An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15426 entries, 13280 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 20, 2021

AVICENNA, [Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥusayn ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn Al-Hasan ibn Ali ibn Sīnā]

14 entries
  • 43

Canon medicinae [Latin] (Lib I-V) (Tr: Gerardus Cremonensis) (5 vols.)

Milan: Philippus de Lavagnia, [for Johannes Antonius & Blasius de Terzago], 1473.

Avicenna is said to have written more than 100 books, most of which have perished. He wrote on the etiology of epilepsy and described diabetes, noticing the sweetish taste of the urine. His Canon is one of the most famous medical texts ever written; a complete exposition of Galenism. Neuburger says: “It stands for the epitome of all precedent development, the final codification of all Graeco-Arabic medicine”. It dominated the medical schools of Europe and Asia for five centuries. The above is a Latin translation by Gerard of Cremona.  ISTC no. ia01417500ISTC no.  ia01417700 describes another printing of the same translation issued in Strassburg by Adolf Rusch (the R printer), also in 1473. Digital facsimiles of all five volumes of that edition are available from the Bayerische StaatsBibliothek; volume 1 at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Iran (Persia), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine, Metabolism & Metabolic Disorders › Diabetes
  • 9145

Expositio in primam et secundam fen primi Canonis Avicennae by Hugo Senensis. Edited by Antonius Cittadinus Faventinus. With: Quaestio de febre by Antonius Cittadinus.

Ferrara: Andreas Belfortis, Gallus, 1491.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE
  • 8344

[Vol. 1:] Primus Avi. Canon. Avicenna, medicorum principis, Canonum liber (translatus a Gerardo Cremonensi), una cum lucidissima Gentilis Fulgi. expositione, qui merito is Speculator appellatus, additis annotationibus omnium auctoritatum and priscorum and recentiorum auctorum (edente Barthomomeo Tantuccio) .... - [Vol. 2:] Secundus Canon Avic., Cum exquisitissima Gentilis Fulg. expositione. Demum Plinii auctoritates, secundum annotata capita in de Simplicibus nuperrime addite. - [Vol.3:] Tertius Can. Avic., Cum amplissima Gentilis Fulgi. expositione. Demum commentaria nuper addita, videlicet Jacobi de Partibus super "Fen" VI and XIIII. Item Jo. Matthei de Gradi super "Fen" XXII, quia Gentilis in eis defecit. - [Vol. 4:]: Secunda pars Gentilis super tertio Avic. Cum supplementis Jacobi de Partibus, Parisiensis, ac Joannis Matthei de Gradi, Mediolanensis, ubi Gentilis vel breviter vel tacite pertransivit. - [Vol.5:] Quartus Canon Avicenna, cum preclara Gentilis Fulginatis exhibits. Thadei item Florentini expositio super secunda "Fen" ejusdem. Gentilis Florentini iterum super duos primos tractatus quinte "Fen". Quintus etiam Canon, cum ejusdem Gentilis Fulginatis lucidissima exhibits. Canticorum liber, cum commento Averroys, translatus ex arabico a magistro Armegando Blasii, Libellus de Viribus cordis translatus ab Arnaldo de Villanova). Omnia accuratissime revisa atque castigata ....

Venice: apud heredes O. Scoti, 15201522.

The commentary by Gentile da Foligno upon Avicenna's Canon was among the most influential medical texts of the Later Middle Ages. See Roger K. French, Canonical medicine: Gentile da Foligno and scholasticism (Leiden: Brill, 2001).



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 7202

Avicenne liber canonis medicinae. Cum castigationibus Andree Bellunensis.

Venice: Luc-Antonio Giunta, 1527.

Revised and improved text of the Canon and other works of Avicenna by Andrea Alpago of Belluno, who had acquired a deep understanding of both the language and the subject during his thirty years of service as physician to the Venetian embassy at Damascus. Alpago supplied emendations derived from Arabic manuscripts to the earlier Latin editions of the Canon, the Cantica, and De viribus cordis (which he more accurately entitled De medicamentis cordialibus), and compiled a new glossary, mainly of Arabic names of drugs. His corrections were first published posthumously by his nephew Paolo in the Giunta edition of 1527. Digital facsimile of the 1544 Giunta edition edited by Alpago from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Iran (Persia), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 44

Kitāb al-Qānūn fial-ţibb. [Libri V Canonis medicinae.]

Rome: In typ. Medicea, 1593.

Title transliterated. Text and title page (except imprint) are in Arabic. This is the first printing of the text in Arabic of Book V of al-Qānūn. See also S. M. Afnan, Avicenna, his life and works. London, 1958.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Iran (Persia), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 8824

Die Augenheilkunde des Ibn Sina aus dem Arabischen Übersetzt und Erläutert.

Leipzig: Verlag von Veit, 1902.

Translation of Book III, Fan III of Avicenna's Canon pertaining to the eye and its diseases. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine, OPHTHALMOLOGY › History of Ophthalmology
  • 8363

Trois traités d'anatomie arabes par Muhammad ibn Zakariyya al-Razi, 'Ali ibn al-'Abbas, et 'Ali ibn Sina. Text inédit de deux traités. Traduction de P. de Koning.

Leiden: Brill, 1903.

Parallel Arabic and French texts. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Medieval Anatomy (6th to 15th Centuries), ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 45

A treatise on the Canon of Medicine incorporating a translation of the First Book. By O.C. Gruner.

London: Luzac, 1930.

This translation of Book I of the Canon accompanied by a large number of valuable notes and comments on the text, which bring out the close connection between Arabic and Chinese medicine, and the influence which Avicenna had upon many medieval scholars. A translation direct from Arabic into English by H. A. Hameed et al. was published in New Delhi, 1970.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Iran (Persia), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine, Medicine: General Works
  • 13155

Avicenna's psychology: An English translation of Kitāb Al-najāt, Book II, Chapter VI, with historico-philosophical notes and textual improvements on the Cairo edition. By F. Rahman.

London: Oxford University Press, 1952.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine, PSYCHOLOGY
  • 12518

Avicenne, Poème de la médecine, Urgūza fi' t-tibb, Cantica Avicennae.

Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1956.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 13156

Avicenna's De anima (Arabic text) being the psychological part of Kitāb al-Shifā'. Edited by R. Rahman.

London & New York: Oxford University Press, 1959.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine, PSYCHOLOGY
  • 10936

The Canon of Medicine (al-Qānūn fi'l-tibb). Adapted by Laleh Bakhtiar from translations of Volume 1 by O. Cameron Gruner and Mazar H. Shah. Correlated with the Arabic by Jay R. Crook with notes by O. Cameron Gruner.

Chicago, IL: KAZI Publications, Inc. , 1999.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 8823

Avicenna's medicine: A new translation of the 11th-century Canon with practical applications for integrative health care.

Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 2013.

A new translation of volume one of Avicenna's Qānūn (Canon), directly from the original Arabic.



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 10627

Avicenne et la médecine en Italie. Le Canon dans les universités (1200-1350).

Paris: Honoré Champion, 2017.


Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, Persian (Iranian) Islamic Medicine › History of Persian (Iranian) Islamic Medicine