An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15423 entries, 13280 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 17, 2021

Browse by Entry Number 5100–5199

115 entries
  • 5100

Mediterranean, Malta, or undulant fever.

London: Macmillan, 1897.

An authoritative summary of current knowledge of Malta fever.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Malta, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Brucellosis
  • 5101

On the application of the serum test to the differential diagnosis of typhoid and Malta fever.

Lancet, 1, 656-59, 1897.

Agglutination test for the diagnosis of undulant fever.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Brucellosis
  • 5102

REPORTS of the Commission appointed by the Admiralty, the War Office, and the Civil Government of Malta, for the investigation of Mediterranean fever, under the supervision of an advisory committee of the Royal Society. 7 pts.

London: Harrison & Sons, 19051907.

The important findings of the Mediterranean Fever Commission are summarized in Topley & Wilson’s Bacteriology,1975, p. 2173; probably the most valuable was that of T. Zammit, who showed goat’s milk to be the main source of infection (pt. 4, p. 97). See entry 10780.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Malta, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Brucellosis
  • 5103

Studies on Brucella (Alkaligenes) melitensis.

Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1925.

Forms Bulletin No. 143 of the U.S. Public Health Service Hygienic Laboratory. Alice Evans showed that the causal organism of Malta fever was closely related to Brucella abortus, responsible for contagious abortion in cattle. See also her earlier paper in J. infect. Dis.,1918, 22, 580-93.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Brucellosis, VETERINARY MEDICINE, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 1815
  • 5104

Colóquios dos simples, e drogas he cousas mediçinais da Índia e assi dalgũas frutas achadas nella onde se tratam algũas cousas tocantes a medicina, pratica, e outras cousas boas pera saber.

Goa, India: João de Endem, 1563.

The first account of Indian materia medica and the first textbook on tropical medicine written by a European. It includes a classic account of Asiatic cholera, the first account of this disease by a European. This is the second book known to have been printed in India, of which copies survive. Garcia de Orta sailed for India in 1534 as Chief Physician aboard the armada of the Viceroy Martim Afonso de Sousa. He worked and carried out his research at Goa, where he died in 1568. His book was first printed by João de Endem at his press in St. John's College, Goa, and completed on April 10, 1563. For an account of its author, see L. H. Roddis, Ann. med. Hist., 1929, 1, 198-207. Digital facsimile of the 1563 edition from Biblioteca Nacional de Portugal at this link



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 5104.1

Voyage aux Indes Orientales et à la Chine, fait par ordre du Roi depuis 1774 jusqu’en 1781. 2 vols.

Paris: L'Auteur, 1782.

Vol. 1, pp. 113-16, “No author before the time of Sonnerat gives us so distinct an account of the epidemic prevalence of cholera, so full a description of its varieties or has attributed it so positively to the physical misery of the natives of the country” (Macpherson, No. 5111.2). English translation, 1788-89.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Indonesia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera, VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 5105

Suggestions respecting the cause, nature, and treatment of cholera.

Lond. med. surg. J., n.s. 2, 151-53, 1832.

Parkin suggested the water-born character of cholera and the use of charcoal filters for water purification.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 5106

On the pathology and mode of communication of the cholera.

Lond. med. Gaz., 44, 745-52, 923-29, 1849.

Snow first became interested in cholera at Newcastle-on-Tyne during the epidemic of 1831-1832, and recurrent outbreaks of the disease gave him the opportunity to investigate it in detail. His paper on cholera, published shortly after his (extremely rare) 31-page pamphlet On the Mode of Communication of Cholera (1849)  contained his first demonstration of the specific nature of the disease, which he defined correctly as an infection of the alimentary canal transmitted by ingesting fecal matter from cholera patients, in most cases via contaminated water. Snow proved his theory of cholera transmission by collecting data on a large number of outbreaks and correlating them to local water supplies. He argued, based on his data, that cholera was caused by “a specific living, waterborne, self-reproducing cell or germ” (Dictionary of Scientific Biography)—a conclusion all the more remarkable in that it predated the germ theory of disease by over a decade.

Snow may have been motivated to contribute his paper to the London Medical Gazette because a review of his separately published pamphlet published in that journal on pp. 466-470 of the 1849 volume stated that he had not proved the contagious nature of cholera.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 5106.1

Osservazioni microscopiche e deduzioni patologiche sul cholera asiatico.

Gazz. med. ital. fed. tosc., 2 ser., 4, 397-401, 405-12, 1854.

Pacini described vibrios seen in the intestinal contents of cholera victims. He incriminated these vibrios as the pathogen in the disease, anticipating Koch (No. 5108) by 30 years. See N. Howard-Jones. Perspect. Biol. Med.,1971, 13, 422-33.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 5107

Unterschungen und Beobachtungen über die Verbreitungsart der Cholera.

Munich: J. G. Cotta, 1855.

Pettenkofer gave much attention to the etiology of cholera. He postulated the theory that a specific germ, certain local conditions, certain seasonal conditions, and certain individual conditions are all necessary for an epidemic to occur (the Boden theory).



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 5108

Ueber die Cholerabakterien.

Dtsch. med. Wschr., 10, 725-28, 1884.

Discovery of the cholera vibrio and of its transmission by drinking water, food, and clothing.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Vibrio , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 5109

Le choléra asiatique chez le cobaye.

