An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15423 entries, 13280 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 17, 2021

Browse by Entry Number 10200–10299

100 entries
  • 10200

Topographische Anatomie des Menschen. Lehrbuch und Atlas der regionär-stratigraphischen Präparation. 4 vols. in 7. Vol. 1 in 2 pts: Brust un Brustgliedmasse, 1937; Vol. 2 in 2 pts: Bauch, Becken und Beckengliedmasse, 1941; Vol. 3: Der Hals, 1952; Vol. 4 in 2 pts: Topographische und stratigraphischen Anatomie des Kopfes, 1957, 1960.

Vienna & Berlin & Innsbruck, Munich: Urban & Schwarzenberg, 19371960.

Pernkopf's anatomy is remarkable for the intricacy of its detailed images and its "regional stratigraphic" approach, i.e. "multiple layers of dissection with an emphasis on fascia shown and reflected, approaching the subject from superficial to deep dissection in great detail" (Hildebrandt). An Austrian professor of anatomy, Pernkopf joined the Sturmabteilung or Storm Troopers in 1933, and promoted Nazi racial hygiene and antisemitism as dean of the University of Vienna Medical School. As a result 77% of the faculty, including all Jews and three Nobel laureates, were dismissed.

Though Pernkopf's anatomical atlas remains in many ways unsurpassed, it is likely that at least some of the cadavers used for dissections were those of executed prisoners, including Jews. In the early German editions the artists incorporated swastikas and SS insignias into their signatures. By the time the book was published internationally some of the Nazi symbols had been airbrushed out, and the medical community was so enthralled with the illustrations that few bothered to consider their origins or Pernkopf’s past. In their review of the 1963 edition, The Annals of Internal Medicine said it was “magnificently conceived and a finely printed book.” The Lancet wrote “most of the illustrations are outstanding works of art.... it should be in every medical school library.” As late as 1990 JAMA said that it was “a classic among atlases... [and] for all those who have an interest and appreciation of anatomical illustration, and the wherewithal to afford it, this atlas is one of the best” (http://www.codex99.com/anatomy/93.html). A condensed two-volume edition was published in English as Atlas of topographical and applied human anatomy (Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders, 1963) and was eventually translated into several languages. Updated editions were published in 1980 and 1988. See Sabine Hildebrandt, "How the Pernkopf controversy facilitated a historical and ethical analysis of the anatomical sciences in Austria and Germany: A recommendation for the continued use of the Pernkopf atlas," Clinical Anatomy, 19 (2006), 91-100.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 20th Century, ANATOMY › Anatomical Illustration, ANATOMY › Topographical Anatomy, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Austria, Ethics, Biomedical
  • 10201

The Visible Human Project.

Bethesda, MD: U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1986.

https://www.nlm.nih.gov/research/visible/visible_human.html

"The Visible Human Project® is an outgrowth of the NLM's 1986 Long-Range Plan. It is the creation of complete, anatomically detailed, three-dimensional representations of the normal male and female human bodies. Acquisition of transverse CT, MR and cryosection images of representative male and female cadavers has been completed. The male was sectioned at one millimeter intervals, the female at one-third of a millimeter intervals.

"The long-term goal of the Visible Human Project® is to produce a system of knowledge structures that will transparently link visual knowledge forms to symbolic knowledge formats such as the names of body parts.

"The National Library of Medicine thanks the men and the women who will their body to science, thereby enabling medical research and development.

Further Information

 

 



Subjects: ANATOMY › 20th Century, ANATOMY › 21st Century, ANATOMY › Anatomical Illustration › Computer Graphics, COMPUTING/MATHEMATICS in Medicine & Biology, DIGITAL RESOURCES › Digital Archives & Libraries
  • 10202

Max Brödel, The man who put art into medicine. By Ranice W. Crosby and John Cody.

New York: Springer, 1991.

In the late 1890s, Brödel was brought to the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine  to illustrate for Harvey Cushing, William Halsted, Howard Kelly, and other notable clinicians. Besides creating a prolific amount of work Brödel developed new artistic techniques, such as the carbon dust technique, that helped advance the quality and accuracy of medical illustrations. In 1911 he presided over the creation of the first Department of Art as Applied to Medicine for training other medical illustrators at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, remaining director of this department until 1939.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 20th Century, BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Biographies of Individuals, Illustration, Biomedical, Illustration, Medical
  • 10203

Ciba collection of medical illustrations. 8 vols. in 13.

Summit, NJ & Ardley, NY: Ciba Pharmaceutical Products, Inc., 19531990.

"In all, Netter produced nearly 4,000 illustrations, which have been included in countless publications. In perspective, that number represents an image researched, sketched, and completely painted for every three business days for over 50 years.

"The vast bulk of Netter's illustrations were produced for and owned by CIBA Pharmaceutical Company and its successor, CIBA-Geigy, which has since merged with Sandoz Laboratories to become Novartis. In June 2000, Novartis sold its interest in Netter's works to MediMedia USA's subsidiary Icon Learning Systems, which in turn has sold the portfolio to Elsevier, which continues to make his work available in various formats. His Atlas of Human Anatomy and other atlases have become a staple of medical education" (Wikipedia article on Frank H. Netter, accessed 04-2018).

The volumes and the dates of their first printings are listed below:

Vol. 1: Nervous system, with a supplement on the hypothalamus. With foreward by John F. Fulton (1953).

Vol. 1, pt. 1: Anatomy and physiology (1983).

Vol. 1, pt. 2:  Nervous system, Part II (2), Neurologic and neuromuscular disorders (1986).

Vol. 2:  Reproductive system. Edited by Ernest Oppenheim. With foreward by John Rock ( 1954).

Vol. 3, pt. 1: Upper digestive tract (1959).

Vol. 3, pt. 2. Lower digestive tract (1962).

Vol. 3, pt. 3. Liver, biliary tract and pancreas, with a supplement on new aspects of structure, metabolism, diagnostic and surgical procedures (1957).

Vol. 4: Endocrine system and selected metabolic diseases (1965).

Vol. 5: Heart (1969).

Vol. 6: Kidneys, ureters, and urinary bladder (1973).

Vol. 7: Respiratory system (1979).

Vol. 8: Musculoskeletal system—pt. 1. Anatomy, physiology, and metabolic disorders (1987).

Vol. 8, pt. 2: Developmental disorders, tumors, rheumatic diseases, and joint replacement (1990).

 

 



Subjects: ANATOMY › 20th Century, ANATOMY › Anatomical Illustration
  • 10204

The Ciba collection of medical illustrations. A compilation of pathological and anatomical paintings prepared by Frank H. Netter, M.D.

Summit, NJ: Ciba Pharmaceutical Products, Inc., 1948.

This was the first collection of anatomical images by Netter published in book form.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 20th Century, ANATOMY › Anatomical Illustration
  • 10205

Atlas of human anatomy, with explanatory text by Jesse Feiring Williams...colored illustrations by Franz Frohse, Max Brödel and Leon Schlossberg.

New York: Barnes & Noble, 1935.

Reproduced Frohse's anatomical charts in much reduced form with supplementary charts added by Brödel and Schlossberg of Johns Hopkins.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 20th Century
  • 10206

American Frohse anatomical charts. Edited, revised and augmented by Max Brödel. With: A key to the Frohse anatomical charts.

Chicago, IL: A. J. Nystrom & Co., 19191922.

10 wall charts, each 42 x 64 inches, comprising a total of 76 colored illustrations life size or larger.

Chart 1: Human Skeleton

Chart 2: Muscles, front and back

Chart 3: Nervous and Circulatory Systems

Chart 4: a Schematic diagram of circulation, b: Heart and blook vessels, c: Skin

Chart 5: Eye and Ear

Chart 6: a,b,c,d Viscera of Chest and Abodomen

Chart 7:  Head, mouth and throat in five drawings

Chart 8: Digestive System

Chart 9:Endocrine Glands 

Chart 10: Male: and Female genito Urinary Organs 

This set was originally supplied on rollers in an oak display case.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 20th Century
  • 10207

Catalogue of anatomical models, charts and osteological preparations. Auzoux's papier mache anatomical models, Bocksteger models painted in natural colors, human skeletons.

Philadelphia: James W. Queen & Co., 1886.

One of the better illustrated American trade catalogues of the period describing available anatomical models, charts, skeletons for use in teaching. Reprinted, along with several other catalogues relating to instrumentation in The Queen Catalogues. With a new introduction by Deborah Jean Warner. 2 vols. San Francisco: Norman Publishing, 1993.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century
  • 10208

Serial publications containing medical classics. An index to citations in Garrison/Morton (3rd edition, 1970). Compiled by Lee Ash in collaboration with Michael A. Murray. 2nd edition, revised & enlarged.

Bethany, CT, 1979.

An index to periodical citations in the 1970 printed edition of this bibliography. It is, however, still useful for references to 19th century, early 20th century, and earlier citations.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Periodicals
  • 10209

Offenses against one's self. Edited by Louis Crompton.

Journal of Homosexuality, 3 (4) 389-405, 1978.

This is the first publication of Jeremy Bentham's essay on "Paederasty," written about 1785. Bentham suppressed the essay during his lifetime, for fear of public outrage at his views on liberalizing the laws concerning homosexual activity.

"The essay which runs to over 60 manuscript pages, is the first known argument for homosexual law reform in England. Bentham advocates the decriminalization of' sodomy, which in his day was punished by hanging. He argues that homosexual acts do not "weaken" men, or threaten population or marriage, and documents their prevalence in ancient Greece and Rome. Bentham opposes punishment on utilitarian grounds and attacks ascetic sexual morality. In the preceding article (Journal of Homosexuality, 3(4), 1978, p. 383-387) the editor's introduction discussed the essay in the light of 18th-century legal opinion and quoted Bentham's manuscript notes that reveal his anxieties about expressing his views." Full text from columbia.edu Stonewall and Beyond: Lebian and Gay Culture at this link.



Subjects: LAW and Medicine & the Life Sciences › Legislation, Biomedical, SEXUALITY / Sexology, SEXUALITY / Sexology › Homosexuality
  • 10210

Homosexuality and civilization.

Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2003.

The history of homosexuality in Europe and parts of Asia from Homer to the 18th century. 



Subjects: SEXUALITY / Sexology › History of Sexuality / Sexology, SEXUALITY / Sexology › Homosexuality
  • 10211

Anatomy of the newborn: An atlas.

Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1969.

Self-illustrated by Crelin, this was the first atlas of human infant anatomy. Crelin followed this with a synopsis of the atlas, Functional anatomy of the newborn (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1973).



Subjects: ANATOMY › 20th Century, PEDIATRICS › Neonatology
  • 10212

The human vocal tract: Anatomy, function, development, and evolution.

New York: Vantage Press, 1987.


Subjects: ANATOMY › 20th Century, OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY (Ear, Nose, Throat) › Laryngology
  • 10213

The Framingham Study: An epidemiological investigation of cardiovascular disease.

Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1968.

"The Framingham Heart Study is a long-term, ongoing cardiovascular cohort study on residents of the town of FraminghamMassachusetts. The study began in 1948 with 5,209 adult subjects from Framingham, and is now on its third generation of participants.[1] Prior to it almost nothing was known about the "epidemiology of hypertensive or arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease".[2] Much of the now-common knowledge concerning heart disease, such as the effects of dietexercise, and common medications such as aspirin, is based on this longitudinal study. It is a project of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, in collaboration with (since 1971) Boston University.[1] "(Wikipedia article on Framingham Heart Study)

For further information regarding the Framingham Study, including the complete bibliography of publications from the study, see their website: https://www.framinghamheartstudy.org/

Digital facsimile of the 1968 paper from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 10214

The Framingham Heart Study and the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases: A historical perspective.

Lancet, 383 (9921) 999-1008., 2014.

Full text available from PubMedCentral at this link.



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY, CARDIOLOGY › History of Cardiology, EPIDEMIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology
  • 10215

Protecting America's health: The FDA, business, and one hundred years of regulation.

Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2003.


Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health
  • 10216

The ranks of death: A medical history of the conquest of America. By the late Colonel P. M. Ashburn...Edited by Frank D. Ashburn.

New York: Coward-McCann, 1947.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: Biogeography › History of Biogeography, EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, NATIVE AMERICANS & Medicine
  • 10217

Disease change and the role of medicine: The Navajo experience.

Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1983.


Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, NATIVE AMERICANS & Medicine, PUBLIC HEALTH, SOCIAL MEDICINE
  • 10218

Histoire du Collegium Medicum Antverpiense.

Antwerp: Imprimerie J.-E. Buschmann, 1858.

Text in French. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Belgium, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession
  • 10219

Paralysed with fear: The story of polio.

Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.


Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Neuroinfectious Diseases › Poliomyelitis (Infantile Paralysis), NEUROLOGY › Inflammatory Conditions › Poliomyelitis, VIROLOGY › History of Virology, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Picornaviridae › Poliovirus
  • 10220

Angel of death: The story of smallpox.

Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › History of Smallpox
  • 10221

History of human parasitology.

Clin. Microbiol. Rev., 15 (4) 595-612, 2002.

Full text, with extensive bibliography, from PubMedCentral at this link.



Subjects: PARASITOLOGY › History of Parasitology
  • 10222

Inside Russian medicine: An American doctor's first-hand report. With research assistance by Nicholas A. Petroff.

New York: Everest House, 1981.

A period piece but valuable for its professional assessment of the state of Russian medicine during the period.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Russia, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health
  • 10223

Medicine and public health in the People's Republic of China. Edited by Joseph R. Quinn.

Bethesda, MD: U.S. Dept. of Health, Education & Welfare, 1973.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, PUBLIC HEALTH, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health
  • 10224

The measure of America: American human development report, 2008-2009.

New York: Columbia University Press, 2008.

 " the first-ever human development report for a wealthy, developed nation. It introduces the American Human Development Index, which provides a single measure of well-being for all Americans, disaggregated by state and congressional district, as well as by gender, race, and ethnicity. The Index rankings of the 50 states and 436 congressional districts reveal huge disparities in the health, education, and living standards of different groups. Clear, precise, objective, and authoritative, this report will become the basis for all serious discussions concerning the realization of a fair, just, and globally competitive American society" (publisher).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , PUBLIC HEALTH, SOCIAL MEDICINE
  • 10225

The measure of America, 2010-2011: Mapping risks and resilience.

New York: NYU Press, 2010.

"This fully illustrated report, with over 130 color images, is based on the groundbreaking American Human Development Index, which provides a single measure of the well-being for all Americans, disaggregated by state and congressional district, as well as by race, gender, and ethnicity. The Index rankings of the 50 states and 435 congressional districts reveal huge disparities in the health, education, and living standards of different groups. For example, overall, Connecticut ranked first among states on the 2008-2009 Index, and Mississippi ranked last, suggesting that there is a 30-year gap in human development between the two states. Further, among congressional districts, New York’s 14th District, in Manhattan, ranked first, and California’s 20th District, near Fresno, ranked last. The average resident of New York’s 14th District earned over three times as much as the average resident of California’s 20th District, lived over four years longer, and was ten times as likely to have a college degree" (publisher).

After publication of this report in book form the Measure of America non-partisan, non-proft social science research project appears to have published its many following reports online. They are available at www.measureofamerica.org#.

 



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , PUBLIC HEALTH, SOCIAL MEDICINE
  • 10226

Alcoholics Anonymous: The story of how many thousands of men and women have recovered from alcoholism.

New York: Works Publishing Company, 1939.

"Describes how to recover from alcoholism, primarily written by William G. "Bill W." Wilson, one of the founders of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). It is the originator of the seminal "twelve-step method" widely used to treat many addictions, from alcoholism, heroin addiction and marijuana addiction to overeatingsex addiction and gambling addiction, with a strong spiritual and social emphasis.

"It is one of the best-selling books of all time, having sold 30 million copies.[1][2] In 2011, Time magazine placed the book on its list of the 100 best and most influential books written in English since 1923, the year in which the magazine was first published.[3] In 2012, the Library of Congress designated it as one of 88 'Books that Shaped America.'[4]" (Wikipedia article on The Big Book (Alcoholics Anonymous) accessed 04-2018).



Subjects: TOXICOLOGY › Drug Addiction, TOXICOLOGY › Drug Addiction › Alcoholism
  • 10227

The vegetable system. Or, the internal structure and the life of plants; their parts, and nourishment explained; their classes, orders, genera, and species, ascertained, and described; in a method altogether new: Comprehending an artificial index and a natural system. With figures of all plants designed and engraved by the author. The whole from nature only. 26 vols.

London: For the Author, 17591775.

This very extensive work consisting of 26 vols. in folio, with a total of 1548 plates, was the first comprehensive vernacular presentation of botany adopting Linnean generic names and binary nomenclature. It describes and illustrates about 26,000 plants. "The first volume (1759) is still in the old [i.e. pre-Linnaean] style, but from the second volume onward ... Linnaean binomials are used, although the sexual system is not followed ... Volume 5 contains "observations on a natural method, so far as it regards the connection of the classes." Hill's natural system was well worth studying but his voice remained unheard ... Hill was perhaps erratic and unconvincing ... but he was one of the first to rebel against Linnaeus's artificial system and essentialist classification' (F.A. Stafleu Linnaeus and the Linnaeans, Utrecht: 1971, p. 210)



Subjects: BOTANY, BOTANY › Classification / Systemization of Plants
  • 10228

Racial hygiene: Medicine under the Nazis.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988.


Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Germany, GENETICS / HEREDITY › Eugenics, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 10229

The Nazi war on cancer.

Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1999.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Germany, ONCOLOGY & CANCER › History of Oncology & Cancer, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences, TOXICOLOGY › Drug Addiction › History of Drug Addiction
  • 10230

Some account of the termites, which are found in Africa and other hot climates. In a letter from Mr. Henry Smeathman...to Sir Joseph Banks, Bart.

Phil. Trans., 71, 139-192., 1781.

Pioneering study of tropical termites, their mounds, and their behavior, well illustrated with engravings. Digital facsimile from the Royal Society at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Africa, ZOOLOGY › Arthropoda › Entomology
  • 10231

Anti-vivisection and the profession of medicine in Britain: A social history.

London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.


Subjects: Ethics, Biomedical › History of Biomedical Ethics, Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design, Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection
  • 10232

Emblematic monsters: Unnatural conceptions and deformed births in early modern Europe.

Amsterdam & New York: Rodopi, 2005.


Subjects: RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences, TERATOLOGY › History of Teratology
  • 10233

Deforesting the earth: From prehistory to global crisis.

Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2003.

This work, which was heralded as a masterwork of scholarship when published, originally consisted of 689pp. In 2006 the publishers issued "an abridgment" to make the work accessible to a "general readership." The abridgment is "only" 561pp. long.



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Ecology / Environment › History of Ecology / Environment
  • 10234

Ensaio sobre a topographia medica de Lisboa. ou consideraçoens especiaes relativas a' sua historia; meteorologia; geognosia; agoas potaveis; zoologia, quanto aos animaes mais utei, e em quanto ao homem sua parte hygienica e medica; a população, e suas respectivas observaçoens, &c.

Lisbon: Typographia de M.J. Coelho, 1843.


Subjects: Bioclimatology, Biogeography, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Portugal
  • 10235

Change of climate considered as a remedy in dyspetic, pulmonary, and other chronic affections; with an account of the most eligible places of residence for invalids in Spain, Portugal, Algeria, etc., at different seasons of the year; and an appendix on the mineral springs of the Pyrenees, Vichy, and Aix les Bains.

London: John Churchill, 1853.

The author, a pulmonary specialist at Cavendish Square, London, provides a detailed manual for invalid travellers, seeking cures for tuberculosis, and indigestion and "nervous affections." It may be one of the first travel guides for invalids. Unusual for the coverage of Algeria. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Bioclimatology, Biogeography, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Algeria, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Portugal, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Spain, PULMONOLOGY › Lung Diseases › Pulmonary Tuberculosis, THERAPEUTICS › Balneotherapy
  • 10236

Animal inside out: A Body Worlds production.

Heidelberg: Arts & Sciences, 2011.

Applying the technique and theatricality of plastination to the anatomy of animals including animals as large as elephants.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 21st Century, COMPARATIVE ANATOMY
  • 10237

Project Gutenberg.

