An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15429 entries, 13282 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 23, 2021

AVENZOAR [Ibn Zuhr (Arabic: ابن زهر‎ ]

5 entries
  • 47

Liber Teisir, sive rectificatio medicationis et regiminis. Antidotarium. Translated from Arabic into Hebrew by Jacobus Hebraeus; into Latin by Paravicius. Add: Averroes: Colliget.

Venice: Johannes and Gregorius de Gregoriis, de Forlivio, 1490.

This is a Latin translation from a Hebrew version dating from 1280. Avenzoar, the greatest Muslim physician of the Western Caliphate, described the itch-mite, Sarcoptes scabiei, serous pericarditis, mediastinal abscess, pharyngeal paralysis and otitis media. He was the first to attempt total extirpation of the uterus. He anticipated the modern stomach tube and advocated rectal feeding. He carefully described, but did not perform, lithotomy, and was apparently the first to mention a lithotrite. Avenzoar's text was translated from the Arabic by Jacob probably into the Venetian vernacular, from which it was translated into Latin by Paduan physician Paravicius in 1281. ISTC no. ia01408000. Digital facsimile from the Bayerische StaatsBibliothek at this link.



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, Medicine: General Works, PARASITOLOGY › Sarcoptes scabiei (Itch-Mite), PHARMACOLOGY, SURGERY: General , UROLOGY
  • 39.1

Rhazes: Liber ad Almansorem sive Tractatus medicinae I-X. Liber divisionum. De aegritudinibus juncturarum. De aegritudinibus puerorum. De secretis sive aphorismi. Antidotarium. De praeservatione ab aegritudine lapidis; Introductorium medicinae. De sectionibus et ventosis. Synonyma. De animalibus. Add:Tabula de herbis medicis; Maimonides: Aphorismi; Mesue (the elder): Aphorismi; Hippocrates: Secreta; Prognosticatio secundum lunam; Capsula eburnea; De humana natura; De aere et aqua et regionibus; De pharmaciis; De insomniis; Avenzohar: De cura lapidis.

Venice: Bonetus Locatellus, for Octavianus Scotus, 1497.

The best edition of the Opuscula of Rhazes, containing the second printing of the celebrated Liber ad Almansorem, not to be confused with Liber nonus ad Almansorem, as well as De aegritudine puerorum (No. 6313), and other works by Rhazes. This edition also contains the first edition of Rhazes’ De proprietatibus membrorum et nocumentis sexaginta animalium

The Liber ad Almansorem first appeared in its entirety in 1481 with 14 other titles, including the first printed edition of Hippocrates On Airs, Waters, and Places, a pioneering work in anthropology. When republished in 1497, additional works by Rhazes, Maimonides and Avenzoar were included for a total of 23 separate titles. (Works by Hippocrates, Mesue, and Maimonides also included here were previously published in 1489, a later edition of which was issued in 1500, and 1508.)  ISTC No. ir00176000. Digital facsimile from the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek at this ink



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, ANTHROPOLOGY, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 53

Aphorismi secundum doctrinam Galeni. Add: Johannes Damascenus [Mesue?]: Aphorismi. Hippocrates: Secreta; Prognosticatio secundum lunam; Capsula eburnea; De humana natura; De aere et aqua et regionibus; De pharmaciis; De insomniis. Avenzohar: De curatione lapidis.

Venice: Johannes Hammon, 1500.

An edition of the Latin translation of Maimonides’ Aphorismi (first published, Venice, 1489), together with a compilation of the works of Mesue, Avenzoar, Galen, etc. Page for page reprint, Venice, 1508. See No. 6495.7. ISTC No. im00078000.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, Jews and Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Jewish Medicine, Medicine: General Works
  • 8344

[Vol. 1:] Primus Avi. Canon. Avicenna, medicorum principis, Canonum liber (translatus a Gerardo Cremonensi), una cum lucidissima Gentilis Fulgi. expositione, qui merito is Speculator appellatus, additis annotationibus omnium auctoritatum and priscorum and recentiorum auctorum (edente Barthomomeo Tantuccio) .... - [Vol. 2:] Secundus Canon Avic., Cum exquisitissima Gentilis Fulg. expositione. Demum Plinii auctoritates, secundum annotata capita in de Simplicibus nuperrime addite. - [Vol.3:] Tertius Can. Avic., Cum amplissima Gentilis Fulgi. expositione. Demum commentaria nuper addita, videlicet Jacobi de Partibus super "Fen" VI and XIIII. Item Jo. Matthei de Gradi super "Fen" XXII, quia Gentilis in eis defecit. - [Vol. 4:]: Secunda pars Gentilis super tertio Avic. Cum supplementis Jacobi de Partibus, Parisiensis, ac Joannis Matthei de Gradi, Mediolanensis, ubi Gentilis vel breviter vel tacite pertransivit. - [Vol.5:] Quartus Canon Avicenna, cum preclara Gentilis Fulginatis exhibits. Thadei item Florentini expositio super secunda "Fen" ejusdem. Gentilis Florentini iterum super duos primos tractatus quinte "Fen". Quintus etiam Canon, cum ejusdem Gentilis Fulginatis lucidissima exhibits. Canticorum liber, cum commento Averroys, translatus ex arabico a magistro Armegando Blasii, Libellus de Viribus cordis translatus ab Arnaldo de Villanova). Omnia accuratissime revisa atque castigata ....

Venice: apud heredes O. Scoti, 15201522.

The commentary by Gentile da Foligno upon Avicenna's Canon was among the most influential medical texts of the Later Middle Ages. See Roger K. French, Canonical medicine: Gentile da Foligno and scholasticism (Leiden: Brill, 2001).



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 12778

The Regimen Sanitatis of Avenzoar: Stages in the production of a medieval translation.

Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2019.

"The authors publish a previously unedited Regimen of Health attributed to Avenzoar (Ibn Zuhr), translated at Montpellier in 1299 in a collaboration between a Jewish philosopher and a Christian surgeon, the former translating the original Arabic into their shared Occitan vernacular, the latter translating that into Latin. They use manuscript evidence to argue that the text was produced in two stages, first a quite literal version, then a revision improved in style and in language adapted to contemporary European medicine. Such collaborative translations are well known, but the revelation of the inner workings of the translation process in this case is exceptional. A separate Hebrew translation by the philosopher (also edited here) gives independent evidence of the lost Arabic original" (publisher).



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Jewish Medicine