C. R. Soc. Biol. (Paris), 44, 635-37, 671, 1892.

Haffkine’s vaccine against cholera was the first to meet with any success.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 2546
  • 5110

Ueber die specifische Bedeutung der Choleraimmunität (Bakteriolyse).

Z. Hyg. InfektKr., 17, 355-400; 18, 1-16, 1894, 1895.

Pfeiffer and Isayev recorded the occurrence of bacteriolysis in cholera vibrios under certain conditions: immune bacteriolysis, “Pfeiffer’s phenomenon”. Abridged English translation of second part in Bibel, Milestones in immunology (1988).



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › Bacteriolysis, IMMUNOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 5111

Zur aktiven Immunisierung des Menschen gegen Cholera.

Zbl. Bakt., Abt. I, 19, 97-104, 1896.

Kolle introduced the killed cholera vaccine.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 5111.1

Über Cholera- und choleraähnliche Vibrionen unter den aus Mekka zurückkehrenden Pilgern.

Z. Hyg. InfektKr., 53, 281-304, 1906.

Isolation of El Tor vibrio, a particular strain of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. Gotschlich first identified this strain in 1905 at a quarantine camp on the Sinai Peninsula in El Tor, Egypt . The vibrios were found in the guts of six pilgrims returning from Mecca. Though the pilgrims failed to show ante or post mortem evidence of cholera, the vibrios isolated from the guts were agglutinable within the anti-cholera serum. 



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Vibrio , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Egypt, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Saudi Arabia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 5111.2

Annals of cholera: from the earliest periods to the year 1817.

London: Ranken & Co, 1872.


Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 5111.3

A history of Asiatic cholera.

London: Macmillan, 1876.


Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 5111.4

Cholera.

Geneva: World Health Organization, 1959.

Includes a section on the history of cholera. WHO Monograph Series,No. 43.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, Global Health, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera
  • 1681
  • 5112
  • 5136

Abhandlungen aus der Seuchengeschichte und Seuchenlehre. Pt. 1: Die Pest. Pt. 2: Die Cholera. 2 vols. in 3.

Giessen: A. Töpelmann, 19081912.


Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 5113

De epidemia et peste.

Basel: Martin Flach, circa 1474.

One of the earliest works written on public health, and one of the earliest printed medical books. It was first printed in Arnaldus de Villanova’s De arte cognoscendi venena (Padua, 1473; Mantua, 1473). Above is the first separate edition. ISTC no. iv00002000. Digital facsimile from Harvard University Libraries at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Portugal, PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 5114

Büchlein der Ordnung (Pest Regiment)

Ulm: Johann Zainer, 1473.

Steinhöwel was a Swabian author, humanist, and translator who was much inspired by the Italian Renaissance. His translations of medical treatises and fiction were an important contribution to early Renaissance Humanism in Germany. This was a famous book; six printed editions appeared in the 15th century. It is reproduced in facsimile in A. C. Klebs: Die ersten gedruckten Pestschriften, 1936. ISTC No. is00762800. Digital facsimile from the Bayerische StaatsBibliothek at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans)
  • 5115

Tractatus de pestilentia.

Augsburg: Johann Keller, 14781482.

The most widely disseminated of all plague tracts from the time of the Black Death, of which 33 printed editions appeared in the 15th century. A French rhymed version appeared in 1476, but this version is very different from the prose, and from the pre-printing manuscripts that are known. The plague tracts from the Black Death represent the first productions of a large-scale public health effort in Europe. ISTC No. ij00015000. Digital facsimile from the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › France, PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 5117

De peste libri quatuor, truculentissimi morbi historiam ratione et experientiâ confirmatum exhibentes.

Arnheim: ex off. J. Jacobi, 1646.

English translation, 1722. Digital facsimile of the Amsterdam 1665 edition revised and expanded by the author from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans)
  • 2528.1
  • 5118

Scrutinium physico-medicum contagiosae luis, quae pestis dicitur.

Rome: typ. Mascardi, 1658.

Kircher, a Jesuit scholar and polymath, not specifically trained in medicine, was probably the first to employ the microscope in investigating the cause of disease. He mentioned that the blood of plague patients was filled with a “countless brood of worms not perceptible to the naked eye, but to be seen in all putrefying matter through the microscope” (Garrison). He could not have seen the plague bacillus with his low-power microscope, but he probably saw the larger micro-organisms. He was the first to state explicitly the theory of contagion by animalculae as the cause of infectious diseases.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans), MICROBIOLOGY
  • 5119
BILLS OF MORTALITY

London’s dreadful visitation, or, a collection of all the Bills of Mortality for the present year: beginning the 27th of December 1664, and ending the 19th of December following…By the Company of Parish Clerks of London.

London: E. Cotes, 1665.

This is a valuable statistical record of the great plague of 1665. (No. 6052 in the Bibliotheca Osleriana.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans), PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 5120

Loimographia. An account of the great plague of London in the year 1665. By William Boghurst. Now first printed from the British Museum Sloane Ms. 349, for the Epidemiological Society of London. Edited by J.F. Payne.

London: Shaw & Sons, 1894.

This work was written in 1666 and first published as above. Boghurst, an apothecary, did good work during the great plague; in his book he differentiated plague from typhus. Payne’s introduction to the book contains some valuable historical data.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans), INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5121

Λοιμόλόγια sive pestis nuperae apud populum Londinensem grassantis narratio historica.

London: J. Nevill, 1672.

Best medical record of the Great Plague of 1665. Hodges was physician to the City of London and the medical hero of the great epidemic.

English translation by John Quincy, 1720: 

Loimologia, or, An historical account of the plague in London in 1665 : with precautionary directions against the like contagion.

Digital facsimile of the 1721 third edition of the translation from the Internet Archive at this link.

 



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans), INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 5122

De postrema Melitensi lue praxis historica.

Palermo, Italy: Ex typographia Petri de Isola, 1677.

This work, recording the epidemic of plague in Malta in 1675-76, was the first medical work published by a Maltese.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Malta, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans)
  • 5123

A short discourse concerning pestilential contagion, and the methods to be used to prevent it.

London: S. Buckley, 1720.

In 1719 Mead was asked for advice concerning an outbreak of plague in Marseilles, and replied with the above tract of 59 pages, which has been called the first epidemiological report produced by a physician at the command of the state. It underwent seven editions in one year. By the eighth edition (1722) Mead expanded it into a book of 150 pages. Mead concluded that isolation of the sick is more effective in stopping the spread of infection than general quarantine or fumigation. The book has been called almost a prophecy of what was to develop as the English public health system.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans), PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 5124

Tentamen de inoculandi peste.

London: J. Tuach, 1755.

Weszprémi proposed preventive inoculation against plague.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans)
  • 5125

La peste bubonique à Hong-Kong.

Ann. Inst. Pasteur, 8, 662-67, Paris, 1894.

Yersin discovered the plague bacillus Pasteurella (Yersinia) pestis, isolating it from excised buboes. He published the first account of this organism. Preliminary note in C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris), 1894, 119, 356.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Pasteurella, BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Yersinia pestis, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans)
  • 5126

The plague in the East.

Brit. Med. J., 2, 615-16, 1894.

Rennie appears to be the first seriously to support the theory of transmission of the plague bacillus by rats and to present evidence in support of that theory.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans)
  • 5127

La peste bubonique. By Alexandre Yersin with L.C.A. Calmette and A. Borrel.

Ann. Inst. Pasteur, 9, 589-92, 1895.

Successful inoculation of animals with anti-plague vaccine. 



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans)
  • 5128

Ueber die Pestepidemie in Formosa.

Zbl. Bakt., Abt. I, 21, 769-77, 1897.

Ogata considered the flea (principally Xenopsylla cheopis) to be the principal, if not the sole, vector of bubonic plague infection.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans), PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 5128.1

La propagation de la peste.

Ann. Inst. Pasteur, 12, 625-87, 1898.

Simond provided substantial evidence to support Ogata that fleas transmitted plague from rat to man.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans), PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 5129

Les inoculations antipesteuses.

Bull. Inst. Pasteur, 4, 825-40, 1906.

Haffkine developed an anti-bubonic plague vaccine (killed bouillon cultures), for use in man.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans)
  • 5129.1

Observations on the mechanism of the transmission of plague by fleas.

J. Hyg. (Camb.), Plague Suppl. 3, 423-39, 1914.

Bacot and Martin demonstrated the method by which the rat flea (primarily Xenopsylla cheopis) transmits the plague bacillus from rat to man.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans)
  • 5130

A treatise on pneumonic plague.

Geneva: League of Nations, 1926.

Publication of the League of Nations, III. Health III, 13.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans)
  • 5131

Plague.

Geneva: World Health Organization, 1954.

Includes a section on the history of plague. WHO Monograph Series, No. 22.



Subjects: Global Health, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans), INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 5132

Pestilentia in nummis.

Tübingen: H. Laupp, 1882.

A study of medals and tokens relating to epidemics of plague and other infectious diseases.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of, Numismatics, Medical
  • 5135

Pestblätter des XV. Jahrhunderts. Hrsg. von P. Heitz, mit einleitendem Text von W.L. Scheiber.

Strassburg, Austria: Heitz u. Mündel, 1901.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 1681
  • 5112
  • 5136

Abhandlungen aus der Seuchengeschichte und Seuchenlehre. Pt. 1: Die Pest. Pt. 2: Die Cholera. 2 vols. in 3.

Giessen: A. Töpelmann, 19081912.


Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 5137

La peste de 1720 à Marseille et en France d’après des documents inédits.

Paris: Perrin & Cie, 1911.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 5138

Plague and pestilence in literature and art.

Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1914.

Deals with the subject up to the end of the 18th century. Revised ed., 1951.



Subjects: ART & Medicine & Biology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 5140

Remèdes contre la peste. Facsimilés, notes et liste bibliographique des incunables sur la peste.

Paris: Droz, 1925.

Includes facsimile reproduction of “La régime de l’epidémie et remède contre icelle” of Jean Jacme (Johannes Jacobi), [5115], together with the “Remède très utile contre fièvre pestilencieuse” by the same writer. See No. 5115.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › 15th Century (Incunabula) & Medieval, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 5141

Die ersten gedruckten Pestschriften.

Munich: Verlag der Münchener Druck, 1926.

Includes descriptions of 130 incunabula.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › 15th Century (Incunabula) & Medieval, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 5142

The plague in Shakespeare’s London.

Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1927.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology › Drama › Shakespeare
  • 5142.1

The black death and men of learning.

New York: Columbia University Press, 1931.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 5143

Conquest of plague. A study of the evolution of epidemiology.

Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1953.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 5145

A history of bubonic plague in the British Isles.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1970.

From The Great Pestilence of 1348 to the Plague of London in 1665, discussing efforts to control the disease, and its impacts on social and economic life. 



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 5145.1

The black death in the Middle East.

Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1977.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Middle East, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 5145.2

Bubonic plague in early modern Russia: Public health & urban disaster.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1980.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Russia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 22
  • 2433
  • 3162
  • 3163
  • 3612
  • 3925
  • 4484
  • 4510
  • 4808
  • 4915
  • 5046
  • 5089
  • 5146

Тα ∑ωζομενα. The extant works of Aretaeus, the Cappadocian. Edited and translated by Francis Adams.

London: Sydenham Society, 1856.

Aretaeus left many fine descriptions of disease; in fact Garrison ranks him second only to Hippocrates in this respect. In the printed editions of this bibliography, before the present online version, the Adams edition was cited no less than 12 times for individual diseases, plus its first citation in "Collected Works" (No. 22.) This number of citations is, of course, greater than any other specific work by any other author, though the number of citations may be a reflection of idiosyncracies of the compilers rather than a proportionate measure of the significance of Aretaeus in the history of medicine. The citations are as follows:

 

3162. On angina, or quinsey. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams, 249-52, 404-07.

3163. On pleurisy. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams, 255-58, 410-16.

2433. On elephas, or elephantiasis. In his Extant works, ed. by F. Adams, 366-73, 494-98. Classic description of “elephantiasis Aretaei”, nodous leprosy.

5046. On ulcerations about the tonsils. In hiis Extant works, ed. F. Adams, 253-55. Aretaeus’s description of ulcerations about the tonsils, which he called “ulcera Syrica”, clearly referred to diphtheria, of which it was the first unmistakable description. For his treatment of the disease, see pp. 409-10 of the same work.

5089. On dysentery. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams. 353-57. Prior to Lösch’s discovery of E. histolytica, all forms of dysentery were differentiated only on clinical grounds.

4915. Extant works. Ed. F. Adams. Aretaeus wrote important accounts of melancholy (298-300, 473-78) and madness (301-04).

5146. On tetanus. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams,  246-49, 400-04. Aretaeus left a full account of tetanus.

4484,  On arthritis and sciatica. In his Extant works, ed. by F. Adams,  362-65, 492-93,

3612. On jaundice, or icterus. In his Extant works, ed F. Adams, 324-28.

4510. On paralysis. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams.

4808. On epilepsy, in his Extant works, ed F. Adams,  243, 296, 399, 468. Aretaeus was well acquainted with hemi-epilepsy from local injury in the opposite half of the brain; partly from this knowledge he formulated the “decussation in the form of the letter X” of the motor path. He first described epilepsy resulting from a depressed fracture of the skull. In his excellent description he made the first mention of the aura.

3925. On diabetes.In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams. 338-40, 485-86. The first accurate account of diabetes, to which Aretaeus gave its present name; he insisted on the part which thirst plays in the symptomatology. 

According to the Wikipedia article on Headache, Aretaeus also provied the first recorded classification system for headaches: "He made a distinction between three different types of headache: i) cephalalgia, by which he indicates a shortlasting, mild headache; ii) cephalea, referring to a chronic type of headache; and iii) heterocrania, a paroxysmal headache on one side of the head." 

Digital facsimile of Adams's Greek and Latin edition from the Internet Archive at this link.

 



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, Collected Works: Opera Omnia, HEPATOLOGY › Diseases of the Liver, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Bacillary Dysentery, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leprosy, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Tetanus, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Lymphatic Filariasis (Elephantiasis), Medicine: General Works, Metabolism & Metabolic Disorders › Diabetes, NEUROLOGY › Chronic Pain › Headache, NEUROLOGY › Chronic Pain › Sciatica, NEUROLOGY › Epilepsy, NEUROLOGY › Paralysis, PSYCHIATRY, RESPIRATION › Respiratory Diseases, RHEUMATOLOGY › Arthritis
  • 5147

Studio experimentale sull’ eziologia del tetano.

G. r. Accad. Med. Torino, 3 ser., 32, 174-80, 1884.

Demonstration of the transmissibility of tetanus by inoculation into rabbits of pus from a human case.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Tetanus
  • 5148

Ueber infectiösen Tetanus.

Dtsch. med. Wschr., 10, 842-44, 1884.

The discovery of the tetanus bacillus, Clostridum tetani, is attributed to Nicolaier; he was, however, unable to isolate the organism in pure culture.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Clostridium, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Tetanus
  • 5149

Ueber den Tetanusbacillus.

Z. Hyg. InfektKr., 7, 225-34, 1889.

Kitasato obtained a pure culture of the tetanus bacillus, Cl. tetani.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Clostridium, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Tetanus
  • 2544
  • 5060
  • 5150

Ueber das Zustandekommen der Diphtherie-Immunität und der Tetanus-Immunität bei Thieren.