Project Gutenberg, 1971.

http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page

Project Gutenberg, a volunteer project founded in 1971 by Michael S. Hart, was the first digital library. 

Later leapfrogged by much better financed non-profit or government-sponsored or commercial digitization projects, in 2018 Project Gutenberg offered 56,000 free e-books. 

The history of this pioneering project is enumerated here:

http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Gutenberg:About

 



Subjects: DIGITAL RESOURCES › Digital Archives & Libraries , DIGITAL RESOURCES › Digital Collaborations Online (Wikis)
  • 10238

BioDigital.

New York: BioDigital, 2002.

https://www.biodigital.com/

"The Word's First Human Visualization Platform: Anatomy, Disease & Treatments— all in interactive 3D. 

Web, Mobile and Augmented Reality

"the virtual body as the health equivalent of Google Maps" (New York Times)

"BioDigital was founded on the premise that 3D technology will transform the way we understand the human body. The volume and complexity of health information continues to increase, but the methods in which its communicated has not changed in centuries. Allowing people to see inside the body, using interactive 3D technology, promises to have a profound impact on the way we comprehend our health.

"To improve global health literacy using the first 3D body platform.

"Hailed as the equivalent of Google Maps for the human body, the BioDigital Human is a scientifically accurate cloud based virtual body that empowers everyone to learn about health and medicine in an entirely new visual format. Anatomy, disease and treatments - all in an engaging, interactive 3D format that resembles life itself" (https://www.biodigital.com/about).

 



Subjects: ANATOMY › 21st Century, ANATOMY › Anatomical Illustration › Computer Graphics, COMPUTING/MATHEMATICS in Medicine & Biology › Visualization, DIGITAL RESOURCES › Digital Archives & Libraries
  • 10239

The Repository.

London: The Royal Society, 2012.

https://blogs.royalsociety.org/history-of-science

This is the Royal Society's History of Science blog.



Subjects: DIGITAL RESOURCES › Blogs
  • 10240

A critical history of schizophrenia.

Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016.


Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, PSYCHOLOGY › History of Psychology
  • 10241

LC21: A Digital Strategy for the Library of Congress.

Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2000.

This digital roadmap for the world's largest library was undoubtedly influential not just on other U.S. libraries but on other libraries around the world.

"Contributors

"Description

"Digital information and networks challenge the core practices of libraries, archives, and all organizations with intensive information management needs in many respects—not only in terms of accommodating digital information and technology, but also through the need to develop new economic and organizational models for managing information. LC21: A Digital Strategy for the Library of Congress discusses these challenges and provides recommendations for moving forward at the Library of Congress, the world’s largest library. Topics covered in LC21 include digital collections, digital preservation, digital cataloging (metadata), strategic planning, human resources, and general management and budgetary issues. The book identifies and elaborates upon a clear theme for the Library of Congress that is applicable more generally: the digital age calls for much more collaboration and cooperation than in the past. LC21 demonstrates that information-intensive organizations will have to change in fundamental ways to survive and prosper in the digital age" (https://www.nap.edu/catalog/9940/lc21-a-digital-strategy-for-the-library-of-congress).

Full text is available from nap.edu at this link.



Subjects: DIGITAL RESOURCES › Digital Archives & Libraries
  • 10242

The Victorian Web: Literature, history and culture in the age of Victoria.

Providence, RI: victorianweb.org, 1987.

http://www.victorianweb.org/

"The Victorian Web, which originated in hypermedia environments (IntermediaStoryspace) that existed long before the World Wide Web, is one of the oldest academic and scholarly websites. It takes an approach that differs markedly from many Internet projects. Today the Internet offers many excellent resources — and we use them often! —  such as Project Gutenberg, the Internet Archive, the Library of Congress, and British Listed Buildings. These sites take the form of archives that quite properly preserve their information in the form of separate images or entire books accessible via search tools. The Victorian Web, in contrast, presents its images and documents, including entire books, as nodes in a network of complex connections. In other words, it emphasizes the link rather than the search tool (though it has one) and presents information linked to other information rather than atomized and isolated

"The Victorian Web takes a fundamentally different approach to finding and using information than do search-based Internet projects. Internet archives and invaluable Internet tools, such as Google, treat bodies of information as a chaotic swamp that one searches — one can’t say “negotiates” — with a wonderful laser-like tool that penetrates the fog and darkness. If we find what we're looking for, we leave immediately. We relate differently to hypertexts like the Victorian Web, which conceive of information existing within a complex ecology or set of connections, because they allow us to experience the richness of the texts and images we encounter. In the Victorian Web we encounter books, paintings, political events, and eminent and not-so-eminent Victorians in multiple contexts, which we can examine when and if we wish to do so. The Victorian Web also differs fundamentally from websites like Wikipedia and many reference works, such as Britannica, and the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography: Each of these justly renowned sites (which authors of material on this site use frequently) aims to present a single authoritative view of its subject. In contrast, the multivocal Victorian Web encourages multiple points of view and debate, in part because matters of contemporary interest rarely generate general agreement.

"Originally begun back in 1987 as a means of helping scholars and students in see connections between different fields, the site today has greatly expanded the kinds of connections one can find. For example, on this site commentary on the works of Charles Dickens exists linked to his life and contemporary social and political history, drama, religionbook illustration, economics, and so forth. Similarly, our online edition of Ruskin’s enormously influential The Seven Lamps of Architecture, whose original print version makes its excellent illustrations hard to use, places these images near the text that mentions them, often adding details, photographs of the subjects of the drawings, and connections to a wide range of useful material including secondary materials, Ruskin’s other works, and images of the Gothic and the Gothic Revival.

How large is it?

"97,441 documents and images as of February 208, and it grows every day. Approximately 5,000 documents are Spanish translations of the sections on literature and religion created by a team based at the University of Computense Madrid and initially funded by the Spanish government. A small number of documents about Ruskin and gender matters exist in French translation, too.

How many people use it?

"The site now receives 1.5 million page views a month" (http://www.victorianweb.org/misc/vwintro.html).

Sciences

Scientists featured on the Victorian Web

Scientists (cont.)

Related interests

 

 



Subjects: DIGITAL RESOURCES › Digital Archives & Libraries , LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 10243

Secret passions, secret remedies: Narcotic drugs in British Society, 1820-1930.

Philadelphia: Institute for the Study of Human Issues, 1984.

"....The major orientation is to opium, with two chapters on its alkaloid, morphine, occasional references to cocaine, and a mention of heroin. There is an enlightening discussion of reasons for the initial acceptance and then rejection of such drugs by Victorian Britain. Opium was a cheap and readily available antidote for the harsh life of the time and more effective than the traditional massive dosing by physicians. Its addictive nature gradually became apparent, and nonaddictive pain relievers such as aspirin became available"(publisher).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Opium, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences, TOXICOLOGY › Drug Addiction › History of Drug Addiction
  • 10244

ArtandMedicine.com.

