An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to 2022 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15791 entries, 13704 authors and 1919 subjects. Updated: September 13, 2022

WILSON, Sir William James Erasmus

6 entries
  • 13299

A series of anatomical plates. 5 vols.: The muscles of the human body. The vessels of the human body. The nerves of the human body. The viscera of the human body. The bones and ligaments of the human body.

London, 18361842.


Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century
  • 13300

A series of anatomical plates. 5 vols.: The muscles of the human body. The vessels of the human body. The nerves of the human body. The viscera of the human body. The bones and ligaments of the human body.

London: Taylor & Walton, 18361842.

The most ambitious 19th century English anatomy illustrated by lithography. Some copies were issued with hand-colored plates.  The five volumes, containing a total of 201 plates, describe the muscles, blood vessels, nerves, viscera, and bones and ligaments. Wilson designed the plates for this work, and signed some of them, but the plates were actually drawn by other artists, including J. Walsh and William Bagg, a portrait painter in London. Wilson also co-edited the second through fifth volumes. The section on the anatomy of the nerves is especially notable, with thirty-eight plates, including ten elegant colored plates of the brain and spinal cord, and a stunning colored plate showing the distribution of the eighth pair of nerves.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, ANATOMY › Anatomical Illustration, ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy › Cytoarchitecture
  • 9921

Portraits of diseases of the skin.

London: John Churchill, 1855.

Wilson's atlas, with 48 plates drawn and engraved by the medical artist, William Bagg, was the first English large folio atlas of dermatology in the style of similar folios issued in France by Alibert and Cazenave. The plates are classified under “General diseases,” “Syphilitic eruptions,” “Disordered chromatogenous function,” “Diseases of the sebiparous glands,” “Diseases of the hair follicles,” and “Specific diseases,” this last category containing illustrations of kelis (keloid), lupus and syphiloderma. 



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Syphilis
  • 10049

The eastern, or Turkish bath: Its history, revival in Britain, and application to the purposes of health.

London: John Churchill, 1861.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Turkey, THERAPEUTICS › Balneotherapy, THERAPEUTICS › Hydrotherapy
  • 4061

On dermatitis exfoliativa.

Med. Times Gaz. 1, 118-20, 1870.

Although Hippocrates mentioned this condition, Erasmus Wilson first named it and described it as we know it today. It has been called “Wilson’s disease”; an eponym discarded since its use to describe the progressive lenticular degeneration of Kinnier Wilson.



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY › Specific Dermatoses
  • 3994

Lectures on dermatology. 4 vols.

London: J. & A. Churchill, 18711878.

Erasmus Wilson gave the original descriptions of several cutaneous diseases, and made a fine collection of dermatological preparations. He classified skin diseases on an anatomical basis. The above book consists of his lectures at the Royal College of Surgeons, at which institution he founded a chair of dermatology.



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY