An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15423 entries, 13280 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 17, 2021

Browse by Entry Number 8800–8899

100 entries
  • 8800

History, sex and syphilis: Famous syphilitics and their private lives.

Bradenton, FL: BookLocker.com, Inc., 2015.


Subjects: ART & Medicine & Biology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Syphilis › History of Syphilis, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology, Music and Medicine
  • 8801

Biotech: The countercultural foundations of an industry.

Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006.


Subjects: Biotechnology › History of Biotechnology
  • 8802

Public health in British India: Anglo-Indian preventive medicine 1859-1914.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

The first major study of public health in British India.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in › History of Practice of Medicine in India, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health
  • 8803

Notes on the medical topography of Calcutta.

Calcutta: G. H. Huttmann, Bengal Military Orphan Press, 1837.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, Cartography, Medical & Biological, Geography of Disease / Health Geography, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 8804

Miasmas and disease: Public health and the environment in the pre-industrial age. Translated by Elizabeth Potter.

New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1992.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health
  • 8805

The trade in lunacy: A study of private madhouses in England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1972.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 8806

Clinical illustrations of the more important diseases of Bengal, with the result of an inquiry into their pathology and treatment.

Calcutta: Printed at the Baptist Mission Press, 1832.

Digital facsimile from the Medical Heritage Library, Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, Geography of Disease / Health Geography, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in
  • 8807

Practical observations on the principal diseases affecting the health of the European and native soldiers in the north-western provinces of India with a supplement on dysentery.

Calcutta: Wm. Thacker & Co., 1843.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Dysentery, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE
  • 8808

The historical relations of ancient Hindu with Greek medicine in connection with the study of modern medical science in India: Being a general introductory lecture delivered June 1850, at the Calcutta Medical College.

Calcutta: J. C. Sherriff, Military Orphan Press, 1850.

Webb was surgeon in the Bengal Army, and later Professor of Anatomy at the Calcutta Medical College. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece › History of Ancient Medicine in Greece, ANCIENT MEDICINE › India › History of Ancient Medicine in India, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in
  • 8809

Elephantiasis orientalis, and especially elephantiasis genitalis in Bengal.

Calcutta: F. Carbery, Bengal Military Orphan Press, 1855.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Lymphatic Filariasis (Elephantiasis)
  • 8810

Pathologia Indica, or, The anatomy of Indian diseases, medical and surgical: Based upon morbid specimens from all parts of India in the museum of the Calcutta Medical College; illustrated by detailed cases, with the prescriptions and treatment employed, and comments, physiological, practical and historical.

Calcutta: W. H. Carey, 1844.

Significantly expanded second edition, in two parts (Calcutta: Thacker & Co., 1848).  Digital facsimile of the 1848 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in, MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological , PATHOLOGY, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 8811

Colonizing the body: State medicine and epidemic disease in nineteenth-century India.

Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1993.

An authoritative account of the way that medicine was practiced in India in adaptation to the situation faced by physicians and the state in India, focusing on three major epidemic diseases: smallpox, cholera plague.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, Geography of Disease / Health Geography › History of Geography of Disease, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in › History of Practice of Medicine in India, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › History of Smallpox, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health
  • 8812

The work of medical women in India.

London: Oxford University Press, 1929.


Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works), COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 8813

Observations on the diseases in long voyages to hot countries, and particularly on those which prevail in the East Indies.

London: D. Wilson & G. Nicol, 1773.

Digital facsimile of the third edition, "revised and enlarged" (1793) from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › East Indies, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 8814

An account of the diseases of India, as they appeared in the English fleet, and in the naval hospital at Madras, in 1782 and 1783; with observations on ulcers, and the hospital sores of that country, &c. & c. To which is prefixed a view of the diseases of an expedition and passage of a fleet and armament to India, in 1781.

Edinburgh: W. Laing & London: Longman, Hurst..., 1807.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Navy, Maritime Medicine, TROPICAL Medicine , VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 8815

British military and naval medicine, 1600-1830. Edited by Geoffrey L. Hudson.

Leiden: Brill, 2007.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine
  • 8816

Results of an investigation, respecting epidemic and pestilential diseases; including researches in the Levant, concerning the plague. 2 vols.

London: Thomas and George Underwood, 1817.

"From 1815 to 1817 Maclean travelled in Spain, Turkey, and the Levant, and he studied the plague at the Greek Pest Hospital at Constantinople, in the service of the Levant Company. His experiences in the Levant and in India provided the basis for his most important medical work, The Results of an Investigation Respecting Epidemic and Pestilential Diseases (1817). Here Maclean restated his opposition to the theory that epidemic diseases were contagious, adding that the quarantine measures then imposed routinely in most Mediterranean ports against vessels sailing from the Levant had no basis in medical fact" (ODNB).  Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Middle East, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans), VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 8817

Pharmacopoeia of India, prepared under the authority of Her Majesty's Secretary of State for India in Council. By Edward John Waring, assisted by a committee appointed for the purpose. India Office: 1868.

London: W. H. Allen & Co., 1868.

Waring was "Surgeon in Her Majesty's Indian Army." Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in, PHARMACOLOGY › Pharmacopeias
  • 8818

Remarks on the uses of some bazaar medicines, and on a few of the common indigenous plants of India, according to European practice.