Brooklyn, NY: Mark Rowley, 2003.

http://www.artandmedicine.com/Index.html

A highly personal but in all aspects extraordinary website/blog on the history of medical photography in the form of what Rowley calls his Cabinet Journal.



Subjects: ART & Medicine & Biology, DERMATOLOGY, DIGITAL RESOURCES › Blogs, IMAGING › Photography / Photomicrography
  • 10245

Le Journal des Médecines Cunéiformes.

Paris, 20032013.

http://people.ds.cam.ac.uk/mjw65/jmc/

Twenty-four issues were published. Table of Contents for all issues is available on the website.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Cuneiform, Periodicals Specializing in the History of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 10246

Navy medicine in Vietnam: Oral histories from Dien Bein Phu to the fall of Saigon.

Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2008.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Navy, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Vietnam War
  • 10247

Battle station sick bay: Navy medicine in World War II.

Washington, DC: Naval Institute Press, 1997.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Navy, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War II
  • 10248

Frozen in memory: U.S. Navy medicine in the Korean War.

St. Petersburg, FL: BookLocker.com, Inc., 2006.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Korean War, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Navy
  • 10249

Medical support of the Army Air Forces in World War II.

Washington, DC: Office of the Surgeon General, USAF, 1955.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Air Force, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War II
  • 10250

United States Army aeromedical support to African American fliers, 1941-1949: The Tuskegee flight surgeons.

Brooks City-Base TX: USAF School of Aerospace Medicine, 2007.

Digital facsimile from airforemedicine.af.mil at this link.



Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY › History of African Americans & Medicine & Biology, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Air Force, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War II
  • 10251

Space medicine in Project Mercury.

Washington, DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1965.

"Project Mercury was the first human spaceflight program of the United States, running from 1958 through 1963. An early highlight of the Space Race, its goal was to put a man into Earth orbit and return him safely, ideally before the Soviet Union. Taken over from the U.S. Air Forceby the newly created civilian space agency NASA, it conducted twenty unmanned developmental flights (some using animals), and six successful flights by astronauts. The program, which took its name from Roman mythology, cost $277 million in 1965 US dollars, and involved the work of 2 million people.[1] The astronauts were collectively known as the "Mercury Seven", and each spacecraft was given a name ending with a "7" by its pilot" (Wikipedia). Digital facsimile from history.nasa.gov at this link.



Subjects: AVIATION Medicine › History of Aviation / Aerospace Medicine
  • 10252

Biomedical results of Apollo.

Washington, DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1975.

Full text available from history.nasa.gov at this link.



Subjects: AVIATION Medicine › Aerospace Medicine
  • 10253

Biomedical results from Skylab. Edited by Richard S. Johnston and Lawrence F. Dietlein.

Washington, DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1977.

"Skylab was the United Statesspace station that orbited the Earth from 1973 to 1979, when it fell back to Earth amid huge worldwide media attention. Launched and operated by NASA, Skylab included a workshop, a solar observatory, and other systems necessary for crew survival and scientific experiments. It was launched unmanned by a modified Saturn V rocket, with a weight of 170,000 pounds (77 t). Lifting Skylab into low earth orbit was the final mission and launch of a Saturn V rocket (which was famous for carrying the manned Moon landing missions).[2] When data from onboard experiments (some of which were on physical film) were returned to Earth, analysis of scientific and engineering data of each mission was completed. Skylab's solar observatory was one of its major functions. Solar science was significantly advanced by the telescope, and its observation of the Sun was unprecedented. As the Skylab program drew to a close, NASA's focus had shifted to the development of the Space Shuttle, through which NASA hoped to reduce the cost of space access compared to previous launch systems" (Wikipedia).  Digital facsimile from ntrs.nasa.gov at this link.



Subjects: AVIATION Medicine › Aerospace Medicine
  • 10254

Space physiology and medicine. Edited by Arnauld E. Nicogossian and James F. Parker, Jr.

Washington, DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1982.


Subjects: AVIATION Medicine › Aerospace Medicine
  • 10255

Space biology and medicine. 5 vols. Vol. 1: Space and its exploration, edited by J. D. Rummel, V.A. Kotelnikov, and M. V. Ivanov. Vol. 2: Life support and habitability, edited by F. M. Sulzman and A. M. Genin. Vol. 3, Books 1 & 2: Humans in spaceflight, edited by Carolyn S. Leach Huntoon, Vesevolod V. Antipov, Anatoliy I. Grigoriev. Vol. 4: Health, performance, and safety of space crews, edited by Arnauld E. Nicogossian, Stanley R. Mohler, Oleg G. Gazenko, Anatoliy I. Grigoriev. Vol. 5: U.S. and Russian cooperation in space biology and medicine, edited by Charles F. Sawin, Svetlana I. Hanson, Nancy G. House, and Igor D. Pestov.

Reston, VA: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 19932009.

"The five-volume Space Biology and Medicine is a joint work of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Russian Academy of Sciences. In the first volume contributors describe the current status of their understanding of space, highlighting physical and ecological conditions as well as heavenly bodies: The book is divided into four parts: Part I, Historical Perspective; Part II, The Space Environment; Part III, Life in the Universe; and Part IV, Space Exploration. Chapter contributions were made by both U.S. and Russian authors. The book also features an appendix of Astronomical and Physical Quantities, a detailed subject index, and an 8-page color section.

Volume II has two parts: Part 1—The Spacecraft Environment, and Part 2—Life Support Systems. This volume addresses major issues and requirements for safe habitability and work beyond the Earth’s atmosphere. It is intended for the use of students at various levels, who are majoring in biomedical and technical subjects and intending to specialize in space sciences; engineers developing life support systems; and physicians and scientists formulating medical specifications for habitability conditions onboard spacecraft, and monitoring compliance with them.

Volume III has two parts: Book 1—Effects of Microgravity, and Book 2—Effect of Other Spaceflight Factors, which provide in-depth discussions of physiological adaptation to the space environment. The editors of Volume III are Dr. C. S. Leach Huntoon of the U.S. and Professor V. V. Antipov and corresponding member of the Academy of Sciences A. I. Grigoriev of the Russian Federation.

This fifth volume is a comprehensive summary of U.S. and Russian cooperation in the fields of space biology and medicine. It summarizes the experience and insights drawn from many years of Russian and American cooperation in the peaceful study and use of outer space. The first four volumes of this series focused on issues that demonstrate the current state of knowledge about space and the development of rocket and space technologies; about human life support beyond the Earth's biosphere; about the functional and structural changes caused by the effects of space flight on human beings and other biological subjects; and about the strategies and specific ways to provide medical support during space flight. The fifth volume integrates data from previous research and observations together with scientific materials obtained in recent years on the most important topics in space biology and medicine" (publisher).

 

 

 


Subjects: AVIATION Medicine › Aerospace Medicine, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Russia, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States
  • 10256

Spacefaring: The human dimension.

Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2001.


Subjects: AVIATION Medicine › Aerospace Medicine
  • 10257

Les médecins de l'Égypte pharaonique, essai de prosopographie.

Brussels: Édition de la Fondation Égyptologique Reine Élisabeth, 1958.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Egypt › History of Ancient Medicine in Egypt
  • 10258

Histoire de la médecine tibetaine. Vie de Yutok Yonten Gonpo l'Ancien, traduit de l'anglais par Jean-Paul R. Claudon et Sylvaine Jean avec la collaboration de Martine Pageon-Tarin.

Edition , Saint-Dié des Vosges, 1989.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Tibet
  • 10259

The natural history of the order Cetacea, and the oceanic inhabitants of the Arctic regions.

London: Published by the Author, 1834.

Characterizing himself "Surgeon-Accoucheur" on the title page, Dewhurst lectured in 1827-8 on anatomy and physiology, and served as a ship's surgeon, making voyage to Greenland and its surrounding seas in 1824. During that voyage he  studied large Arctic creatures, especially whales. In the decade after his return Dewhurst prepared this description of polar sea life.  Whales were of especial interest in this period, because of the use of their blubber in many household objects, and the value of their oil for lamps, as whale oil burned without soot. Dewhurst's work was one of the first studies to examine the different species of whales, as well as dolphins and other marine life. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Arctic, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Marine Mammals, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Marine Mammals › Cetacea
  • 10260

The marine mammals of the north-western coast of North America described and illustrated together with an account of the American whale-fishery.

San Francisco, CA: John H. Carmany and Company & New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1874.

Digital facsimile from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Marine Mammals, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Marine Mammals › Cetacea
  • 10261

The camel: His organization habits and uses considered with reference to his introduction into the United States.

Boston, MA: Gould and Lincoln, 1856.

Marsh, who is remembered today for his contributions to ecology in his book, Man and nature, was appointed by president Zachary Taylor  United States minister resident in the Ottoman Empire from 1849-1854. There he undoubtedly became familiar with camels, and believed that there would be economic and other benefits of introducing the camel into the United States. His book covers a broad range of issues relating to the camel, including breeds, diet, diseases, temperament and training. Marsh also includes a chapter on the military uses of the camel, which he felt was perfectly suited for the warfare of his day. According to Marsh, the camel "is a much less timid animal than the horse or mule." He also believed that riding a camel offered a better range of vision, because it is two feet higher than the horse. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy
  • 10262

Animals and the shaping of modern medicine: One health and its histories.

Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

A pioneering effort to draw the connections between the development of veterinary medicine and the development of medicine in general. With an extensive annotated bibliography.



Subjects: VETERINARY MEDICINE › History of Veterinary Medicine
  • 10263

Antivivisection and medical science in Victorian society.

Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1975.


Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 10264

Vivisection in historical perspective. Edited by Nicholaas A. Rupke.

London: Croom Helm, 1987.


Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 10265

Botany in medieval and renaissance universities.

New York: Garland Publishing, 1991.

Reprints Reeds, "Publishing scholarly books in the sixteenth century,"  Scholarly Publishing (April, 1983), 259-274.



Subjects: BOTANY › History of Botany, Renaissance Medicine › History of Renaissance Medicine
  • 10266

Idées sur les secours à donner aux pauvres malades dans une grande ville.

Philadelphia & Paris: Moutard, 1786.

Dupont proposed replacing large city hospitals with smaller institutions similar to those then being tried in England. Du Pont studied medicine before devoting himself to political economy. Digital facsimile from BnF Gallica at this link.



Subjects: HOSPITALS
  • 10267

Recueil général des lois, réglemens, décisions et circulaires sur le service des hôpitaux militaires. 2 vols.

Paris: De l'Imprimerie Royale, 1809.

On the organization and administration of French military hospitals during the Napoleonic era, and probably the most comprehensive account published up to this time on the administration of military hospitals in general. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, HOSPITALS, LAW and Medicine & the Life Sciences › Legislation, Biomedical
  • 10268

Codex medicamentarius sive pharmacopoea gallica jussu regis optimi et ex mandato summi rerum internarum regni administri, editus a Facultate Medica Parisiensi anno 1818.

Paris: Hacquart, 1818.

The first French national pharmacopeia. The French pharmacopeia became the model for later national attempts to publish national pharmacopeias. Notably the first U.S. pharmacopeia was issued in 1820. After a legal notice in French this work is entirely in Latin, making in one of the later significant medical publications in Latin. Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, PHARMACOLOGY › Pharmacopeias
  • 10269

Traité des maladies chirurgicales d'origine congénitale.

Paris: Masson & Cie, 1898.

The first book entirely devoted to the surgical treatment of congenital abnormalities. The work also contains pp. 593-698 an exposition of Kirmisson's staged reduction of congenital dislocations of the hip, and discusses craniofacial anomalies and their surgical correction. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: GENETICS / HEREDITY › HEREDITARY / CONGENITAL DISEASES OR DISORDERS, GENETICS / HEREDITY › HEREDITARY / CONGENITAL DISEASES OR DISORDERS › Cranialfacial Disorders, ORTHOPEDICS › Orthopedic Surgery & Treatments › Hip, PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY › Cranialfacial Surgery, Pediatric Surgery
  • 10270

Theophrast und Galen – Celsus und Paracelsus. Medizin, Naturphilosophie und Kirchenreform im Basler Buchdruck bis zum Dreissigjährigen Krieg. Publikationen der Universitätsbibliothek, Nr. 36. 4 vols. plus index vol.

Basel: Universitätsbibliothek, 2005.

"The project began as a exhibition in the Basle University Library to commemorate the major anniversaries of the birth and death of Paracelsus (1493–1541). Not only did he work and teach in Basle, but many of his writings were first published there by his followers. Printers like Heinrich Petri and Peter Perna supported the new medicine both for its therapeutics and for its links with evangelical religion. The conjunction of medicine, science and religion was promoted by the presence in the city of many religious exiles, such as Adam von Bodenstein and Guglielmo Gratarolo, who took advantage of willing printers to publish their beliefs in treatises in German and in Latin, the universal language of scholarship. The rise of the university as a bastion of Protestant scientific learning under Zwinger and the Platter family attracted students from all over northern Europe, who took back to their homes the latest products of the Basle presses. All this is wonderfully documented in the Basle Library, whose collections of early printed books, manuscripts and autograph letters are a prime resource for students of sixteenth-century medicine and science. Not surprisingly, the 1993 exhibition was a visual and intellectual feast, and attracted large numbers of visitors.