Dtsch. med. Wschr., 16, 1113-14, 1890.

Antitoxins and their immunizing powers were discovered when Behring and Kitasato published their paper dealing with immunity to tetanus and diphtheria. This work laid the foundation of all future treatment with antitoxins, and was the basis of serotherapy. The paper was reprinted in the same journal, 1940, 66, 1348-49. Part 2, which deals with diphtheria, is by Behring alone. Behring was the first recipient (1901) of the Nobel Prize for Medicine. English translation in Bibel, Milestones in immunology (1988).

 



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Toxin-Antitoxin, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Tetanus
  • 5151

Sur la valeur et la durée de l’immunité conférée par l’anatoxine tétanique dans la vaccination de l’homme contre le tétanos.

C. R. Soc. Biol. (Paris), 112, 347-50, 1933.

Tetanus toxoid first employed in the immunization of humans.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Tetanus
  • 5152

Mémoire sur la morve.

Hist. Soc. roy. Med. (Paris), (1779), 3, pt. 2, 361-91, 1782.

Chabert, the most celebrated veterinarian of his time, left a fine account of glanders.



Subjects: VETERINARY MEDICINE › Glanders
  • 5153

On the glanders in the human subject.

Med.-chir. Trans., 16, 171-218; 18, 201-07, 1830, 1833.

Proof that glanders in the horse is communicable to man.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Glanders
  • 5154

De la morve et du farcin chez l’homme.

Mém. Acad. roy. Méd. (Paris), 6, 625-873, 1837.

In this treatise on glanders and farcy in man Rayer showed that glanders is contagious, but is not a form of tuberculosis. Rayer began the work with a thoroughly documented historical chapter. Digital facsimile of the separate edition published from the journal, from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Glanders
  • 5156

Die Aetiologie der Rotzkrankheit.

Arb. k. GesundhAmte, 1, 141-98, 1886.

Discovery of Burkholderia mallei, causative organism of glanders. Preliminary notice in Dtsch. med. Wschr., 1882, 8, 707.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Burkholderia mallei, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Glanders, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5157

Sur un moyen de diagnostic rapide de la morve.

Arch. Méd. exp. Anat. path., 1, 460-62, 1889.

Straus reaction for the diagnosis of glanders.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Glanders, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5158

Observations sur la morve.

Arch. Méd. exp. Anat. path., 3, 619-45, 1891.

Mallein reaction for the diagnosis of glanders.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Glanders, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5159

An account of the discovery of a hitherto undescribed infective disease occurring among the population of Rangoon.

Indian med. Gaz., 47, 262-67, 1912.

First description of melioidosis. Together with C.S. Krishnaswami, Whitmore identified Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis (also known as "Whitmore's disease") in opium addicts in Rangoon in 1911. He differentiated it from Burkholderia mallei, the causative agent of glanders, by clinical and microbiological features.The organism isolated was subsequently named Pfeifferella whitmori by Stanton and Fletcher.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Burkholderia pseudomallei , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Myanmar, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Melioidosis
  • 5159.1

A form of pseudo-tuberculosis (melioidosis).

Studies Inst. Med. Res. Fed. Malay States, No. 14, 1917.

Stanton identified the bacillus of melioidosis and reproduced the disease in animals by feeding and inoculation of cultures.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Burkholderia pseudomallei , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Melioidosis, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5159.2

Melioidosis.

London: John Bale, 1932.

Studies from the Institute for Medical Research, F.M.S., No. 21. Stanton gave melioidosis its present name and, with Fletcher, wrote the authoritative work on the subject.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Melioidosis
  • 5160

Thesis de carbunculo.

Leiden: ex off. F. Moyardi, 1653.


Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Staphylococcus, DERMATOLOGY › Specific Dermatoses
  • 5161

Epistola… qua simul de anthrace, carbunculo, bubone et altauna, philologice disseritur.

Jena: typ. vid. Krebsianae, 1681.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Anthrax
  • 5162

Description et traitement du charbon dans les animaux.

Paris: De l'Imprimerie Royale, 1780.

First important clinical description of anthrax. For some time after the appearance of Chabert’s short book, the condition was known as “Chabert’s disease”. Chabert was Directeur & Inspecteur général of the Écoles Royales-Vétérinaires. Digital facsimile from BiuSanté at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Anthrax, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5163

Inoculation du sang de rate.

C. R. Soc. Biol. (Paris), 2, 141-44, 1850.

Rayer inoculated sheep with blood of other sheep dead of anthrax. Microscopically he saw the anthrax bacillus in the blood of the inoculated sheep. Rayer was associated with Davaine, who later, in Bull. Acad. Méd., 1875, 2 sér., 4, 581-84, said that he had written the above account and had sent it to Rayer for publication.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Bacillus › Bacillus anthracis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Anthrax, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5164

Mikroskopische und mikrochemische Untersuchung des Milzbrandblutes sowie über Wesen und Kurdes Milzbrandes.

Vjschr. gerichtl. öff. Med., 8, 103-14, 1855.

Pollender discovered the B. anthracis in 1849, but did not record this fact until 1855. He gave a more exact account of the organism than did Rayer (No. 5163).



