An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15426 entries, 13280 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 20, 2021

Browse by Entry Number 9400–9499

99 entries
  • 9400

Aristotle's De anima with the commentary of Averroes.

Padua: Laurentius Canozius, de Lendenaria, for Johannes Philippus Aurelianus et Fratres, 1472.

"Each paragraph of the text of Aristotle is printed in a new and an old translation, and is followed by the commentary of Averroes on the latter (BMC)" (ISTC No. IDia00969000).

Because of the supreme position of Aristotle in the medieval scientific and philosophical curriculum certain Aristotelian texts were among the first scientific texts to be published in print.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, PSYCHOLOGY
  • 9401

Success and suppression: Arabic sciences and philosophy in the Renaissance.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2016.

A bibliographically oriented historical analysis of the numerous Renaissance translations of Arabic medical, scientific and philosophical works into Latin from the Arabic, which the author argues reached a peak in the 16th century, only later to decline in influence.



Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE › History of Islamic or Arab Medicine, Renaissance Medicine › History of Renaissance Medicine
  • 9402

Osteopathy: Research and practice.

Kirksville, MO: Published by the Author, 1910.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Osteopathy
  • 9403

Philosophy of osteopathy.

Kirksville, MO: Published by A. T. Still, 1899.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Osteopathy
  • 9404

The philosophy and mechanical principles of osteopathy.

Kansas City, MO: Hudson-Kimberly, 1902.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Osteopathy
  • 9405

The history of American homeopathy: From rational medicine to holistic health care.

Rutherford, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2013.


Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Homeopathy › History of Homeopathy, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States
  • 9406

The history of American homeopathy: The academic years, 1820-1935.

Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2005.


Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Homeopathy › History of Homeopathy, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States
  • 9407

Kindly medicine: Physio-medicalism in America, 1836-1911.

Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1997.

"Between 1836 and 1911, thirteen physio-medical colleges opened, and then closed, their doors. These authentic American schools, founded on a philosophy of so-called Physio-Medicalism, substituted botanical medicines for allopathy's mineral drugs and promoted the belief that the human body has an inherent "vital force" that can be used to heal. In Kindly Medicine, John Haller offers the first complete history of this high-brow branch of botanical medicine. Physio-Medicalist, along with Thomsonians, Homeopathys, Hydropaths, and Eclectics, represented the earliest wave of medical sectarianism in nineteenth-century America. United in their opposition to the harsh regimens of allopathy, or regular medicine, these sects had their beginnings in the era of Jacksonian democracy and individualism when every man yearned to become his own legislator, minister, and even his own physician. The Physio-Medicals demanded equal rights with regular practitioners to jobs in the army, navy and public institutions and equal representation on the new state licensing and regulatory boards. As the nineteenth century drew to a close, they saw their influence waning as they could no longer match allopathy's increasing hold on science and on the public's trust" (publisher).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession
  • 9408

The people's doctors: Samuel Thomson and the American Botanical Movement 1790-1860.

Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 2001.

"Samuel Thomson, born in New Hampshire in 1769 to an illiterate farming family, had no formal education, but he learned the elements of botanical medicine from a "root doctor," who he met in his youth. Thomson sought to release patients from the harsh bleeding or purging regimens of regular physicians by offering inexpensive and gentle medicines from their own fields and gardens. He melded his followers into a militant corps of dedicated believers, using them to successfully lobby state legislatures to pass medical acts favorable to their cause.

 "John S. Haller Jr. points out that Thomson began his studies by ministering to his own family. He started his professional career as an itinerant healer traveling a circuit among the small towns and villages of Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts. Eventually, he transformed his medical practice into a successful business enterprise with agents selling several hundred thousand rights or franchises to his system. His popular New Guide to Health (1822) went through thirteen editions, including one in German, and countless thousands were reprinted without permission.

"Told here for the first time, Haller's history of Thomsonism recounts the division within this American medical sect in the last century. While many Thomsonians displayed a powerful, vested interest in anti-intellectualism, a growing number found respectability through the establishment of medical colleges and a certified profession of botanical doctors." (publisher)

 



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northeast, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines › History of Materia Medica, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine
  • 9409

Medical protestants: The Eclectics in American medicine, 1825-1939.

Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1994.

The first modern history of the Eclectic school of American sectarian medicine.

"The Eclectic school (sometimes called the "American School") flourished in the mid-nineteenth century when the art and science of medicine was undergoing a profound crisis of faith. At the heart of the crisis was a disillusionment with the traditional therapeutics of the day and an intense questioning of the principles and philosophy upon which medicine had been built. Many American physicians and their patients felt that medicine had lost the ability to cure. The Eclectics surmounted the crisis by forging a therapeutics based on herbal remedies and an empirical approach to disease, a system independent of the influence of European practices.

"Although rejected by the Regulars (adherents of mainstream medicine), the Eclectics imitated their magisterial manner, establishing two dozen colleges and more than sixty-five journals to proclaim the wisdom of their theory. Central to the story of Eclecticism is that of the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, the "mother institute" of reform medical colleges. Organized in 1845, the school was to exist for ninety-four years before closing in 1939.