The small catalogue then took on a life of its own, and expanded in concept and content. The list of imprints by Paracelsus and his followers, the basis for Part 2, nos. 175–210, was extended to cover medicine and science, interpreted broadly to include mathematics, geography and even rhetoric, as well as the role of the printers in supporting, and at times directing, evangelical reform in a godly city. In all, 766 items are listed; 174 in Part 1, covering the period before 1550; 36 in Part 2; 506 in Part 3, non-Paracelsian imprints after 1550; and 10 additions in the Introduction. Excluding the introduction and index, this bibliographical cornucopia runs to 3694 pages, an average of five pages per printed book. When the strictly bibliographical description rarely runs to more than ten lines, and the concluding paragraph giving details of the provenance of each copy (or often copies) usually to less than that, one may wonder how Dr Hieronymus has managed to fill so many pages.

Each entry begins with a short listing of the author, title, place and date of printing, the name of the printer, and the size of the book. This is then followed by a description of the book's contents, composition, history, and significance in the history of medicine and science. Often there are comments about the place of the book in the history of printing in Basle, and the entry ends with a description of exemplars in the Basle Library. Often a reproduction of the title page is given, sometimes in half-page length, but usually full-page, and even as folding plates attached to the inside back cover. But these reproductions range widely to show some of the illustrations, manuscript notes of ownership or commentary, and even some of the manuscript documentation and drafts that reveal the history of the book's publication. No copy of 413, John Caius' very rare edition of some minor works of Galen, 1557, survives in Basle. But in the collections of the Frey-Grynaeum Institute there exists the copy of the fourth of these works, De ossibus, that Caius prepared for his printer, Oporinus. The illustrations show how Caius inserted his corrections into the 1543 Paris edition before sending the volume to Basle. These abundant reproductions provide a remarkable visual resource for the history of medicine and of printing (one illustration, I know, has already helped in identifying a damaged volume in a London library). An electronic version of some of the entries, incorporating still more illustrations, can be found on the Library's website: www.ub.unibas.ch/kadmos/gg/; or via their ‘Virtuelle Bibliothek’ (Handschriften/Griechische Geist)."

"It tells one story if one begins at the beginning, and another if one begins at the end, with the seven indexes that form volume 5. A mere glance at its first six indexes, of dates, authors and titles, printers and their location, addressees, owners, and the composers of commentary, dedications or liminal poems, opens windows onto the early modern republic of letters. But this information is dwarfed by that in index 7, a gallimaufry of names and topics ranging from God and ruins to brain disease, the rhinoceros and the wondrous Johannes Baptista Campofulgosus. As with Zwinger's Theatrum vitae humanae, 1571, the subject of possibly the longest notice in the catalogue, all human life is here. Anyone with an interest in early modern science who looks up any name or word is likely to find unexpected information or a new context for familiar material. But, I suspect, not even 134 pages of double-columned index will reveal everything." (quotations from the review by Vivian Nutton, "Basel, printing, and the early modern intellectual world," Med. Hist. 2007 Apr 1; 51(2): 246–249.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Chemistry / Biochemistry, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Individual Authors, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Switzerland
  • 10271

Pharmacopoeia, medicamentorum omnium quae hodie ad publica medentium munia officinis extant, tractationem & usum ex antiquorum medicorum praescripto continens, pharmacopoeis omnibus, atque etiam iis qui opus factitant medicum, valde utilis & necessaria.

Basel: Thomas Guerinus, 1561.

Foes is credited with coining the word pharmacopeia in the title of this work. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY, PHARMACOLOGY › Pharmacopeias
  • 10272

Beating the odds: The University of Massachusetts Medical School, a history, 1962–2012.

Cambridge, MA: TidePool Press, 2017.

The University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, MA was founded as recently as 1962.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northwest, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession
  • 10273

Wandtafeln zur Schwangerschafts- und Geburtskunde. Text volume in quarto format plus atlas in double elephant folio format (915 x 650mm.)

Leipzig: Ernest Julius Günther, 1865.

This huge atlas of obstetric wall charts contains 20 chromolithographed plates measuring over 3 feet by 2 feet, illustrating the female reproductive anatomy, stages of pregnancy, normal and breech presentations of the fetus, and various types of vaginal delivery. These plates were intended to be mounted on the wall; they are probably the largest obstetrical charts ever published in book form. Included is an illustration of “Schultze’s mechanism” of normal placental separation and expulsion, in which the placenta slips “through the same rent in the membranes from which the fetus emerged . . . pulling its attached membranes along, inner surface showing, like a sock turned inside out” (Speert, Obstetrics and Gynecology: A History and Iconography, p. 250). Schultze, a professor of obstetrics at the University of Jena, is also known for his invention of the Schultze obstetric simulator, a dummy or manikin of the female pelvis used to demonstrate the mechanism of childbirth; this device was widely used in both Germany and the United States. Digital facsimile of the text from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century, ANATOMY › Anatomical Illustration, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS
  • 10274

The casualty officer's handbook.

London: Butterworths, 1962.

The first handbook published in England on what later came to be called emergency medicine. Ellis, appointed to the Leeds General Infirmary in 1952, was the first "Casualty" consultant in England, and remained so until his retirement in 1969. His book mainly covered aspects of trauma but also included a final chapter on resuscitation.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), Emergency Medicine
  • 10275

A Cree healer and his medicine bundle: Revelations of indigenous wisdom: Healing plants, practices, and stories.

Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books, 2015.

"With the rise of urban living and the digital age, many North American healers are recognizing that traditional medicinal knowledge must be recorded before being lost with its elders. A Cree Healer and His Medicine Bundle is a historic document, including nearly 200 color photos and maps, in that it is the first in which a native healer has agreed to open his medicine bundle to share in writing his repertoire of herbal medicines and where they are found. Providing information on and photos of medicinal plants and where to harvest them, anthropologist David E. Young and botanist Robert D. Rogers chronicle the life, beliefs, and healing practices of Medicine Man Russell Willier in his native Alberta, Canada. Despite being criticized for sharing his knowledge, Willier later found support in other healers as they began to realize the danger that much of their traditional practices could die out with them. 

"With Young and Rogers, Willier offers his practices here for future generations. At once a study and a guide, A Cree Healer and His Medicine Bundle touches on how indigenous healing practices can be used to complement mainstream medicine, improve the treatment of chronic diseases, and lower the cost of healthcare. The authors discuss how mining, agriculture, and forestry are threatening the continued existence of valuable wild medicinal plants and the role of alternative healers in a modern health care system. Sure to be of interest to ethnobotanists, medicine hunters, naturopaths, complementary and alternative health practitioners, ethnologists, anthropologists, and academics, this book will also find an audience with those interested in indigenous cultures and traditions" (publisher).

"The Cree (CreeNēhiyawFrenchCri) are one of the largest groups of First Nations in North America, with over 200,000 members living in Canada. The major proportion of Cree in Canada live north and west of Lake Superior, in OntarioManitobaSaskatchewanAlberta and the Northwest Territories. About 38,000 live in Quebec.[1]

In the United States, this Algonquian-speaking people historically lived from Lake Superior westward. Today, they live mostly in Montana, where they share a reservation with the Ojibwe (Chippewa).