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Bacillus › Bacillus anthracis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Anthrax, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5165

Recherches sur les infusoires du sang dans la maladie connue sous le nom de sang de rate.

C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris), 57, 220-23, 351-53, 1863.

Davaine showed that anthrax could be transmitted to sheep, horses, cattle, guinea-pigs, and mice, and that in such animals the bacilli did not appear in the blood until 4-5 hours before death.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Bacillus › Bacillus anthracis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Anthrax, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5166

Recherches sur la nature et la constitution anatomique de la pustule maligne.

C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris), 60, 1296-99, 1865.

Davaine was the first conclusively to prove that a definite disease (anthrax) was due to a definite micro-organism (B. anthracis), and was thus one of the first to prove the germ theory of disease. He showed that the virulence of anthrax was in proportion to the number of bacteria present.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Bacillus › Bacillus anthracis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Anthrax, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › GENERAL PRINCIPLES of Infection by Microorganisms, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5167

Die Aetiologie der Milzbrand-Krankheit, begründet auf die Entwicklungsgeschichte des Bacillus anthracis.

Beitr. Biol Pflanzen, 2, 277-310, 1876.

In 1876 Koch first obtained pure cultures of B. anthracis and described its complete life history. With Davaine (Nos. 5165-66) he did much to prove that infectious diseases are caused by living reproductive microorganisms. The paper also marks the beginning of exact knowledge of bacterial infectious diseases. It is reproduced with translation in Med. Classics, 1938, 2, 745-820. See also Nos. 2331 and 2536.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Bacillus › Bacillus anthracis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Anthrax, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › GENERAL PRINCIPLES of Infection by Microorganisms, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5168

Étude sur la maladie charbonneuse.

C. R. Soc. Biol. (Paris), 84, 900-06, 1877.

Pasteur confirmed Koch’s results regarding anthrax; with Joubert he carried the bacillus through 100 generations and succeeded in producing anthrax from the last, thus disposing of the idea of a separate virus.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Bacillus › Bacillus anthracis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Anthrax, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5169

Sur l’étiologie du charbon.

C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris), 91, 86-94, 1880.

First use of attenuated bacteria for therapeutic purposes. See also the same journal, 1881, 92, 1378-83.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Bacillus › Bacillus anthracis, IMMUNOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Anthrax, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5170

Sulla preparazione del siero anti-carbonchioso.

Riv. Ig. San. pubbl., 6, 841-43, 1895.

Specific anti-anthrax serum. German translation in Zbl. Bakt., 1895, 1 Abt., 18, 744-45.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Bacillus › Bacillus anthracis, IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Anthrax, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5171

La precipitina nella diagnosi del carbonchio ematico.

Clin. vet. (Milano), 34, 2-20, 1911.

Ascoli’s thermoprecipitin reaction for the diagnosis of anthrax. German translation in Zbl. Bakt., 1911, 1 Abt., 58, Orig., 63-70. Preliminary note in Patbologica, 1910, 3, 101.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Bacillus › Bacillus anthracis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Anthrax, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5172

Die bakteriologische Blutuntersuchung beim Milzbrand des Menschen.

Dtsch. Z. Chir., 112, 265-83, 1911.

Salvarsan first used in the treatment of anthrax.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Bacillus › Bacillus anthracis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Anthrax, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Chemotherapeutic Agents
  • 5172.1

The use of anthrax vaccines prepared from avirulent (uncapsulatec) variants of Bacillus anthracis.

Onderstepoort J. vet. Set, 13, 307-12 , 1939.

Nonencapsulated spore vaccine.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Bacillus › Bacillus anthracis, IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Anthrax, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5173

A plague-like disease of rodents.

Publ. Hlth. Bull. (Wash.), 43, 53-71, 1911.

Tularemia first recorded (in rodents).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Tularemia, PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 5174

Further observations on a plague-like disease of rodents with a preliminary note on the causative agent, Bacterium tularense.

J. infect. Dis., 10 61-72, 1912.

Isolation of Pasteurella tularensis, causal organism in tularemia.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Pasteurella, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Tularemia, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5175

Infection of man with Bacterium tularense

J. infect. Dis., 15, 331-40, 1914.

Wherry and Lamb were first to isolate P. tularensis from lesions in man.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Pasteurella, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Tularemia
  • 5176

Tularemia

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 84, 1243-50, 1925.

Francis demonstrated the transmission of tularemia to man from rodents through insects, particularly the deerfly. He gave the disease its present name; it is also called “Francis’s disease” by some writers.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Tularemia
  • 5177

Ueber Identität von “Yato-Byo” (Ohara’s disease) und “Tularämie”, sowie ihren Erreger.

Zbl. Bakt., Abt. 1, 117, 440-50, 1930.

In Japan tularemia is known as “Ohara’s disease”.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Japan, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Tularemia
  • 5178

Tularemia: Accurate and earlier diagnosis by means of the intradermal reaction.

J. infect. Dis., 51, 286-91., 1932.

Skin test for the diagnosis of tularemia. Digital facsimile from Jstor at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Tularemia
  • 5179

Serum treatment of tularemia.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 98, 552; 101, 1047-49, 1932, 1933.