"Throughout much of their history, the Eclectic medical schools provided an avenue into the medical profession for men and women who lacked the financial and educational opportunities the Regular schools required, siding with Professor Martyn Paine of the Medical Department of New York University, who, in 1846, had accused the newly formed American Medical Association of playing aristocratic politics behind a masquerade of curriculum reform. Eventually, though, they grudgingly followed the lead of the Regulars by changing their curriculum and tightening admission standards" (publisher)

 



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession
  • 9410

Farmcarts to Fords: A history of the military ambulance, 1790-1925.

Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1992.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine
  • 9411

The physician and sexuality in Victorian America.

Urbana-Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1974.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , SEXUALITY / Sexology › History of Sexuality / Sexology
  • 9412

Shadow medicine: The placebo in conventional and alternative therapies.

New York: Columbia University Press, 2014.


Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › History of Alternative Medicine in General, PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE › Placebo / Nocebo
  • 9413

La maîtrise de soi-même par l'autosuggestion consciente.

Paris, 1922.

English translation as Self-mastery through conscious autosuggestion, New York: Markan Publishing Co., 1922. Digital facsimile of the English translation from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: PSYCHOLOGY, PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE › Placebo / Nocebo, PSYCHOTHERAPY › Hypnosis
  • 9414

The nocebo reaction.

Medical World, 95, 203-5., 1961.

Kennedy coined the term nocebo in this paper.



Subjects: PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE › Placebo / Nocebo
  • 9415

Joannis Mesuae Damasceni De re medica libri tres Jacobo Sylvio medico interprete.

Paris: Christian Wechel, 1542.

Dubois, better known as Sylvius, produced a new translation of the complete works of Mesue, which became the standard text, and was reprinted 21 times. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Collected Works: Opera Omnia, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 9416

Historiae Aegypti naturalis qua continentur rerum Aegyptiarum libri quatuor. Opus posthumum nunc primum ex auctoris autographo, diligentissime recognito, editum; atque ex eodem tabellis aeneis XXV illustratum et uberimmo indice auctem. (2 vols.) Vol. 2: Pars secunda, sive, de Plantis Aegypti liber auctus & emendatus. Accedunt tabella aenae LXXVII plantis summo artificio incisis; ut & dissertatio eiusdem de laserpitio, & lotoaegyptia. Cum observationibus & notis Joannis Veslingii, equitis, In Patavino Gymnasio Anatomiae & Pharmaciae professoris primarii. Accedunt Eiusdem Joannis Veslingii paraeneses ad rem herbariam & vindiciae opobalsami cum indicibus necessariis.

Leiden: apud Gerardum Potvliet, 1735.

Posthumously published works of Alpini on the natural history and botany of Egypt, and Vesling on the botany of Egypt. The second volume, on botany by Alpini was edited by Johannes Vesling, with the addition of his own botanical observations. In 1628 Vesling traveled to Egypt and Jerusalem, where he was the personal physician of the Venice consul, and also conducted extensive studies of regional flora (particularly medicinal plants). Later in his career, Vesling succeeded Alpini as director of the botanical garden at the University of Padua. Remarkably this work was not published until around 80 years after Vesling's death.

Digital facsimile of vol. 1 from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link; of the 2nd volume at this link



Subjects: BOTANY, BOTANY › Medical Botany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Egypt, NATURAL HISTORY
  • 9417

Syntagma anatomicum, publicis dissectionibus, in auditorum usum, diligenter aptatum.

Padua: Paul Frambott, 1641.

Vesling provided an early discussion of the human lymphatic system. He was one of the first physicians to describe the brain's circle of Willis. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 17th Century
  • 9418

Atlas of human brain connections.

Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press, 2012.

The authors combined the science of diffusion tensor imaging with the art of tractography: Spectacular color images.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 21st Century, ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy, IMAGING › Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
  • 9419

Medicine in China: A history of pharmaceutics.

Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1986.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › China, Chinese Medicine › History of Chinese Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals
  • 9420

A short history of medicine.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1955.

Revised and expanded edition with a Foreward and Concluding Essay by Charles Rosenberg (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016).



Subjects: History of Medicine: General Works, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 9421

The surgical history of the naval war between Japan & China during 1894-95. Translated from the original Japanese report under the supervision of Baron Y. Saneyoshi by S. Suzuki.

Tokyo: Tokio Printing Co. Ltd., 1900.

Surgical history of the naval aspects of the First Sino-Japanese War. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Japan, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Navy
  • 9422

An epitome of the reports of the medical officers to the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs Office from 1871 to 1882. With chapters on the history of medicine in China: Materia medica: Epidemics: Famine: Ethnology: And chronology in relation to medicine and public health.

London: Baillière, Tindall & Cox, 1884.

Apart from studies of common diseases, public health issues, and epizootics, this work contains a chapter on opium smoking and a chapter on the castration of Chinese eunuchs, of which there were around a thousand working in the Forbidden City. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, Chinese Medicine › History of Chinese Medicine, EPIDEMIOLOGY, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Opium, PUBLIC HEALTH, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 9423

Obras completa. Compiladas por César Rodriguez Expósito. 5 vols.

Havana: Academia de Ciencias de Cuba & Museo Historico de la Ciencias Medicas Carlos J. Finlay, 19651971.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Cuba, Collected Works: Opera Omnia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 9424

African-American medical pioneers.

