An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15426 entries, 13280 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 20, 2021

Browse by Entry Number 5400–5499

137 entries
  • 5400

Rickettsialpox. A newly recognized rickettsial disease. IV. Isolation of a rickettsia apparently identical with the causative agent of rickettsialpox from Allodermanyssus sanguineus, a rodent mite.

Publ. Hlth. Rep. (Wash.), 61, 1677-82, 1946.

Isolation of Rickettsia akari, aetiologic agent of rickettsialpox. With W. L. Jellison and C. Pomerantz.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections
  • 5401

Kew Gardens spotted fever.

New York Med., 2, No. 15, 27-28, 1946.

Rickettsialpox described.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections
  • 1940
  • 5402

Chloromycetin, an antibiotic with chemotherapeutic activity in experimental rickettsial and viral infections.

Science, 106, 418-419, 1947.

Introduction of chloramphenicol, used in treatment of typhus.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Antibiotics, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 5402.1

Serological evidence of Q fever in Great Britain.

Lancet, 1, 178-79, 1949.

Relationship of primary atypical pneumonia and Q fever.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Pneumonia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections
  • 5403

Rats, lice and history: being a study in biography, which, after 12 preliminary chapters indispensable for the preparation of the lay reader, deals with the life history of typhus fever.

Boston, MA: Little, Brown, 1935.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › History of Infectious Disease, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health
  • 2527.99
  • 5404

De variolis et morbillis commentarius.

London: G. Bowyer, 1766.

The first medical description of smallpox was written by Rhazes, about the year 910… The above work is the first edition of the Arabic text with a parallel Latin translation by the English pharmacist and scholar, John Channing, concerning whom see E. Savage-Smith, "John Channing: Eighteenth-century apothecary and arabist," Pharmacy in history, 30 (1988) 63-80. For an English translation see Medical Classics, 1939, 4, 22-84. A translation was also published by the Sydenham Society, 1848. See Nos. 2527 & 5441. In his Treatise on the smallpox and measles, Rhazes stated that survival from smallpox infection prevented an individual from ever acquiring the disease again. His explanation for why the disease does not strike the same individual twice is the first theory of acquired immunity.

 



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 5405

Globus vitulinus.

Misc. Curiosa sive Ephem. nat. cur., Jenae, 2, 181-82, 1671.

First authentic report on variolation.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation
  • 5406

A brief rule to guide the common-people of New-England how to order themselves and theirs in the small pocks, or measels.

Boston, MA: J. Foster, 1677.

The first medical publication of North America and the only one to appear in the 17th century. Only one copy of the original printing of this broadside survived, written by Thacher, a Boston minister.  The sheet was reprinted, with a bibliographical and biographical study of the reprints done in 1702 and 1721-22, by Henry R. Viets. (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, 1937).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northeast, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox
  • 5407

Observationes medicae circa morborum acutorum historiam et curationem. Ed. quarta.

London: G. Kettilby, 1685.

Contains (Book 3, Cap. 2; Book 5, Cap. 4) an important account of smallpox, particularly the epidemics of 1667-69 and 1674-75. Sydenham attributed smallpox to a specific inflammation of the blood; he clearly distinguished it from measles. His treatment of fevers with fresh air and cooling drinks was an improvement on the sweating methods previously employed. English translation in his Works, ed. R. G. Latham, London, 1848, 1, 123, 219.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox
  • 5409

An account, or history, of the procuring of the smallpox by incision or inoculation, as it has for some time been practised at Constantinople.

Phil. Trans., 29, 72-82, 17141716.

A letter dated December, 1713 from Timoni of Constantinople to John Woodward, and read to the Royal Society in May, 1714, described the practice in that city of inoculation against smallpox. The letter aroused interest in inoculation in England. A fellow of the Royal Society since 1703, Timoni was the first to write on this subject for Western physicians, although Pylarini’s researches had commenced in 1701.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation
  • 5409.1

Nova et tuta variolas excitandi per transplantationem methodus; nuper inventa & in usum tracta: Qua rite peracta, immunia in posterum praeservantur ab huiusmodi contagio corpora.

Venice: Giovanni Gabriele Hertz, 1715.

Inoculation was practiced in ancient times. In 1701 Pilarino inoculated three children at Constantinople with smallpox virus. He is credited with the “medical” discovery of variolation, and is thus the first immunologist. His book records his many researches on the subject.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation
  • 5410

Nova & tuta variolas excitandi per transplantationem methodus, nuper inventa & in usum tracta.

Phil. Trans., 29, 393-99, 17141716.

This reprint of No. 5409.1 appeared in the same volume as Timoni’s paper. Both were republished in Latin: Tractatus bini de nova variolas per transplantationem excitandi methodo, Leyden, 1721. Digital facsimile of 1721 edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation
  • 5410.1

Some account of what is said of inoculating or transplanting the small pox by the learned Dr. Emmanuel Timonius, and Jacobus Pylarinus. With some remarks theron. To which are added, a few queries in answer to the scruples of many about the lawfulness of this method.

Boston, MA: S. Gerrish, 1721.

An abridgement of Nos. 5409 & 5410 together with Boylston’s remarks. From internal evidence this 24-page pamphlet would appear to be the first North American publication on inoculation. See No. 5415. Digital facsimile of the incomplete U.S. NLM copy from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northeast, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 5411

Some observations on the new method of receiving the smallpox by ingrafting or inoculating.

Boston, MA: B. Green, for S. Gerrish, 1721.

This work offers general support for the practice of Zabdiel Boylston, detailing some of Boylston’s cases, including accounts of occasions when patients died. Reprinted with additional material by Daniel Neal, as A narrative of the method and success of inoculating the small-pox in New England, by Mr. Benj. Colman…London, 1722.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northeast, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 5412

Inoculation of the smallpox as practised in Boston.

Boston, MA: J. Franklin, 1722.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northeast, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 5413

The abuses and scandals of some late pamphlets in favour of inoculation of the small-pox.

Boston, MA: J. Franklin, 1722.

Douglass at first opposed inoculation for smallpox, but by 1730 he had changed his views and had become an advocate of inoculation.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 5414

An account of the method and success of inoculating the small pox in Boston in New England.

London: Peele, 1722.