Foshay devised a serum for the treatment of tularemia.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Tularemia
  • 5180

Streptomycin treatment of tularemia.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 130, 393-98, 1946.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Tularemia
  • 2262.1
  • 3712
  • 5180.1
  • 5449.5

Tratado de las siete enfermedades, de la inflammacion universal del higado, zirbo, pyloron, y riñones, y de la obstrucion, de la satiriasi, de la terciana y febre maligna, y passion hipocondriaca. Lleva otros tres tratados, del mal de Loanda, del guzano, y de las fuentes y sedales.

Lisbon: Pedro Craesbeeck...A costa del Autor, 1623.

The first important work on tropical diseases. Only six copies of the original edition of this book are known. It includes full accounts of malaria, typhoid, and scurvy, and the first accurate descriptions of yellow fever, amoebic hepatitis, dracontiasis, trichuriasis, and tungiasis. Abreu's description of scurvy was remarkably precise. He treated the disease with fresh milk and antiscorbutic syrups, particularly rose syrup- a rich natural source of ascorbic acid. For a study of the book see F. Guerra, Clio Medica, 1968, 1, 59-60. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Portugal, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Malaria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, NUTRITION / DIET › Deficiency Diseases › Scurvy, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 5181

De ipecacuanha novo Gallorum antidysenterico. Resp. C[hristophe] F[riedrich] Kneussel.

Giessen: typ. Mülleri, 1698.

There is evidence that amoebic dysentery was known to Hippocrates. The history of treatment begins with the use of ipecacuanha, the dried root of Cephaelis ipecacuanha, a plant from Brazil.  This was first mentioned as a remedy in Purchas’s Pilgrimes, 1625. 



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Ipecacuanha
  • 1843
  • 5182

Mémoire sur l’émétine, et sur les trois espèces d’ipecacuanha.

J. gén. Méd. Chir. Pharm., 59, 223-31, 1817.

Isolation of emetine. It was not until a century later that Vedder demonstrated its value in the treatment of amoebiasis. Also during 1817 Magendie and Pelletier published "Recherches chimiques et physiologiques sur l’ipécacuanha," Ann. Chim. Phys. (Paris), 4, 172-85. 

 

 

 



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Ipecacuanha
  • 5182.1

Practical observations on fever, dysentery and liver complaints as they occur amongst European troops in India. With introductory remarks on the disadvantages of selecting boys for Indian military service.

Edinburgh: David Brown and A. Constable & London: Anderson and Chase, and Black and Parry, 1818.

Ballingall distinguished between amoebic and bacillary dysentery. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Bacillary Dysentery, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE
  • 5183

Hospital facts and observations.

London: Burgess & Hill, 1830.

First record (p. 149) of the use of emetine in the treatment of amoebiasis.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis
  • 5183.1

Fragments d’helminthologie et de physiologie microscopique.

Bull. Soc. imp. Nat. Moscou, 22, 549-73, 1849.

First observations of entozoic amoebae.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis, PARASITOLOGY › Amoeba
  • 5183.2

Clinica médica. Abcesos del higado.

México: M. Murguia, 1856.

Jimenez gave a classic account of liver abscess in amoebiasis.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, HEPATOLOGY › Diseases of the Liver, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis, PARASITOLOGY › Amoeba
  • 5184

Massenhafte Entwickelung von Amöben im Dickdarm.

Virchows Arch. path. Anat., 65, 196-211, 1875.

Lösch discovered Entamoeba histolytica as the infective agent in amoebic dysentery. Before this time distinction between the different forms of dysentery had been made on purely clinical grounds. English translation in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis, PARASITOLOGY › Amoeba
  • 2171
  • 5185
UNITED STATES. War Dept. Surgeon General

The medical and surgical history of the War of the Rebellion, 1861-65. 6 vols.

Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 18701888.

Written by Woodward, Smart, Otis, and Huntington under the direction of Joseph K. Barnes, Surgeon General of the Army. This massive, graphically illustrated set has been called the “first comprehensive American medical book”. It is one of the most remarkable works ever published on military medicine. An index of operators and reporters appears at the end of the third surgical volume. This index makes it possible to look up any surgeon, and find the patients he treated. 

Woodward published an account of diarrhoea and dysentery in Pt.2, Vol. 1 (1879) pp. 1-869. Garrison considered this the greatest single monograph on dysentery. Woodward saw the Lösch amoeba, but without recognizing its significance.

Appendix to Part I, Containing Reports of Medical Directors, and Other Documents includes on pp. 92-104, LXXXII. Extracts from a Report of the Operations of the Medical Department of the Army of the Potomac from July 4th to December 31st, 1862. By JONATHAN LETTERMAN, Surgeon, U. S. Army, Medical Director of the Army of the Potomac. (Digital text of Letterman's report is available from U.S. Army Medical Department Office of Medical History at this link.

 

 



Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE, American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE › History of U.S. Civil War Medicine, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Bacillary Dysentery, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Dysentery, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine
  • 5186

Zur Aetiologie der Dysenterie in Aegypten.

Virchows Arch. path. Anat., 105, 521-31, 1886.

Kartulis discovered amoebae in liver abscess. It was principally through the work of Kartulis that amoebae came to be considered the cause of dysentery in man.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Egypt, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis
  • 5186.1

O úplavici. Předběžné sđělení.