Rockville, MD: Betz Publishing Company, 1994.


Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY › History of African Americans & Medicine & Biology
  • 9425

The legacy of Harvey Cushing: Profiles of patient care. Edited by Aaron A. Cohen-Gadol and Dennis D. Spencer.

New York: Thieme & Rolling Meadows, IL: American Association of Neurological Surgeons, 2007.

"... features 800 of Cushing's surgical drawings and photographs of patients and tumor specimens. Preserved untouched for sixty years in the Yale University Library, the images provide the earliest catalog of neurological and neuropathological disease and reveal the techniques employed by the founder of modern neurosurgery. The editors have carefully integrated these high-quality photographs and illustrations into a compelling narrative constructed from patients' hospital records and Cushing's meticulous notes at preoperative and postoperative stages of management. Discharge notes, letters from the family of patients, photographs of patients years after surgery, and death reports further humanize each clinical case and speak to Cushing's lasting dedication to his patients" (publisher).



Subjects: ART & Medicine & Biology, NEUROSURGERY
  • 9426

Photographic atlas of Civil War injuries. Photographs of surgical cases and specimens. Otis Historical Archives.

Grand Rapids, MI: Medical Staff Press & Kennesaw, GA: Kennesaw Mountain Press, 1996.


Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE › History of U.S. Civil War Medicine, IMAGING › Photography / Photomicrography
  • 9427

Orthopaedic injuries of the Civil War: An atlas of orthopaedic injuries and treatments during the Civil War.

Grand Rapids, MI: Medical Staff Press, 1996.


Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE › History of U.S. Civil War Medicine, IMAGING › Photography / Photomicrography , ORTHOPEDICS › History of Orthopedics, Fractures
  • 9428

Masters of Bedlam: The transformation of the mad-doctoring trade.

Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1996.


Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works), COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 9429

Bones: Orthopaedic pathologies in Roman Imperial age.

New York & Berlin: Springer, 2015.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, ORTHOPEDICS › Diseases of or Injuries to Bones, Joints & Skeleton, PATHOLOGY › Paleopathology
  • 9430

Mental disorder in earlier Britain: Exploratory studies.

Cardiff, Wales: University of Wales Press, 1975.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England › Anglo-Saxon Medicine, PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 9431

Historical atlas of immunology.

London & New York: Taylor & Francis, 2005.


Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › History of Immunology
  • 9432

An ear to the chest: An illustrated history of the evolution of the stethoscope.

New York & London: Parthenon Publishing, 2002.


Subjects: INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › History of Biomedical Instrumentation, INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › Medical Instruments › Stethoscope
  • 9433

Leonard of Bertapaglia: On nerve injuries and skull fractures. Translated with an introduction and commentary by Jules C. Ladenheim.

Mount Kisco, NY: Futura Publishing, 1989.


Subjects: NEUROLOGY, NEUROSURGERY › Head Injuries
  • 9434

Mind and madness in ancient Greece: The classical roots of modern psychiatry.

Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1978.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece › History of Ancient Medicine in Greece, PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 9435

Medicine, society and faith in the ancient and medieval worlds.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece › History of Ancient Medicine in Greece, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 9436

The medical aspects of mustard gas poisoning.

St. Louis, MO: C. V. Mosby Co., 1919.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I, TOXICOLOGY
  • 9437

Galen's Institutio logica. English translation, introduction and commentary by John Spangler Kieffer.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1964.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 9438

Medicina de quadrupedibus: An early English version with introduction, translation, notes, and glossary.

Heidelberg: Carl Winter's Universitätsbuchandlung, 1914.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 9439

Chaucer's physician: Medicine and literature in fourteenth-century England.

New Orleans, LA: Tulane Studies in English, 1971.


Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England
  • 9440

Les commentaires de Martin de Saint-Gille sur les aphorisms Ypocras. Edited by Germaine Lafeuille.

Geneva: Librairie Droz, 1964.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › France
  • 9441

The cataract operations of 'Ammar Ibn Alī Al-Mausilī by Max Meyerhof.

Barcelona: Laboratorios del Norte Espagna, 1937.

Mausilī invented a hollow metallic syringe, which he applied through the sclerotic, and successfully extracted cataracts through suction.



Subjects: INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › Medical Instruments › Syringe, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, OPHTHALMOLOGY › History of Ophthalmology, OPHTHALMOLOGY › Ocular Surgery & Procedures › Cataract
  • 9442

Lo "Speculum hominis": Poema anonimo di etimologia medica del secolo XIII. Edited by Marco T. Malato and Concezio Alicandri-Ciufelli.

Rome: Istituto di storia della medicina dell'Università di Roma, 1960.


Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy
  • 9443

Heredity with reference to carcinoma: As shown by the study of the cases examined in the pathological laboratory of the University of Michigan, 1895-1913.

Arch. Int. Med., 12, 546–555 , 1913.

"In 1895, a young seamstress of his [Warthin's] acquaintance told him about her family's long history of cancer deaths.[6] Intrigued, he researched her family's history, searching death records and administering questionnaires, and found multiple cases of cancer. He followed the family, which he called "family G", for decades, and in 1913 he published their history in the Archives of Internal Medicine.[7][8] His article was one of the first to make the case that cancer was heritable in humans, and the medical pedigree of family G (which was later determined to suffer from hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or Lynch Syndrome) is one of the longest and most detailed cancer genealogies in the world" (Wikipedia article on Alfred Scott Warthin, accessed 06-2017).



Subjects: GENETICS / HEREDITY › HEREDITARY / CONGENITAL DISEASES OR DISORDERS › Hereditary Cancers, ONCOLOGY & CANCER, ONCOLOGY & CANCER › Carcinoma
  • 9444

The Russo-Japanese war: Medical and sanitary reports from officers attached to the Japanese and Russian forces in the field, General staff, War office, April 1908.

London: H. M. Stationery Office, 1909.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Japan, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Russia, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE
  • 9445

The Medical Services: Official history of the Canadian forces in the Great War: 1914-1919.

Ottawa: Department of National Defence, 1925.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I
  • 9446

Official history of the Canadian Medical Services: 1939-1945. Vol. 1: Organization and campaigns. Vol. 2: Clinical subjects. Edited by W. R. Feasby. 2 vols.

Ottawa: Edmond Cloutier, 19531956.

Digital facsimiles from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I
  • 9447

Dictionary of Medical Biography. Edited by W. F. Bynum and Helen Bynum. 5 vols.

Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2007.


Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works)
  • 9448

Companion encyclopedia of the history of medicine. Edited by W. F. Bynum and Roy Porter. 2 vols.

London & New York: Routledge, 1993.


Subjects: Encyclopedias, History of Medicine: General Works
  • 9449

The physician of the Dance of Death: A historical study of the evolution of the dance of death mythus in art.

New York: Paul B. Hoeber, 1931.

"Reprinted with additions and corrections from Annals of medical history (n. s., vol. II, nos. 4, 5, 6, 1930, and vol. III, nos. 1, 2, 1931)."



Subjects: ART & Medicine & Biology
  • 9450

Praktische waarnemingen over eenige Javaansche geneesmiddelen, welke niet alleen vele uitheemsche medicamenten, die thans nog van Europa naar Java moeten worden overgezonden, kunnen vervangen, maar dezelve ook tegen eenige ziekten op het eiland Java heerschende, in werkzaamheid overtreffen.

Amsterdam: C.G. Sulpke, 1829.

An early account of Jamu (old spelling Djamu), the traditional medicine of Indonesia, especially Java. "It is a predominantly herbal medicine made from natural materials, such as parts of plants such as roots, bark, flowers, seeds, leaves and fruits.[1] Materials acquired from animals, such as honey, royal jelly, milk and ayam kampung eggs are also often used" (Wikipedia article on Jamu, accessed 06-2017). Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.  Also published in German as Practische Beobachtungen iffier einige Javanische Arzneimittel (Leipzig, 1829).

 

 



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Indonesia, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Traditional Herbal Compounds, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine
  • 9451

Jamu: The ancient Indonesian art of herbal healing.

Hong Kong: Periplus, 2001.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Indonesia, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 9452

The history of tropical neurology: Nutritional disorders.

Science History Publications, 2003.


Subjects: NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology, NUTRITION / DIET › History of Nutrition / Diet, TROPICAL Medicine › History of Tropical Medicine
  • 9453

Drugs and theater in early modern England.

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005.


Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 9454

Birthing bodies in early modern France: Stories of gender and reproduction.

London & New York: Routledge, 2016.


Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › History of Obstetrics
  • 9455

Paolo Zacchia: alle origini della medicina legale, 1584-1659. Edited by Alessandro Pastore and Giovanni Rossi.

Milan: Franco Angeli, 2008.


Subjects: Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine), Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine) › History of Forensic Medicine
  • 9456

An introduction to the medical history of Ethiopia.

Trenton, NJ: Red Sea Press, 1991.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Ethiopia
  • 9457

Encyclopaedia of the history of science, technology, and medicine in non-Western cultures. Edited by Helaine Selin.

Dordrecht: Springer-Science + Business Media, 1997.

Second edition, significantly revised and expanded, 2016.



Subjects: Encyclopedias, Global Health
  • 9458

Atlas of epidemic Britain: A twentieth century picture.

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.


Subjects: Cartography, Medical & Biological, EPIDEMIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology
  • 9459

The introduction of numerical methods to assess the effects of medical interventions during the 18th century: a brief history.

JLL Bulletin: Commentaries on the history of treatment evaluation., 2010.

An outstanding bibliographical survey available online from the James Lind Library at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Online Access Catalogues & Bibliographic Databases, COMPUTING/MATHEMATICS in Medicine & Biology › History of Computing / Mathematics in Medicine & Biology, DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics › History of Demography, DIGITAL RESOURCES › Digital Archives & Libraries
  • 9460

The state of physick, ancient and modern, briefly considered: with a plan for the improvement of it.

London: W. Bowyer for John Nourse, 1732.

Instead of assessing the efficacy of therapies by their correlation with theories, Clifton argued that physicians should base their judgments about the effects of treatments on a sufficient number of their own observations, or observations by other physicians that they trusted. This data he organized in tables. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COMPUTING/MATHEMATICS in Medicine & Biology, DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics, Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design
  • 9461

Tabular observations recommended as the plainest and surest way of practising and improving physick. In a letter to a friend.

London: J. Brindley, 1731.

Clifton argued that physicians should base their judgments about the effects of treatments on a sufficient number of their own observations, or trusted observations by other physicians, rather than on the correlation of treatments with established theory. He recommended that the clinical data should be organized in tables.  Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COMPUTING/MATHEMATICS in Medicine & Biology, DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics, Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design
  • 9462

Bad medicine: Doctors doing harm since Hippocrates.

Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

The paperback edition published in 2007 included a new epilogue by the author in response to critics of the controversial hardback edition.



Subjects: Ethics, Biomedical › History of Biomedical Ethics, History of Medicine: General Works, Quackery
  • 9463

The powerful placebo: From ancient priest to modern physician.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997.


Subjects: History of Medicine: General Works, PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE › Placebo / Nocebo
  • 9464

The therapeutic perspective: Medical practice, knowledge, and identity in America, 1820-1885.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1986.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , THERAPEUTICS › History of Therapeutics
  • 9465

Diabetes, its medical and cultural history: Outlines — texts — bibliography. Edited by Dietrich von Engelhardt.

Berlin & Heidelberg: Springer, 1989.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Diseases, Metabolism & Metabolic Disorders › Diabetes › History of Diabetes
  • 9466

Observations on the diseases which appeared in the army on St. Lucia....To which are prefixed remarks calculated to assist in ascertaining the causes, and in explaining the treatment of those diseases.

Barbados: Printed for the author, 1780.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link. Revised and expanded edition, 1781; digital facsimile of the 1781 edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Caribbean, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 9467

Observations on the management of the prevailing diseases particularly in the Army and Navy; together with a review of that in other countries, and arithmetical calculations of the comparative success of different methods of cure.

London: Printed for the author, 1779.

Millar promoted mathematical methods for computing the comparative success of different methods of cure. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COMPUTING/MATHEMATICS in Medicine & Biology, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Navy
  • 9468

Drugs on trial: Experimental pharmacology and therapeutic innovation in the eighteenth century.

Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1999.

 "This book demonstrates that the basic methodology of the field, including chemical analysis, in vitro testing, animal experimentation and human research, was already developed in the course of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Putting remedies on trial was stimulated by the challenge to Galenism through new chemical, mechanical and vitalist concepts of disease, by the import of exotic drugs and the flourishing trade with secret medicines. The book describes the main issues of eighteenth-century pharmacology and therapeutics and provides detailed case studies of three key areas: lithontriptics (remedies against urinary stones), opium, and Peruvian bark (quinine). It shows how pharmacological knowledge and therapeutic change were promoted in medical centres of the time, such as Edinburgh, London, Paris, Halle and Göttinge" (publisher). 



Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design, PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals, THERAPEUTICS › History of Therapeutics
  • 9469

Outcasts from evolution: Scientific attitudes of racial inferiority, 1859 - 1900.

Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1971.


Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › History of Anthropology, EVOLUTION › History of Evolutionary Thought
  • 9470

Accidents et maladies: Premier soins a donner avant l'arrivée du médecin.

Paris: Victor Masson et Fils, 1868.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Emergency Medicine, Household or Self-Help Medicine
  • 9471

Nouvelles découvertes sur le cœur, expliquées dans une lettre écrite à Monsieur Boudin ....

Paris: Laurent d'Houry, 1706.

The first description of “Vieussen’s valve,” “Vieussens’s ring,” and the “Thebesian veins” of the heart. "These ‘ducti carnosi’ were ultimately named ‘Thebesian veins’ after subsequent work completed by Adam Christian Thebesius just two years after Vieussens’s publication. Vieussens's 1706 work also included a description of the valve of the coronary vein known now as Vieussens’s valve—of clinical significance during placement of biventricular pacing leads—as well as a description of a conus branch of the right coronary artery circling around the aorta to the left arterial system providing a source of collateral flow known as Vieussens’s ring” (Jeremy Parker). 



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY
  • 9472

Comments on corpulency, lineaments of leanness ....

London: John Ebers, 1829.

The first illustrated book on obesity research or medical efforts to control overweight. Wadd, one of the surgeons extraordinary to George IV, drew and engraved the illustrations himself. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Obesity Research
  • 9473

De l'espèce et de la classification en zoologie. Traduction de l'anglais par Félix Vogeli. Édition revue et agumentée par l'auteur.

Paris: Germer Baillière, 1869.

While Agassiz often wrote in general terms regarding his virulent opposition to Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection, he provided his scientific rationale for that opposition only in an appendix to the French translation of his Essay on classification: Part 3, Chapter 7: Le Darwinisme. - Classification de Haeckel. Digital facsimile from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link. See Morris, P.J., "Louis Agassiz's additions to the French translation of his Essay on Classification," Journal of the History of Biology, 30 (1997) 121-134 . Morris's English translation is available from athro.com at this link.

 



Subjects: EVOLUTION, ZOOLOGY › Classification of Animals
  • 9474

2,400 years of malacology, 14th edition.

Murrysville, PA: American Malacological Society, 2017.

A vast online historical bibliography: 1,443 pp. + 110 pp. [Annex 1 – Book Collations] + 65 pp. [Annex 2 – Küster
Collation], 51 pp. [Annex 3 – Journal Collations]. Available at http://www.malacological.org/downloads/epubs/2400-years/2400yrs_of_Malacology_complete.pdf

 



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Online Access Catalogues & Bibliographic Databases, ZOOLOGY › History of Zoology, ZOOLOGY › Malacology
  • 9475

The ethno-botany of the Coahuilla Indians.

Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1900.

"The ʔívil̃uqaletem (or Ivilyuqaletem) are Native Americans of the inland areas of southern California.[2] Their original territory included an area of about 2,400 square miles (6,200 km2). The traditional Cahuilla territory was near the geographic center of Southern California. It was bounded to the north by the San Bernardino Mountains,[2] to the south by Borrego Springs and the Chocolate Mountains, to the east by the Colorado Desert, and to the west by the San Jacinto Plain and the eastern slopes of the Palomar Mountains[3]"  (Wikipedia article on the Cahuilla, accessed 07-2017).



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY, BOTANY › Ethnobotany, NATIVE AMERICANS & Medicine, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › California
  • 9476

The medieval Islamic hospital: Medicine, religion, charity.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2015.

Focuses on Egyptian and Levantine institutions of the twelfth to fourteenth centuries.



Subjects: HOSPITALS › History of Hospitals, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 9477

Die Prognose der Dementia praecox (Schizophreniegruppe).

Allg. Zschr. Psychiat., 65, 436-464, Berlin, 1908.

At the annual meeting of the Deutschen Verein für Psychiatrie in Berlin on the 24th and 25th of April, 1908 Bleuler introduced the term schizophrenia, by which he denoted a group of psychotic reactions rather than one formal disease.



Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › Schizophrenia
  • 9478

Needles, herbs, gods and ghosts: China, healing and the west to 1848.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2005.


Subjects: Chinese Medicine › History of Chinese Medicine
  • 9479

Childbirth, maternity, and medical pluralism in French Colonial Vietnam, 1880-1945.

Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press, 2016.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Vietnam, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › History of Obstetrics
  • 9481

A biographical sketch of an infant.

Mind, 2, 285-294, 1877.

The first significant paper on child psychology, written from Darwin's personal notes of his observations of the development of his first born son, William Erasmus. The text is available from Darwin Online at this link.



Subjects: PSYCHOLOGY › Child
  • 9482

La bataille de cent ans: Histoire de la psychanalyse en France, 1, 1885-1939. 2, 1925-1985. 2 vols.

Paris: Fayard, 1994.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis
  • 9483

A preliminary report on the use of fast neutrons in the treatment of malignant disease.

Radiology, 35, 322-27, 1940.

First report on the introduction of neutron therapy for cancer. See Hans Svensson & Torsten Landberg, "Neutron therapy--the historical background," Acta Oncologica, 33:3 (1984) 227-231. In 1938 Stone began clinical trials treating cancer with neutrons produced by E. O. Lawrence's cyclotron at the University of California, Berkeley. These trials were terminated because the cyclotron was needed for the war effort during World War II.



Subjects: Radiation Oncology
  • 9484

American entomology, or descriptions of the insects of North America. Illustrated by coloured figures from original drawings executed from nature. 3 vols.

Philadelphia: Samuel Augustus Mitchell, 18241828.

Plates by Titian Ramsay Peale, H. Bridport, C. A. Lesueur, W. W. Wood, and C. Tiebout; engraved by Tiebout, G. Lang, and Longacre. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , NATURAL HISTORY › Illustration, ZOOLOGY › Arthropoda › Entomology
  • 9485

American conchology, or descriptions of the shells of North America illustrated from coloured figures from original drawings executed from nature. 7 parts. Parts 1–6: New Harmony, 1830–1834; Part 7: Philadelphia, 1836.

New Harmony, IN & Philadelphia: Printed at the School Press, 18301836.

The printer or publisher of part 7 is not identified. Digital facsimile from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , NATURAL HISTORY › Illustration, ZOOLOGY › Malacology
  • 9486

A model of inexact reasoning in medicine.

Mathematical Biosciences, 23, 351-379., 1975.

"MYCIN was an early backward chaining expert system that used artificial intelligence to identify bacteria causing severe infections, such as bacteremia and meningitis, and to recommend antibiotics, with the dosage adjusted for patient's body weight — the name derived from the antibiotics themselves, as many antibiotics have the suffix "-mycin". The Mycin system was also used for the diagnosis of blood clotting diseases. MYCIN was developed over five or six years in the early 1970s at Stanford University. It was written in Lisp as the doctoral dissertation of Edward Shortliffe under the direction of Bruce G. BuchananStanley N. Cohen and others. It arose in the laboratory that had created the earlier Dendral expert system.

"MYCIN was never actually used in practice but research indicated that it proposed an acceptable therapy in about 69% of cases, which was better than the performance of infectious disease experts who were judged using the same criteria" (Wikipedia article on MYCIN, accessed 08-2017). See also, Shortliffe, Computer-based medical consultations: MYCIN. New York: Elsevier, 1976, and Buchanan & Shortliffe, Rule based expert systems: The Mycin experiments of the Stanford Heuristic Programming Project. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1984. Digital facsimile of this 1984 work from aitopics.org at this link.

