, accessed 03-2017). 

Digital facsimile of the 1935 work from the University of New Mexico at this link.



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Ethnobiology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, NATIVE AMERICANS & Medicine, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › New Mexico