The documented westward migration over time has been strongly associated with their roles as traders and hunters in the North American fur trade.[3] "(Wikipedia).



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, NATIVE AMERICANS & Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › Ethnopharmacology, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Montana
  • 10276

A history of accident and emergency medicine, 1948-2004.

Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.

Concerns experience in Britain.



Subjects: Emergency Medicine
  • 10277

The beginnings of California's medical history.

California & Western Medicine, 23(5), 561–576., 1925.

Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American West, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › California
  • 10278

Mémoire sur les vers intestinaux.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1858.

Beneden's treatise on the development, transformation, and life-histories of parasitic worms won the Grand prix des sciences physiques of the Institut de France. It was published in the "International Scientific Series" (1875), under the title Les commensaux et les parasites dans le règne animal, and was translated into English and German. The 1875 edition introduced the key biological concept Commensalism. In ecology this is defined as "a class of relationships between two organisms where one organism benefits from the other without affecting it. This is in contrast with mutualism, in which both organisms benefit from each other, amensalism, where one is harmed while the other is unaffected, and parasitism, where one benefits while the other is harmed." Digital facsimile of the 1858 edition from the Internet Archive at this link. English translation with commensaux quaintly translated as "messmates" in Animal parasites and messmates (1876). Digital facsimile of the English translation from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Ecology / Environment, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms
  • 10279

California's medical story.

San Francisco, CA: Printed by The Grabhorn Press for J. W. Stacey, Inc., 1932.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American West, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › California
  • 10280

Doctors of the old west: A pictorial history of medicine on the frontier.

Seattle, WA: Superior Publishing Company, 1967.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American West
  • 10281

The Kansas doctor: A century of pioneering.

Lawrence, KA: University of Kansas Press, 1959.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Midwest, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Kansas
  • 10282

Medicine in Chicago, 1850-1950: A chapter in the social and scientific development of a city.

American History Research Center, 1957.

Second edition, Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1991.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Midwest, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Illinois
  • 10283

To the ends of the earth: Women's search for education in medicine.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1992.


Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About
  • 10284

The doctor in Oregon: A medical history.

Portland, OR: Oregon Historical Society, 1947.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northwest, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Oregon
  • 10285

Medicine in the making of Montana. Written by Paul C. Phillips from his own researches and the pioneer manuscripts of Llewellyn L. Callaway. Additional researches and notes by contributors.

Missoula, MT: Montana State University Press, 1962.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American West, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Montana
  • 10286

Medicine in territorial Arizona.

Phoenix, AZ: Arizona Historical Foundation, 1966.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American West, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Arizona
  • 10287

History of medicine in Nebraska. Albert F. Tyler, Editor. Ella F. Auerbach, Compiler.

Omaha, NE: Magic City Printing Co., 1928.

This work was edited by Tyler from the writings of 24 collaborators. Reprinted and augmented, with an index, by Bernice M. Hetzner. Omaha, NE: University fo Nebraska Medical Center, 1977. Digital facsimile of the 1977 edition from unmc.edu at this link. Review of original edition from jamanetwork.com at this link, from which I quote this selection: "The beginning of the history of medicine in Nebraska can be traced to the week of Sept. 26, 1819, when United States troops came up the Missouri River by steamboat and landed at Fort Calhoun, near Omaha. One of this band, Dr. John Gale, married an Indian chief's daughter, and his grand-daughter, Dr. Suzanne La Flesche, afterward Picotte, graduated from the Women's Medical College of Philadelphia. She thus was the only American Indian woman physician."



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Midwest, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Nebraska, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 10288

Confederate hospitals on the move: Samuel H. Stout and the Army of Tennessee.

Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 1996.


Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE › History of U.S. Civil War Medicine, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American South, HOSPITALS › History of Hospitals
  • 10289

The encyclopedia of Civil War medicine.

London & New York: Taylor & Francis, 2008.


Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE › History of U.S. Civil War Medicine, Encyclopedias, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10290

Lincoln and medicine.

Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 2012.


Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE › History of U.S. Civil War Medicine, BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Biographies of Individuals, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Midwest, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10291

Histoire naturelle des cétacés des mers d'Europe. Extrait des tomes XXXVIII, XL, XLV, XLIII des Mémoires couronnés et autres Mémoires publiés par l'Académie royale des sciences, des lettres et des beaux-arts de Belgique - 1889.

Brussels: F. Hayez, 1889.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Marine Mammals, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Marine Mammals › Cetacea
  • 10292

Ostéographie des cétacés vivants et fossiles, comprenant la description et l'iconographie du squelette et du système dentaire de ces animaux, ainsi que des documents relatifs à leur histoire naturelle. Folio atlas + 3 vols. text.

Paris: Arthus Bertrand, 18691880.

Digital facsimile from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: COMPARATIVE ANATOMY, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Marine Mammals › Cetacea
  • 10293

Doctors under three flags.

Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 1951.

Covers the history of medicine in Detroit and Michigan between 1701 and 1837 when Michigan became a state. Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Midwest, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Michigan, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 10294

The art of medicine: Over 2000 years of images and imagination.

Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2012.

"The pharmaceutical magnate Henry S. Wellcome (1853-1936) sought to illumine the 'history of the Healing art' across cultures and from the ancient past to his own day through his vast historical medical collection. This large, visually arresting volume represents a studied sampling of the Wellcome collection and its ambition to encapsulate, through art and artifact, a spectrum of medical questions, remedies, and their sociocultural consequences." Messbarger. ISIS 104: 145, 2013



Subjects: ART & Medicine & Biology, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10295

An historical sketch of the state of medicine in the American Colonies, from their first settlement to the period of the Revolution.

Albany, NY: Charles van Benhuysen, Printer, 1850.

A pioneering historical interpretation of the development of medicine in the 13 colonies up to the American Revolution. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link. This is the second, significantly expanded edition of an address Beck delivered before the Medical Society of the State of New York in 1842. Digital facsimile of the 1842 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: American (U.S.) REVOLUTIONARY WAR MEDICINE › History of U.S. Revolutionary War Medicine, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northeast
  • 10296

A catalogue of scientific and technical periodicals, 1665-1895. Together with chronological tables and a library checklist. 2nd edition.

Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 1897.

Includes one of the most comprehensive listings of scientific periodicals, including medical, up to the time of publication. The chronological tables show the runs of the various journals within a time frame. There are indices to subjects covered and titles. Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Periodicals
  • 10297

Läkare och läkekonst i Finland under 300 år 1640-1940.

Ekenäs : Ekenäs Tryckeri ABs Förlag, 1978.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Finland
  • 10298

Medical education in Mississippi: A history of the School of Medicine.

Jackson, MS: Medical Alumni Chapter...University of Mississippi, 1984.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American South, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Mississippi, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 10299

Contraception and abortion in nineteenth-century America.

Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1994.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , Contraception › History of Contraception, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › Abortion, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999