 

 



Subjects: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine , COMPUTING/MATHEMATICS in Medicine & Biology
  • 9487

"A computer-based system for the study and control of drug interactions in hospitalized patients," P. L. Morselli, S. Garattini, and S. N. Cohen, Drug interactions, 363-373.

New York: Raven Press, 1974.

MEDIPHOR System (Monitoring and Evaluation of Drug Interactions by a Pharmacy-Oriented Reporting System) developed by Cohen, Shortliffe and colleagues at Stanford University Medical School, published as a chapter in the book, Drug interactions (1974). With 12 co-authors.



Subjects: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine , COMPUTING/MATHEMATICS in Medicine & Biology, PHARMACOLOGY
  • 9488

Speaking of epidemics in Chinese medicine: Disease and the geographic imagination in late imperial China.

New York: Routledge, 2011.


Subjects: Chinese Medicine › History of Chinese Medicine, EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology
  • 9489

"Hand mnemonics in classical Chinese medicine: Texts, earliest images, and arts of memory," Festschrift issued in honor of Nathan Sivin, Asia Major series 3, 21.1, 325-357.

2008.


Subjects: Chinese Medicine › History of Chinese Medicine, NEUROSCIENCE › Neuropsychology › Memory
  • 9490

Iseki kō. (I Chi Kao). 8 vols.

Tokyo, 1831.

A comprehensive annotated bibliography in Japanese of Chinese medical literature, including materia medica. The bibliography includes works for which the author had references, but could not locate copies. According to Lu & Needham, Taki's work was finished c. 1825, first printed in 1831, reprinted in Tokyo in 1933-35, and reprinted in Shanghai, 1936. There was also a reprint in Beijing in 1956. Limited (search only) access  to the 1933-35 reprint from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY , Chinese Medicine , Chinese Medicine › History of Chinese Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 9491

Anatomia 1522-1867. Anatomical plates from the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library.

Toronto, Canada: Thomas Fisher Rare Book Room, University of Toronto Library , 2003.

https://resource.library.utoronto.ca/anatomia/application/index.cfm

"This collection features approximately 4500 full page plates and other significant illustrations of human anatomy selected from the Jason A. Hannah and Academy of Medicine collections in the history of medicine at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto. Each illustration has been fully indexed using medical subject headings (MeSH), and techniques of illustration, artists, and engravers have been identified whenever possible. There are ninety-five individual titles represented, ranging in date from 1522 to 1867"



Subjects: ANATOMY › Anatomical Illustration, DIGITAL RESOURCES › Digital Archives & Libraries
  • 9492

Reliquiae Aquitanicae; being contributions to the archaeology and palaeontology of Périgord and the adjoining provinces of southern France. Edited by Thomas Rupert Jones.

London: Williams & Norgate & Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1875.

This beautiful and bibliographically complicated work was issued in 17 parts from 1865 to 1875. It includes 82 tinted lithographic plates, and is the first visually spectacular large extensively illustrated publication on paleoanthropology and paleolithic mobiliary art. Plate B-XXVIII illustrates the ivory carving of a mammoth discovered in 1864 by Lartet, Falconer, and de Verneuil in the cave of La Madeleine, which provided undeniable evidence that humans and mammoths had co-existed. Lartet first described this carving in a paper entitled “Une lame d’ivoire fossile trouvée dans un gisement ossifere du Périgord, et portant des incisions qui paraissent constituer la reproduction d’un éléphant à longue crinere,” published in the Comptes rendus des séances de l’Académie des sciences 61 (1865): 309–11; an English translation of this brief paper appears in the Reliquiae Aquitanicae. The work also includes the English translation of the first paper on Cro-Magnon man by Edouard Lartet's son, Louis Lartet: Mémoire sur une sépulture des anciens troglodytes du PérigordAnnales des sciences naturelles, 5e sér., zoologie et paléontologie, 10, 133-1451868.



Subjects: ART & Medicine & Biology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, EVOLUTION, EVOLUTION › Human Origins / Human Evolution
  • 9493

Alternative medicine: A history.

Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press, 2007.


Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › History of Alternative Medicine in General
  • 9494

Send-Brieven, zoo aan de Hoog-edele Heeren van de Koninklyke Societeit te Londen, als aan andere Aansienelyke en Geleerde Lieden....

Delft: Adriaan Beman, 1718.

In his letter of 2 March 1717 (letter XXXII) addressed to Abraham van Bleyswyk and first published in this edition, Leewenhoek provided the first morphologic description of nerve fibers accompanied by illustrations. “One of the most interesting features relating to the letter of 2 March 1717 is the accompanying illustration (fig.2, fig 2) for it is probably the first attempt to represent the cross section of a peripheral nerve. Individual nerve fibers can be seen, and the central stroke contained in each is meant to indicate the collapsed central tube, which he assumed was present; or, as we should put it today, the axis cylinder surrounded by the myelin sheath. It seems likely therefore that Leeuwenhoek observed the myelinated nerve fiber although his interpretation was incorrect; and having discovered no cavities in the nerve itself, he found in the individual fibers the hollowness that the then current theory of nerve function demanded. The thin section of the nerves which he cut was probably the first ever” (Clarke and  O’Malley, The human brain and spinal cord. 2nd. Ed. [1996] 30-35, citing the Latin edition). The following year this edition was translated into Latin in 1719 and issued by the same publisher as Epistolae physiologicae super compluribus naturae arcanis; ubi variorum animalium atque plantarum fabrica, conformatio, proprietates atque operationes, novis & hactenus inobservatis experimentis illustrantur & oculis exhibentur; item peculiaries & hactenus incognitae rerum quarumdam qualitates explicatur: ut sequens pagina docet: hactenus numquam editae (Delft: Adriaan Beman, 1719.) Digital facsimile of the 1718 Dutch edition from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link. Digital facsimile of the 1719 Latin edition from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy, MICROBIOLOGY
  • 9495