Cas. Lék. čes., 26, 70-74, 1887.

Hlava induced experimental amoebiasis in cats by intrarectal inoculation of stools. In an abstract of this paper Kartulis confused the author’s name with that of the title, a mistake copied by writers for many years; see C. Dobell, Parasitology, 1938, 30, 239-41.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis
  • 5187

Amoebic dysentery.

Johns Hopk. Hosp. Rep., 2, 395-548, 18901891.

These workers introduced the term “amoebic dysentery” in their important investigation of the condition.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis
  • 5188

Ueber Amöben-Enteritis.

Berl. Klin. Wschr., 30, 1089-94, 1893.

Entamoeba histolytica distinguished from Entamoeba coli. English translation in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis
  • 5189

Experiments undertaken to test the efficacy of the ipecac treatment of dysentery.

Bull. Manila med. Soc., 3, 48-53, 1911.

Vedder demonstrated the amoebicidal action of emetine; his work led to the general adoption of emetine in the treatment of amoebic dysentery.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Philippines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Ipecac, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Ipecac › Emetine
  • 5190

The rapid cure of amoebic dysentery and hepatitis by hypodermic injections of soluble salts of emetine.

Brit. med. J., 1, 1424-25, 1912.

Following up the work of Vedder, Rogers showed that the soluble salts of emetine could be safely injected subcutaneously. The general use of emetine, introduced by Rogers, diminished the incidence of liver abscess – a grave sequel.



Subjects: HEPATOLOGY › Diseases of the Liver, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Hepatitis
  • 5191

Experimental entamoebic dysentery.

Philipp. J. Sci., B, 8, 253-331, 1913.

Walker and Sellards made important additions to our knowledge of amoebiasis, including the determination of the incubation period and the demonstration that E. tetragena and E. minuta are identical with E. histolytica.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis
  • 5192

Ueber Behandlungsversuche der chronischen Amoebenruhr mit Yatren.

Münch, med. Wschr., 68, 802-03, 1921.

Introduction of Yatren.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis
  • 5193

Le stovarsol guérit rapidement la dysenterie amibienne.

Bull. Soc. Path. exot., 16, 79-81, 1923.

Introduction of stovarsol (oxyaminophenylarsenic acid) in the treatment of amoebiasis.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis
  • 5194

The cultivation of Endamoeba histolytica.

Amer. J. Hyg., 5, 371-407, 1925.

Pure cultivation of Entamoeba histolytica was first accomplished by D. W. Cutler (J. Path. Bact., 1918, 22, 22), but Boeck and Drbohlav evolved the first media upon which amoebae could be cultivated for indefinite periods.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis
  • 5194.1

Researches on the intestinal protozoa of monkeys and man.

Parasitology, 20, 357-412, 1928.

Classic account of the life-cycle of Entamoeba histolytica.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Dysentery, ZOOLOGY › Protistology (formerly Protozoology)
  • 5194.2

Carbarsone in the treatment of amebiasis.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 98, 189-94, 1932.

With H. H. Anderson and  N. A. David.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis
  • 5195

De morbis venereis libri sex.

Paris: G. Cavelier, 1736.

A comprehensive book on the subject, including a careful review of the existing literature. Astruc stated that syphilis first appeared in Europe in 1493. The book was translated into English in 1737. Digital facsimile of the 1736 edition from wellcomecollection.org at this link.

In 1740 Astruc issued the much-enlarged second edition expanded to two volumes. At the end of vol. 1, paginated in Roman numerals, he published Dissertatio I. De origine, appelatione, natura & curatione morborum venerorum inter Sinas, reproducing various Chinese characters with their explanations. This was probably the first Chinese treatise on venereal disease published in Europe. Digital facsimile of the second edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Chinese Medicine , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES
  • 5196

De gonorrhoea virulenta.

Edinburgh: Balfour, Auld & Smellie, 1767.

Balfour is said to have been the first to re-affirm the duality of gonorrhoea and syphilis.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Gonorrhoea & Trichomonas Infection
  • 2377
  • 5197

A treatise on the venereal disease.

London: Sold at No. 13, Castle Street, Leicester Square, 1786.

In Hunter's day venereal diseases were thought to be due to a single poison. To test this theory Hunter experimented with matter taken from a gonorrhoeal patient who, unknown to Hunter, also had syphilis. Hunter maintained that gonorrhoea and syphilis were caused by a single pathogen. Backed by the weight of his authority, this experiment retarded the development of knowledge regarding the two diseases. Contrary to legend, however, there is no proof that Hunter actually inoculated himself with venereal disease. The hard (“Hunterian”) chancre eponymizes Hunter; his book also contains the first suggestion of lymphogranuloma venereum as a separate disease, and this work also makes a major contribution to urological surgery. Hunter issued this book at his private press at his anatomy school, the address for which he provided on the title page. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Syphilis, UROLOGY
  • 5198

First lines of theory and practice in venereal diseases.

Edinburgh: C. Elliot, 1787.

First complete description of lymphatic chancre – “Nisbet’s chancre”.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES
  • 5199

Abhandlung über die venerische Krankheit. 3 vols.

Göttingen: J. C. Dieterich, 17881789.

Girtanner’s important textbook on the venereal diseases contains some history.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › History of Sexually Transmitted Diseases