Mather republished reports of earlier writers on inoculation. He persuaded Boylston to adopt the practice in June 1721, and he supported Boylston during a period of great opposition to inoculation.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northeast, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 5414.1

Mr. Maitland’s account of inoculating the small pox.

London: For the author by J. Downing, 1722.

Maitland inoculated the children of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu in 1721, and also inoculated six condemned prisoners as part of the so-called “Royal Experiment”. Success with these trials lead to his inoculation of the children of the Prince of Wales, and to the popularization of inoculation in England.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation
  • 5415

An historical account of the small-pox inoculated in New-England, upon all sorts of persons, whites, blacks, and of all ages and constitutions: With some account of the nature of the infection in the natural and inoculated way, and their different effects on human bodies; with some short directions to the unexperienced in this method of practice .

London: S. Chandler, 1726.

Boylston was the first in America to inoculate for smallpox, at Boston on 26 June 1721. 

"During a smallpox outbreak in 1721 in Boston, he inoculated about 248 people[5] by applying pus from a smallpox sore to a small wound on the subjects, a method said to have been previously used in Africa. Initially, he used the method on two slaves and his own son, who was 13 at the time. This was the first introduction of inoculations to the United States. An African slave named Onesimus taught the idea to Cotton Mather, the influential New England Puritan minister.

"His method was initially met by hostility and outright violence from other physicians, and many threats were made on his life, with some even threatening to hang him on the nearest tree. He was forced to hide in a private place of his house for 14 days, a secret known only by his wife. During this hostility, his family was also in a dangerous situation. His wife and children were sitting in their home and a lighted hand-grenade was thrown into the room, but the fuse fell off before an explosion could take place. Even after the violence had subsided, he visited his patients only at midnight and while disguised.[6] After his initial inoculations of his son and two slaves, he was arrested for a short period of time for it (he was later released with the promise not to inoculate without government permission). In 1724, with a letter of introduction to Dr. James Jurin by Cotton Mather[7] , Boylston traveled to London, where he published his results as Historical Account of the Small-Pox Inoculated in New England, and became a fellow of the Royal Society two years later. Afterward, he returned to Boston" (Wikipedia article on Zabdiel Boylston, accessed 03-2018).

The second edition was published in Boston in 1730. Digital facsimile of the second edition preserved in the U.S. National Library of Medicine, from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Ethnology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 5416

An essay on inoculation, occasioned by the small-pox being brought into South Carolina in the year 1738.

London: J. Huggonson, 1743.

After its initial popularity, inoculation fell into disuse in England. Kirkpatrick, who became a prominent inoculator in England after experience in America, helped considerably in reviving its popularity. He attempted the attenuation of the virus by his arm-to-arm method of inoculation.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › South Carolina
  • 5417

De variolis et morbillis liber.

London: J. Brindley, 1747.

Includes a Latin translation of Rhazes’s commentary on smallpox. Mead favored inoculation, and his great authority and influence contributed to a more general acceptance of this measure. English translation entitled A discourse on the small pox and measles, London, 1748.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox
  • 5418

A discourse on the preparation of the body for the small-pox; and the manner of receiving the infection.

Philadelphia: B. Franklin & D. Hall, 1750.

Thomson, a physician in Philadelphia, was the originator of the American method of inoculation against smallpox. Printed by Benjamin Franklin. Digital facsimile from dla.library.upenn.edu at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation
  • 5419

Some account of the success of inoculation for the small-pox in England and America. Together with plain instructions, by which any person may be enabled to perform the operation.

London: W. Strahan, 1759.

Franklin’s statistical account of smallpox inoculation in Boston during the epidemic of 1753-54, showing the beneficial effects of the practice, was written for William Heberden, who contributed the “Plain instructions” mentioned on the title. Early in his life Franklin had actively opposed inoculation but he became one of its strongest advocates after the tragic death of his son from smallpox in 1736.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 5420

The present method of inoculating for the small-pox.

London: W. Owen, 1767.

Dimsdale is notable as having inoculated Catherine of Russia and her son. For this he received a fee of £10,000 and a life pension. His reputation and the exalted rank of his patient helped in popularizing the measure in England. Dimsdale used material from the inoculated site of another patient.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation
  • 5421

Account of a woman who had the smallpox during pregnancy, and who seemed to have communicated the same disease to the foetus.

Phil. Trans., 70, 128-42, 1780.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox , OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS
  • 5422

The new method in inoculating for the small pox.

Philadelphia: C. Cist, 1781.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Variolation or Inoculation, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Pennsylvania
  • 2529.3
  • 5423

An inquiry into the causes and effects of the variolae vaccinae.

London: S. Low, 1798.

Jenner established the fact that a “vaccination” or inoculation with vaccinia (cowpox) lymph matter protects against smallpox. He performed his first vaccination on May 14, 1796. The above work, describing 23 successful vaccinations, announced to the world one of the greatest triumphs in the history of medicine. Jennerian vaccination soon superseded the protective inoculation of material from human cases of small-pox, which had previously been in vogue. What is probably the first mention of anaphylaxis appears on p. 13 of the pamphlet. See W.R. Lefanu, A Bio-bibliography of Edward Jenner, 1749-1823, rev. 2nd. ed., Winchester, St. Paul’s Bibliographies, 1985. Several facsimile editions have been published. As a result of the success of Jenner’s vaccine natural smallpox was eradicated. The official declaration was made by the World Health Organization on May 8, 1980. See No. 5434.2. 



Subjects: ALLERGY › Anaphylaxis, IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Vaccination
  • 5424

A prospect of exterminating the small-pox, being the history of the variolae vaccinae, or kine-pox, commonly called the cow-pox; as it has appeared in England: With an account of a series of inoculations performed for the kine-pox in Massachusetts. [Part II:] A prospect of exterminating the small pox part II, being a continuation of a narrative of facts concerning the progress of the new inoculation in America; together with practical observations on the local appearance, symptoms, and mode of treating the variola vaccina, or kine pock; including some letters to the author, from distinguished characters, on the subject of this benign remedy, now passing with a rapid step through all ranks of society in Europe and America.

Cambridge, MA: William Hilliard & University Press, 18001802.

Waterhouse introduced Jennerian vaccination into the U.S.A. He vaccinated his own child as his first case. See J. B. Blake, Benjamin Waterhouse and the introduction of vaccination. A reappraisal. Philadelphia, 1957. Digital facsimile of pt 1 from U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link; of part 2 from wellcomecollection.org at this link.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Vaccination, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 5425

Practical observations on vaccination: or inoculation for the cow pock.

Philadelphia: J. Humphreys, 1802.

Coxe did much to destroy ignorant prejudice against vaccination; he was the first in Philadelphia to practice it. Like Waterhouse, he inoculated his own child as his first case.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northeast, IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Vaccination
  • 5425.1

Nature des virus vaccin. Détermination expérimentale des éléments qui constituent le principe virulent dans le pus varioleux et le pus morveux.

C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris), 66, 359-63, 1868.

Chauveau first used the term “elementary bodies” to describe the minute bodies inside the inclusions and which were the infective particles.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox
  • 5426

Anatomische Beiträge zur Lehre von den Pocken. 2 pts.

Wroclaw (Vratislava, Breslau): M. Cohn & Weigert, 18741875.

In the course of his important studies on smallpox, Weigert carried out the first successful staining of bacteria (see No. 2482). His fine description of the destructive effects of the smallpox virus on the skin led to the coining of the term “coagulation necrosis” as a name for the process causing the development of the lesions.



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox
  • 5427

The life-history of the micro-organisms associated with variola and vaccinia. An abstract of results obtained from a study of smallpox and vaccination in the surgical laboratory of the University of Edinburgh.

Proc. roy. Soc. Edinb., 13, 603-20, 1886.

The “Paschen elementary bodies” (No. 5430) were first recognized and demonstrated by Buist. Republished as an appendix to his Vaccinia and variola, London, 1887.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox , VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Variola and Vaccinia
  • 5428

Ricerche sulla patogenesi ed etiologia dell’ infezione vaccinica e vaiolosa.

Arch. Sci. méd., 16, 403-24, 1893.

Guamieri described bodies found in the specific lesions of smallpox. Cytorrhyctes variolae guarnieri, which he believed to be the causative organism of the disease. Guarnieri bodies are found in all poxvirus infections and their presence is diagnostic.[4] 



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox , VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Variola and Vaccinia
  • 5429

Vaccination, its natural history and pathology.

London: Macmillan, 1899.

Milroy Lectures, Royal College of Physicians, 1898. Copeman’s bacteriological studies permanently determined the validity of vaccination as a preventive of smallpox.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Vaccination
  • 5429.1

On experimental variola in the monkey.

J. med. Res., 11, 230-46, 1904.

Inoculation of smallpox into the monkey. An earlier report of successful inoculation by W. Zuelzer (Zbl. med. Wiss., 1874, 12, 82) is not generally accepted.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Vaccination
  • 5430

Was wissen wir über den Vakzineerreger?

Münch, med. Wschr., 53, 2391-93, 1906.

“Paschen elementary bodies”; see also No. 5427.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox
  • 5430.1

Pure cultivation in vivo of vaccine virus free from bacteria.

J. exp. Med., 21, 539-70, 1915.

Noguchi obtained a pure culture of vaccinia virus.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox , VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Variola and Vaccinia
  • 5431

Zur Differentialdiagnose der Variola und der Varicellen. Die Erscheinungen an der variolierten Hornhaut des Kaninchens und ihre frühzeitige Erkennung.

Zbl. Bakt., I Abt., 75, Orig., 518-24, 1915.

Paul’s test for the diagnosis of smallpox.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox
  • 5432

Studies of the viruses of vaccinia and variola.

London: H. M. Stationery Office, 1925.

Medical Research Council Special Report No. 98; a summary of the more important additions to the knowledge of the subject.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox , VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Variola and Vaccinia
  • 5433

Studies on variola, vaccinia, and avian molluscum.

J. State Med., 34, 125-43, 1926.

Ledingham’s diagnostic test.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox , VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Variola and Vaccinia
  • 5434

The reaction of the skin of the normal rabbit following intradermal injection of material from smallpox lesions: the specificity of this reaction and its application as a diagnostic test.

Amer. J. Hyg., 8, 93-106, 1928.

McKinnon’s diagnostic test.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox , Laboratory Medicine › Diagnostic Skin Tests
  • 5434.1

Cultivation of vaccinia virus without tissue culture.

Lancet, 2, 596-97, 1928.

Introduction of “Maitland’s medium”.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox , VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Variola and Vaccinia, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 5434.2

The global eradication of smallpox. Final report of the Global Commission for the Certification of Smallpox Eradication

Geneva: World Health Organization, 1980.

On 8 May 1980, the World Health Organization officially announced that “smallpox eradication has been achieved throughout the world”. The upper cover of this report reproduces an electron micrograph of a specimen of variola virus taken from the last case of endemic smallpox in the world, 26 October 1977. This was the successful conclusion of worldwide vaccination efforts initiated by Jenner in 1798. See No. 5423.



Subjects: Global Health, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › Vaccination, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Variola and Vaccinia
  • 5435

History and pathology of vaccination. 2 vols.

London: H. K. Lewis, 1889.

This very full history of the subject caused a good deal of controversy; see the review of it in Lancet, 1890, 1, 470-72. Crookshank was an opponent of vaccination.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › History of Smallpox
  • 5435.1

A concise history of small-pox and vaccination in Europe.

London: H. K. Lewis, 1902.

A comprehensive summary, in tabular form.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › History of Smallpox
  • 5436

The historic evolution of variolation.

Johns Hopk. Hosp. Bull., 24, 69-83, 1913.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › History of Smallpox
  • 5436.1

The adoption of inoculation for smallpox in England and France.

Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1957.

The appendices contain the early histories of inoculation and a list of German doctoral dissertations on inoculation, 1720-52. There is also an excellent bibliography.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › History of Smallpox
  • 5436.2

Princes and peasants: Smallpox in history.

Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1983.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › History of Smallpox
  • 5073
  • 5437

De tumoribus praeter naturam.

Naples: Octavio Idusmadi, 1553.

This treatise on tumors includes (p. 194) the first known description of an epidemic disease resembling scarlet fever. This was a malady prevalent in Italy, and was commonly called rossania or rossalia. Ingrassia was first to differentiate varicella (chicken pox) from scarlet fever (pp. 194-95). Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Chickenpox, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever, ONCOLOGY & CANCER
  • 5438

On the chickenpox.

Med. Trans. Coll. Phys. Lond., 1, 427-36, 1768.

In a paper read before the (Royal) College of Physicians on 11 August 1767, Heberden first definitely differentiated chickenpox from smallpox.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Chickenpox, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox
  • 5439

On gangrenous eruptions in connection with vaccination and chickenpox.

Med.-chir. Trans., 65, 1-12, 1882.

Original description of varicella gangrenosa.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Chickenpox
  • 5439.1

Das Auftreten von Varizellen unter eigentümlichen Verhältnissen.

Magy. orv. Arch., (Nov. 3), 1892.

Bokay was the first to suggest an etiological relationship between varicella and herpes zoster. See also his paper in Wien. klin. Wschr., 1909, 22, 1323-26.



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY › Specific Dermatoses › Herpes Zoster (Shingles), INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Chickenpox, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Herpes › Herpes Zoster (Shingles), VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Herpesviridae › Varicella zoster virus
  • 5440

The histology of the skin lesions in varicella.

J. med. Res., 14, 361-92, 19051906.

Tyzzer was first to recognize inclusion bodies in varicella.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Microscopic Anatomy (Histology), DERMATOLOGY, DERMATOLOGY › Dermatopathology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Chickenpox, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Herpesviridae › Varicella zoster virus
  • 5440.1

Serial propagation in vitro of agents producing inclusion bodies derived from varicella and herpes zoster.

Proc. Soc. exp. Biol. (N. Y. J.), 83, 340-46, 1953.

Isolation of the varicella-herpes virus.



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY › Specific Dermatoses › Herpes Zoster (Shingles), INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Chickenpox, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Herpes › Herpes Zoster (Shingles), VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Herpesviridae › Varicella zoster virus
  • 5440.2

Prevention of varicella by zoster immune globulin.

New Engl. J. Med., 280, 1191-94, 1969.

With A. Ross, L. H. Miller, and B. Kuo.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Chickenpox
  • 5441

A treatise on the smallpox and measles. Translated from the Arabic by William Alexander Greenhill.

London: Sydenham Society, 1848.

Rhazes differentiated measles from smallpox. Reprinted in Med. Classics, 1939, 4, 22-84. For original publication see No. 5404. The first English translation appeared in No. 5417. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 2198
  • 5075
  • 5441.1

Observationes medicae circa morborum acutorum historiamet curationem.

London: G. Kettilby, 1676.

Sydenham recorded significant observations on dysentery, scarlet fever (p. 387), scarlatina, measles and other conditions. He stressed the clinical study of medicine and kept careful case records. Includes (pp. 272-80) the most minute and careful description of measles that had so far appeared; this is reprinted in Med. Classics, 1939, 4, 313-19.

English translation in No. 64 and prior English editions. The above book is really a third edition of his Methodus curandi febres, 1666; second edition, 1668. The Latin texts of both editions of Methodus curandi were reprinted, with Latham’s translation, an introduction and notes by G.G. Meynell, Folkstone, Winterdoum Books, 1987.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Dysentery, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever, Medicine: General Works
  • 5442

Medical facts and experiments.

London: A. Millar, 1759.

Experimental human transmission of measles (pp. 266-88). Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles
  • 5443

Iagttagelser, anstillede under Maeslinge-Epidemien paa Faerøerne i Aaret 1846.

Bibl. Laeger, 3 R., 1, 270-344, 1847.

When only 26 years of age, Panum was sent by the Danish Government to investigate the epidemic of measles then raging in the Faroe Islands. His report on the subject was a valuable contribution to medical literature. A translation of his papers is in Med. Classics, 1939, 3, 829-86. It was also published in translation by the Delta Omega Society, New York, 1940.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Denmark, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles
  • 5444

The diagnosis of the invasion of measles from a study of the exanthema as it appears on the buccal mucous membrane.

Arch. Pediat., 13, 918-22, 1896.

Koplik, American pediatrician, was the first to note and report on “Koplik’s spots”, the buccal spots which are an important early diagnostic sign in measles.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles, PEDIATRICS
  • 5445

Recherches expérimentales sur la transmissibilité de la rougeole animaux.

Méd. mod. (Paris), 9, 153, 1898.

Measles transmitted to animals.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles
  • 5446

Experimental measles.

J. infect. Dis., 2, 238-55, 1905.

Experimental human transmission of measles.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles
  • 5447

Alcune esperienze di sieroimmunizzazione e sieroterapia nel morbillo.

Riv. Clin. pediat., 5, 1017-25, 1907.

First use of convalescent serum in prophylaxis against measles.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles
  • 5448

Experimental measles in the monkey.

Publ. Hlth. Rep. (Wash.), 26, 847-48, 887-95, 1911.

Measles transmitted to monkeys.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles
  • 5449

Culture “in vitro” du virus de la rougeole.

Bull. Acad. Méd. (Paris), 119, 598-601, 1938.

Successful cultivation of measles virus.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles, VIROLOGY
  • 5449.1

Chemical, clinical, and immunological studies on the products of human plasma fractionation. XII. The use of concentrated normal human serum gamma globulin (human immune serum globulin) in the prevention and attenuation of measles.

J. clin. Invest., 23, 541-49, 1944.

Gamma globulin used for passive immunization against measles. With C. G. Jennings and C. A. Janeway.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles
  • 5449.2

Propagation in tissue cultures of cytopathogenic agents from patients with measles.

Proc. Soc. exp. Biol. (N.Y.), 86, 277-86, 1954.

Isolation of measles virus.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles, VIROLOGY
  • 5449.3

Propagation of measles virus in cultures of chick embryo cells.

Proc. Soc. exp. Biol. (N.Y.), 97, 23-29, 1958.

With M. V. Milovanovič.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles
  • 5449.4

Studies on an attenuated measles-virus vaccine. I. Development and preparation of the vaccine: technics for assay of effects of vaccination.

New Engl. J. Med, 263, 153-59, 1960.

Live virus vaccine. With M. V. Milovanovič, and A. Holloway.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles
  • 2262.1
  • 3712
  • 5180.1
  • 5449.5

Tratado de las siete enfermedades, de la inflammacion universal del higado, zirbo, pyloron, y riñones, y de la obstrucion, de la satiriasi, de la terciana y febre maligna, y passion hipocondriaca. Lleva otros tres tratados, del mal de Loanda, del guzano, y de las fuentes y sedales.

Lisbon: Pedro Craesbeeck...A costa del Autor, 1623.

The first important work on tropical diseases. Only six copies of the original edition of this book are known. It includes full accounts of malaria, typhoid, and scurvy, and the first accurate descriptions of yellow fever, amoebic hepatitis, dracontiasis, trichuriasis, and tungiasis. Abreu's description of scurvy was remarkably precise. He treated the disease with fresh milk and antiscorbutic syrups, particularly rose syrup- a rich natural source of ascorbic acid. For a study of the book see F. Guerra, Clio Medica, 1968, 1, 59-60. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Portugal, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Amoebiasis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Malaria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, NUTRITION / DIET › Deficiency Diseases › Scurvy, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 5450

Histoire générale des Antilles habités par les Français. Tom. 1.

Paris, 1667.

Du Tertre, a priest, described (pp. 81, 99, 423) the outbreaks of yellow fever at Guadeloupe in 1635, 1640, and 1648.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Caribbean, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 5451

A short account of the malignant fever, lately prevalent in Philadelphia: With a statement of the proceedings that took place on the subject in different parts of the United States.

Philadelphia: The Author, 1793.

Carey was a Philadelphia publisher and economist rather than a physician. In this little book, which passed through four editions in a few months, Carey left a graphic description of the great yellow fever epidemic of Philadelphia in 1793, which infected about 17,000 people and left 5000 people dead, out of a population estimated at 45,000-50,000. Carey gave a good clinical description of the disease, mentioning the efficacy and the failure of many forms of treatment. Regrettably Carey accused blacks of causing the epidemic and of taking advantage of victims while acting as nurses. Wide distribution of the pamphlet contributed to fears and hostility in the city in which members of the Free African Society had risked their lives as nurses and aides to the sick and dying. Digital facsimile of the third edition, 1793, from the Internet Archive at this link.

To the fourth edition of January 16, 1794 Carey appended the following: "Acounts of the plague in London and Marseilles; and a list of the dead, from August 1, to the middle of December, 1793." Digital facsimile of the 4th edition from the Internet Archive at this link.

 



Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Pennsylvania
  • 5452

A description of the malignant, infectious fever prevailing at present in Philadelphia; with an account of the means to prevent infection, and the remedies and method of treatment, which have been found most successful.

Philadelphia: T. Dobson, 1793.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Pennsylvania
  • 5453

An account of the bilious remitting yellow fever, as it appeared in the city of Philadelphia in the year 1793.

Philadelphia: T. Dobson, 1794.

Benjamin Rush was the most eminent figure in Philadelphia medicine in his day. His description of the yellow fever epidemic of 1793 is classic. He did magnificent work in treating the sick during the epidemic and in proposing measures to prevent a recurrence. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Pennsylvania
  • 5453.1

A narrative of the proceedings of the black people during the late awful calamity in Philadelphia, in the year 1793: and a refutation of some censures thrown upon them in some late publications.

Philadelphia: Printed for the authors by William W. Woodward, 1794.

A refutation of slights by Matthew Carey in his Short account of the malignant fever, lately prevalent in Philadelphia (1793; No. 5451) to the important contributions of black people, many of whom served as nurses and gravediggers during the epidemic. The Narrative is followed by a letter to Mattthew Clarkson, mayor of Philadelphia, signed by Jones and Allen, with Clarkson's reply. One of the earliest medical publications written by African Americans; both Allen and Jones were black ministers in Philadelphia. Digital facsimile from the National Library of Medicine, Internet Archive, at this link.



Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, PUBLIC HEALTH, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Pennsylvania
  • 5454

Yellow fever contrasted with bilious fever – reasons for believing it a disease sui generis – its mode of propagation – remote cause – probable insect or animalcular origin.

New Orleans med. surg. J., 4, 563-601, 1848.

Nott advanced the theory that yellow fever was caused by minute animalcula. Reproduced in part in R. H. Major, Classic descriptions of disease, 3rd ed., 1945, p. 122.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever
  • 5454.1

Fiebre amarilla.

Gaceta Oficial de Cumaná, Año 4, No. 57, Mayo 23 , 1854.

Beauperthuy was the first protagonist of the mosquito theory of the transmission of yellow fever. Reprinted in Beauperthuy’s La Obra, Caracas, 1963, pp. 260-70; French translation in Travaux scientifiques de Louis-Daniel Beauperthuy, Bordeaux, 1891, pp. 131-42. Digital facsimile of the 1891 edition from the Wellcome Library at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Venezuela, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, Latin American Medicine
  • 5454.2

Yellow fever, considered in its historical, pathological, etiological, and therapeutical relations: including a sketch of the disease as it has occurred in Philadelphia from 1699 to 1854, with an examination of the connections between it and the fevers known under the same name in other parts of temperate, as well as in tropical, regions. 2 vols.

Philadelphia: Blanchard & Lea, 1855.

The most important 19th century American monograph on yellow fever. La Roche’s work sketched the disease in its appearances from 1699 to 1854 at Philadelphia, which saw some of the worst yellow fever epidemics, and provided an excellent bibliography along with discussion of the pathology, aetiology and therapeutics of the disease. Digital facsimile from the National Library of Medicine, Internet Archive, at this link.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › History of Infectious Disease, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever › History of Yellow Fever, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Pennsylvania
  • 5455

El mosquito hipoteticamente considerado como agente de transmisión de la fiebre amarilla.

Ann. r. Acad. Cienc. méd. Habana, 18, 147-69, Havana, 18811882.

Finlay was the first to suggest that the Aedes aegypti mosquito was the vector of yellow fever. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link. English translation by Rudolph Matas as "The mosquito hypothetically considered as an agent in the transmission of yellow fever poison," New Orleans Medical and Surgical Journal, 9 (1882) 601-616. Digital facsimile of the English translation also from Google Books at this link.

 



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Cuba, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, Latin American Medicine
  • 5456

A note on the interval between infecting and secondary cases of yellow fever from the records of yellow fever at Orwood and Taylor, Mississippi, in 1898.

New Orleans med. surg. J., 52, 617-36, New Orleans, LA, 1900.

Carter's determination of the incubation period yellow fever influenced the direction of Reed’s researches, and was instrumental in the discovery of the mode of transmission of the yellow fever virus.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American South, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Mississippi, VIROLOGY
  • 5457

The etiology of yellow fever. A preliminary note.

Philad. med. J., 6, 790-96, 1900.

First definite proof that the organism causing yellow fever is transmitted to man by the mosquito Aëdes aegypti. During the period spent by these workers in the investigation of the disease in Cuba Lazear and Carroll subjected themselves to the bite of infectious mosquitoes to test the theory that mosquitos were carriers of yellow fever. Lazear died from the yellow fever infection in 1900, but Carroll recovered and completed the research. He later died of the yellow fever infection in 1907. Reproduced in part in Major, Classic descriptions of disease, 3rd ed., 1945, p. 131. Further account in J. Hyg. (Camb.), 1902, 2, 101-19.  Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Cuba, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 5459

La fièvre jaune.

Ann. Inst. Pasteur, 17, 665-731, Paris, 1903.

Yellow fever convalescent serum employed. With A. T. Salimbeni and P. L. Simond.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever
  • 5460

Sanitation of the tropics with special reference to malaria and yellow fever.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 52, 1075-77, 1909.

In 1901 Gorgas was sent to Havana to undertake a special campaign against the yellow fever mosquito Aëdes aegypti. His methods of sanitation were so successful that in three months yellow fever was practically eradicated from Havana. Gorgas outlined the main principles of his methods in the above paper.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Cuba, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, Latin American Medicine
  • 5460.1

Fiebre amarilla y fiebre espiroquetal; endemias y epidemias en Muzo, de 1907 a 1910.

Acad. nac. Med. Ses. Cient. Centen., Bogotá, 1, 169-228, Bogota, Colombia, 1911.

Franco, J. Martínez-Santamaria, and G. Toro-Villa described epidemics of yellow fever spread by mosquitoes other than Ae. aegypti. Later F. L. Soper, et al., Amer. J. Hyg., 1933, 18, 555-87, substantiated this.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Colombia, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, Latin American Medicine
  • 5461

A yellow fever vaccine.

Brit. med. J., 1, 976-77, 1928.

First vaccine for immunization against yellow fever. Hindle devised a method for the transportation of frozen infected material from West Africa to London, making it possible to carry on experimental work in Britain.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever
  • 5462

Experimental transmission of yellow-fever to laboratory animals.

Amer. J. trop. Med., 8, 103-64, 1928.

Experimental infection of the monkey, Macacus rhesus, with the yellow fever virus. Stokes succumbed to yellow fever while investigating the disease. With J. H. Bauer and N. P. Hudson.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Yellow Fever Virus
  • 5463

Studies on the action of yellow fever virus in mice.

Ann. trop. Med. Parasit., 24, 249-72, 1930.

The intracerebral protection test in mice, a test for the diagnosis of yellow fever and for the determination of its past existence in a community, was made possible by Theiler’s discovery that white mice are susceptible to the intracerebral inoculation of the virus. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1951.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Yellow Fever Virus
  • 5464

The use of mice in tests of immunity against yellow fever.

J. exp. Med., 54, 533-35, 1931.

Intraperitoneal protection test.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever
  • 5465

Vaccination against yellow fever with immune serum and virus fixed for mice.

J. exp. Med., 55, 945-69, 1932.

These workers devised an immune serum for prophylactic inoculation against yellow fever. With S. F. Kitchen and W. D. M. Lloyd.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Yellow Fever Virus
  • 5465.1

Untersuchungen über das Verhalten des Gelbfiebervirus in der Gewebekultur. Mit besonderer Berücksichtigung seiner Kultivierbarkeit.

Zbl. Bakt., I Abt., Orig., 125, 145-58, 1932.

Yellow fever virus grown in tissue culture.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Yellow Fever Virus
  • 5466

A yellow fever protection test in mice by intracerebral injection.

Ann. trop. Med. Hyg., 27, 57-77, 1933.

Intracerebral protection test.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever
  • 5467

The use of yellow fever virus modified by in vitro cultivation for human immunization.

J. exp. Med., 65, 787-800, 1937.

Immunization without the use of immune serum.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Yellow Fever Virus
  • 5467.1

Yellow fever virus in jungle mosquitoes.

Science, 88, 110-11, 1938.

Haemagogus sp. shown to be vectors of yellow fever. With L. Whitman and M. Frania.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Yellow Fever Virus, ZOOLOGY › Arthropoda › Entomology › Medical Entomology
  • 5468

Yellow fever: an epidemiological and historical study of its place of origin. Edited by Laura Armistead Carter and Wade Hampton Frost.

Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins, 1931.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › History of Infectious Disease, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever › History of Yellow Fever
  • 5469

Korte aantekening wegens eene algemeene ziekte, doorgaans genaamd knokkel-koorts.

Verh. Batav. Genootsch. Kunsten Wet., Batavia, 2, 17-30, 1780.

Bylon described an epidemic of dengue which appeared in the Dutch East Indies in 1779, the first definite description of the disease. O. H. P. Pepper published a photographic reproduction of the article in Ann. med. Hist., 1941, 3rd ser., 3, 363-68. Digital facsimile of the 1780 edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Indonesia, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Dengue Fever, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 5470

An account of the bilious remitting fever. In his Medical inquiries and observations, 1, 104-21

Philadelphia, 1789.

One of the first important accounts of dengue (“breakbone fever”). Rush described the Philadelphia outbreak of 1780.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Dengue Fever, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Pennsylvania
  • 5471

On dengue; its history, pathology, and treatment.

Philadelphia: Haswell, Barrington & Haswell, 1839.


Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Dengue Fever
  • 5472

On the etiology of dengue fever.

Aust. med. Gaz., 25, 17-18, 1906.

Bancroft was the first to produce evidence that Aëdes aegypti is a vector of dengue.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Australia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Dengue Fever
  • 5473

Experimental investigations regarding the aetiology of dengue fever, with a general consideration regarding the disease.

Philipp. J. Sci. B., 2, 93-152, 1907.

Proof that the causal organism of dengue is a filterable virus. Published also in J. infect. Dis., 1907, 4, 440-75.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Dengue Fever, VIROLOGY
  • 5474

On the transmission of Australian dengue by the mosquito Stegomyia fasciata.

Med. J. Aust., 2, 179-84, 200-05, 1916.

These workers proved that Aëdes aegypti (Stegomyia fasciata) is capable of transmitting dengue fever. See also J. Hyg. (Camb.), 1918, 16, 317-418. With C. H. Bradley and W. McDonald.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Australia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Dengue Fever
  • 5475

Experimental studies of dengue.

Philipp. J. Sci., 44, 1-251, 1931.

Proof that Aëdes albopictus is a vector of dengue. See also the earlier paper in the same journal, 1930, 41, 215-29. With J. H. St. John and F. H. K. Reynolds.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Dengue Fever
  • 5475.1

Production of immunity to dengue with virus modified by propagation in mice.

Science, 101, 604-42, 1945.

Successful propagation of dengue in mice and production of a vaccine.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Dengue Fever
  • 5475.2

Bibliography of dengue fever and dengue-like illnesses, 1780-1981.

Nouméa, New Caledonia: South Pacific Commission, 1982.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Diseases, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › South Pacific, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › History of Infectious Disease, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Dengue Fever
  • 5476

Zur Pathologie und Therapie einer eigenthümlichen endemischen Krankheitsform.

Wien. med. Wschr., 36, 1141-45, 1168-71, 1886.

This is generally regarded as the first description of pappataci fever.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Sandfly-Borne Diseases › Phlebotomus (Pappataci) Fever
  • 5477

Ueber ein neues invisibles Virus.

Berl. klin. Wschr., 45, 1847-49., 1908.

Doerr showed the relation of phlebotomus fever to the sandfly, Phlebotomus.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Sandfly-Borne Diseases › Phlebotomus (Pappataci) Fever, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Phenuviridae, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Phenuviridae › Phlebovirus
  • 5478

Weitere Untersuchungen über das Pappatacifieber.

Arch. Schiffs- u. Tropenhyg., 13, 693-706., 1909.

Doerr and Russ suggested that the virus of phlebotomus fever may be transmitted from one generation of infected Phlebotomus papatasii to another.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Sandfly-Borne Diseases › Phlebotomus (Pappataci) Fever, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Phenuviridae › Phlebovirus
  • 5479

Das Pappatacifieber.

Leipzig & Vienna: Franz Deuticke, 1909.

An Austrian military commission consisting of R. Doerr, K. Franz, and S. Taussig proved that the causal organism of pappataci fever was a virus and that Phlebotomus papatasii was the vector.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Sandfly-Borne Diseases › Phlebotomus (Pappataci) Fever, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Phenuviridae › Phlebovirus
  • 5480

Cultivation of the viruses of sandfly fever and dengue fever on the chorioallantoic membrane of the chick-embryo.

Indian J. Med. Research, Calcutta, 23, 865-70., 1936.

Cultivation of the virus of phlebotomus fever. With R. S. Rao and C. S. Swaminath.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Sandfly-Borne Diseases › Phlebotomus (Pappataci) Fever, VIROLOGY
  • 5481

Neue Ansichten der Hundswuth, ihrer Ursachen und Folgen, nebst einer sichem ehandlungsart der von tollen Thieren gebissenen Menschen.

Jena: C. E. Gabler, 1804.

Zinke transmitted rabies from a rabid dog to a normal one, and to a rabbit and a hen, by injection of saliva and proved the disease to be infectious. Digital facsimile from wellcomecollection.org at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rabies, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5481.1

Die Geschichte der Hundswuth und der Wasserscheu und deren Behandlung.

Gotha: In der Hennings’schen Buchbandlung, 1826.

A full account of rabies, summarizing current knowledge, with a bibliography of about 300 items.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Subjects, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rabies, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5481.2

Études sur la rage.

Ann. Méd. vét., 28, 627-39., 1879.

Galtier demonstrated the transmissibility of rabies from dog to rabbit to rabbit in a series, a matter of considerable interest to Pasteur.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rabies, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5481.3

Les injections de virus rabique dans le torrent circulatoire ne provoquent pas l’éclosion de la rage et semblant conférer l’immunité. La rage peut être transmise par l’ingestion de la matiére rabique.

C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris), 93, 284-85, 1881.

Galtier immunized sheep by inoculating rabid saliva in the veins; this did not produce the disease and protected the animals from a further inoculation. His work aroused the interest of Pasteur.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rabies, VETERINARY MEDICINE, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Rhabdoviridae, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Rhabdoviridae › Rabies Lyssavirus
  • 5481.4

Sur la rage.

C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris), 92, 1259-60, 1881.

This paper marks the beginning of Pasteur’s studies on rabies. English translation in R. Suzor, Hydrophobia: An account of M. Pasteur’s system…London, 1887.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rabies, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Rhabdoviridae › Rabies Lyssavirus
  • 5482

Nouvelle communication sur la rage.

C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris), 98, 457-63, 1229-31, 1884.

Demonstration in the blood of the rabies virus. English translation in R. Suzor, Hydrophobia: An account of M. Pasteur’s system…London, 1887.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rabies, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Rhabdoviridae › Rabies Lyssavirus
  • 2541
  • 5483

Méthode pour prévenir la rage après morsure.

C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris), 101, 765-74; 102, 459-69, 835-38; 103, 777-85, 1885, 1886.

Pasteur’s papers describing his rabies vaccine, and the results he attained with it gave further proof of the value of attenuated virus as a protective inoculum against infective diseases in man and animals. This is considered Pasteur’s greatest triumph. A grateful public subscribed two and a half million francs and made possible the erection of the Institut Pasteur, Paris. English translation in R. Suzor, Hydrophobia: An account of M. Pasteur’s system.… London, 1887.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rabies, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Rhabdoviridae › Rabies Lyssavirus
  • 5484

Contributo alio studio dell’ eziologia della rabia.

Boll. Soc. Med.-chir. Pavia, 88, 229; 22; 1905, 321. , 1903, 1904.

Discovery of the “Negri bodies” in rabies, making possible prompt microscopic diagnosis. German translation in Z. Hyg. InfektKr., 1903, 43, 507-28.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rabies
  • 5484.1

Über die Immunisierung gegen Wutkrankheit.

Z. Hyg. InfektKr., 58, 233-76, 1908.

Fermi was the first to use chemical treatment of tissue suspensions of fixed rabies virus for the preparation of vaccine (Fermi vaccine). He introduced the use of carbolic acid for this purpose.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rabies, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Rhabdoviridae › Rabies Lyssavirus
  • 5484.2

Propagation of rabies virus in tissue culture and the successful use of culture virus as antirabic vaccine.

Science, 84, 487-88, 1936.

Webster and Clow succeeded in growing rabies virus in tissue culture.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rabies, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Rhabdoviridae › Rabies Lyssavirus, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 5484.3

Infection of chicks and chick embryos with rabies.

Science, 89, 300-01, 1939.

Cultivation of rabies virus in the chick embryo. Soon afterwards I. J. Kligler and H. Bernkopf, Nature, 1939, 143, 899, made a similar report.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rabies, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Rhabdoviridae › Rabies Lyssavirus
  • 5484.4

Human cell culture rabies vaccine. Antibody response in man.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 224, 1170-71, 1973.

Human diploid cell vaccine. With S. A. Plotkin and D. W. Grella. See also Develop, biol. Standard., 1978, 40, 3-9.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rabies, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Rhabdoviridae › Rabies Lyssavirus
  • 5485

Lektsii ob ostrikh infektsionnîkh bolierznyakh u dietei. [Lectures on acute infectious diseases of children.] 2 vols.

Moscow: A. Lang, 18851887.

Glandular fever (infectious mononucleosis) was first described by Filatov under the name of idiopathic adenitis (“Filatov’s disease”). A German translation of his book appeared in 1895-97.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Russia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Infectious Mononucleosis
  • 5486

Drüsenfieber.

Jb. Kinderheilk., 29, 257-64., 1889.

“Pfeiffer’s disease”. He is by some accredited with the original description of infectious mononucleosis, ascribed to Filatov. Pfeiffer’s paper is a most comprehensive discussion of the clinical aspects of the disease.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Infectious Mononucleosis, VIROLOGY
  • 5486.1

Mononucleosis leukocytosis in reaction to acute infections (“infectious mononucleosis”).

Bull. Johns Hopk. Hosp., 31, 410-17, 1920.

Classic account, with first use of the term “infectious mononucleosis”.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Infectious Mononucleosis
  • 5487

The presence of heterophile antibodies in infectious mononucleosis.

Amer. J. med. Sci., 183, 90-104, 1932.

The Paul–Bunnell test for the diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Infectious Mononucleosis
  • 5487.1

Relation of Burkitt’s tumor-associated herpes-type virus to infectious mononucleosis.

Proc. nat. Acad. Sci. (Wash.), 59, 94-101, 1968.

The Henles and Diehl showed that Epstein-Barr virus is the aetiological agent in infectious mononucleosis. 



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Infectious Mononucleosis, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Herpesviridae › Epstein-Barr Virus, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 5488

Tableau historique et raisonné des épidémies catharrales vulgairement dites la grippe; depuis 1510 jusques et y compris celle de 1780.

Paris: Didot, 1780.


Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › History of Infectious Disease, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza
  • 5489

Annals of influenza or epidemic catarrhal fever in Great Britain from 1510-1837.

London: Sydenham Society, 1852.


Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza
  • 5490

Vorläufige Mittheilungen über die Erregerder Influenza.

Dtsch. med. Wschr., 18, 28, 1892.

Pfeiffer discovered a bacillus, Haemophilus influenzae, “Pfeiffer’s bacillus”, which he believed to be the causal organism of influenza.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Haemophilus, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza
  • 5491

Influenza und Dengue.

Vienna: A. Hölder, 1896.

Forms Bd. IV, Teil 1 of Nothnagel’s Specielle Pathologie und Therapie.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza
  • 5492

Report on the pandemic of influenza 1918-19.

London: H. M. Stationery Office, 1920.

Reports on Public Health and Medical Subjects, No. 4. The most widespread and serious pandemic of influenza occurred in 1918-19. It spread throughout Europe, Russia, Canada, S. America, New Zealand, Australia, Africa, India, China, and Japan. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

"The 1918 influenza pandemic was the most severe pandemic in recent history. It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin. Although there is not universal consensus regarding where the virus originated, it spread worldwide during 1918-1919.  In the United States, it was first identified in military personnel in spring 1918. It is estimated that about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population became infected with this virus. The number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States" (https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-resources/1918-pandemic-h1n1.html, accessed 3-2020).

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › Pandemics › Influenza › 1918 Pandemic (H1N1 virus), Global Health, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Orthomyxoviridae › Influenza A Virus › Influenza A virus subtype H1N1
  • 5493

Swine influenza. III. Filtration experiments and etiology.

J. exp. Med., 54, 373-85, 1931.

Isolation in pigs of influenzavirus A or influenza A virus. Full text available from PubMedCentral at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza, VETERINARY MEDICINE, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Orthomyxoviridae, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Orthomyxoviridae › Influenza A Virus
  • 5494

A virus obtained from influenza patients.

Lancet, 2, 66-68, 1933.

Smith,  Andrewes, and Laidlaw first isolated the influenza A virus in humans. They successfully infected ferrets with filtered throat-washings from influenzal patients by intranasal instillation.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Orthomyxoviridae › Influenza A Virus
  • 5495

Influenza. 2 vols.

London: Baillière, Tindall & Cox, 19331934.

Annals of the Pickett Thomson Research Lab., Monograph 16. "In two massive volumes Thomson and Thomson reviewed the literature on influenza up to 1934" (Spink).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza, VIROLOGY
  • 5496

Propagation of the virus of epidemic influenza on the developing egg.

Med. J. Aust., 2, 687-89, 1935.

Cultivation of the influenza virus.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Orthomyxoviridae
  • 5497

Influenza infection of man from the ferret.

Lancet, 2, 121-23, 1936.

First record of successful passage of influenza from animal to man. The ferret had previously been infected with a virus from a case of influenza.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza
  • 5498

A new type of virus from epidemic influenza.

Science, 92, 405-08, 1940.

Recovery of influenza B virus.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Orthomyxoviridae › Influenza B Virus
  • 5499

A virus from cases of influenza-like upper-respiratory infection.

Proc. Soc. exp. Biol. (N.Y.), 45, 162-64, 1940.

Recovery of influenza B virus.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Orthomyxoviridae › Influenza B Virus