Banks' Florilegium: A publication in thirty-four parts [plus 1 supplement] of seven hundred and thirty-eight copperplate engravings of plants collected on Captain James Cook's first voyage around the world in the H.M.S. Endeavour 1768-1771. The specimens were gathered and classified by The Right Hon. Sir Joseph Banks and Dr. Daniel Solander, and were accurately engraved between 1771 and 1784 after drawings taken from nature by Sydney Parkinson. 35 large folio solander boxes & 1 vol. text.

London: Alecto Historical Editions & The British Museum (Natural History), 19801990.

Banks' Florilegium has been called the largest fine art printing project of the 20th century. It is the first complete publication in color of the 734 folio size copperplate engravings of newly discovered plants collected by Sir Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander  while they accompanied Captain James Cook on his voyage around the world between 1768 and 1771. Banks and Solander collected plants in Madeira, Brazil, Tierra del Fuego, the Society Islands, New Zealand, Australia and Java. 

Banks' and Solander's specimens were studied aboard the HMS Endeavour by the artist Sydney Parkinson. Parkinson drew each specimen and made notes on their color, and for some species completed watercolor illustrations. When the Endeavour returned to London Banks hired artists Frederick Polydore Nodder, John Frederick Miller, James Miller, John Cleverly and Thomas Burgis to create watercolors of all of Parkinson's drawings. Between 1771 and 1784 Banks hired 18 engravers to create the copperplate engravings from the 743 completed watercolors with the purpose of eventually publishing an edition. Because Banks was engaged in many other projects, the Florilegium was not printed in Banks' lifetime, and he bequeathed the plates to the British Museum, where they were preserved. Between 1900 and 1905 James Britten and the British Museum issued prints of 315 of the plant engravings in black ink, under the title Illustrations of Australian Plants. Others were included in black and white in the 1973 book Captain Cook's Florilegium (Wikipedia). However, the complete series of plates in Banks' Florilegium was never issued in color until the above edition.

Limited to only 100 numbered sets, the sets were issued in 101 cloth-backed portfolios housed in 35 large folio custom-made solander boxes (including Supplement). The complete Banks’ Florilegium contains 738 engraved plates printed in color by hand using a 17th century printing technique called à la poupée, in which each color was applied directly to the copperplate by hand, and some plates were retouched with watercolor afterwards. The technique derives from a method developed by Johannes Tayler in the 17th century and revived by Pierre-Joseph Redouté in the early 19th century. The involved process of inking with a rolled up "dolly" of cotton tarlatan, printing, and cleaning the plates can take upwards of three hours for each impression.

 

 



Subjects: BOTANY, BOTANY › Botanical Illustration, VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 9496

Die Geschichte der Physiologie des Vestibular Apparates seit 1850. IN: Politzer’s Geschichte der Ohrenheilkunde, Vol. 2.

Stuttgart: Ferdinand Enke, 1913.

Translated into English by Dennis G. Pappas, as "Barany's History of vestibular physiology: Translation and commentary," Ann. Otol. Rhin. Larygngol.,1984, 93, no. 2, pt. 3. Supplement 110.



Subjects: OTOLOGY › History of Otology
  • 9497

The poisonous snakes of India: For the use of the officials and others residing in the Indian Empire.

London: J. & A. Churchill, 1878.

Digital facsimile from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, TOXICOLOGY › Venoms, ZOOLOGY › Herpetology
  • 9498

American ornithology; or, the natural history of the birds of the United States: Illustrated with plates engraved and colored from original drawings taken from nature. 9 vols.

Philadelphia: Bradford & Inskeep, 18081814.

Considered the "father of American ornithology," Wilson was the greatest American ornithologist before Audubon. Wilson died with the 7th volume in press, and the 8th and 9th volumes were completed by Wilson's friend George Ord, who included a memoir of Wilson in the final volume. Because of the limitation of Wilson's travels and his early death, the work was incomplete, but it was by far the most extensive work about American birds to date, and the color plates set a new standard for works produced in America, even though Wilson's artistry was sometimes crude, and his depictions of birds were stiff and out of scale. The set has been called "the first truly outstanding American color plate book of any type" (Bennett). Digital facsimile of the complete set from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , NATURAL HISTORY › Illustration, ZOOLOGY › Ornithology
  • 9499

American ornithology; or, the natural history of birds inhabiting the United States, not given by Wilson. 4 vols.

Philadelphia: Carey, Lea & Carey, 18251828.

Bonaparte, nephew of Napoleon, set out to document birds in the United States that were not mentioned by Alexander Wilson.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , ZOOLOGY › Ornithology