Travancore, India: Sirrar Press, 1860.

At the time of publication of this work, which contained texts in both Sanskrit and English, Waring was "Physician to His Highness The Maha Rajah of Travancore." Digital facsimile of the 1860 edition from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.

Expanded fifth edition: Remarks on the uses of some of the bazaar medicines and common medical plants of India: With a full index of diseases, indicating their treatment by these and other agents procurable throughout India: To which are added directions for treatment in cases of drowning, snake-bites, &c. (London, 1897). At this point Waring was "Surgeon-Major (Retired) Her Majesty's Indian Army." Digital facsimile of the 1897 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, Emergency Medicine › Resuscitation, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, TOXICOLOGY › Venoms
  • 8819

A history of the Army Medical Department. 2 vols.

Edinburgh & London: Churchill-Livingstone, 1974.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine
  • 8820

Doctors and slaves: A medical and demographic history of slavery in the British West Indies.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1985.


Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY › History of African Americans & Medicine & Biology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Caribbean, DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics › History of Demography, Slavery and Medicine › History of Slavery & Medicine, TROPICAL Medicine › History of Tropical Medicine
  • 8821

American Negro slavery: A survey of the supply, employment and control of Negro labor as determined by the plantation régime.

New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1918.

Incudes information on health and medicine. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY › History of African Americans & Medicine & Biology, Slavery and Medicine › History of Slavery & Medicine
  • 8822

Medicine in an age of commerce and empire: Britain and its tropical colonies 1660-1830.

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010.


Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, Geography of Disease / Health Geography › History of Geography of Disease, TROPICAL Medicine › History of Tropical Medicine
  • 8823

Avicenna's medicine: A new translation of the 11th-century Canon with practical applications for integrative health care.

Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 2013.

A new translation of volume one of Avicenna's Qānūn (Canon), directly from the original Arabic.



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 8824

Die Augenheilkunde des Ibn Sina aus dem Arabischen Übersetzt und Erläutert.

Leipzig: Verlag von Veit, 1902.

Translation of Book III, Fan III of Avicenna's Canon pertaining to the eye and its diseases. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine, OPHTHALMOLOGY › History of Ophthalmology
  • 8825

Indigenous races of the earth; or new chapters of ethnological enquiry: Including monographs on special departments of philology, iconography, cranioscopy, palaeontology, pathology, archaeology, comparative geography and natural history: Contributed by Alfred Maury, Francis Pulszky, and J. Aiken Meigs. With contributions from Jos. Leiden and L. Agassiz. Presenting fresh investigations by J. C. Nott and Geo. R. Glidden.

Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1857.

Expensively produced, and sold in both standard and large paper subscriber editions, Nott and Gliddon's work was one of the most egregiously racist publications in the history of physical anthropology. Nott, a prominent Southern physician, was a member of Samuel George Morton's American School of Anthropology, which held that that the different races of humankind represented separate species with separate, ancient origins predating the Biblical "creation." Polygenist arguments about race were particularly attractive in the antebellum South, as they provided support for slavery without overtly contradicting the Bible's account of the creation. One of the most outrageous of these arguments (by our standards) was Agassiz's correlation of the geographical distribution of monkeys with that of the "inferior" (i.e., non-white) races of man, an idea further developed by Gliddon in a fold-out chart. This chart, as well as the large folding "Ethnographic Tableau" at the front of the book, are hand-colored in the subscriber's edition; in the regular small-paper edition they are uncolored. Digital facsimile  of a "Subscriber's Copy" from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY › Craniology, ANTHROPOLOGY › Ethnology, ANTHROPOLOGY › Physical Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American South
  • 8826

A history of anthropological theory. 5th edition.

Toronto, Canada: University of Toronto Press, 2016.


Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › History of Anthropology
  • 8827

Types of mankind: or, ethnological researches based upon the ancient monuments, paintings, sculptures and crania of races, and upon their natural, geographical, philological, and biblical history; illustrated by selections from the indedited papers of Samuel George Morton, and by additional contributions by L. Agassiz, W. Usher, and H. S. Patterson. By J. C. Nott and Geo. R. Gliddon.

Philadelphia: Lippincott, Grambo & Co., 1854.

Nott, a prominent physician and anthropologist in Mobile, Alabama, employed polygenist arguments to justify slavery. This required resoilving the problem of racial hybridity. Polygenists claimed that different races were different species. Species, however, were supposed to be incapable of producing fertile offspring, while it was obvious that different races, specifically white and black could reproduce and create mulattoes. To keep the designation of races as 'species' intact, Nott redefined the definition of species, making its essential characteristic not hybrid infertility, but morphological distinctness through time-time longer than could be inferred from the Bible. . . . Nott sought to disassociate anthropology from the Bible. His alternative explanation was that races had been separately created before Biblical time. His medical experience convinced him that blacks and whites possessed different susceptibilities to disease, attributable to innately different 'vitalities.' Nott argued against monogenist anthropologists, who believed that races had a recent and common origin. . . .Nott's comments on race brought him to the attention of other members of the American School, including its proclaimed leader, Samuel George Morton. After Morton's death, George Glidden, then the U.S. consul in Cairo, persuaded Nott to co-author a book, Types of mankind, dedicated to Morton's memory. Gliddon's contribution was to show that blacks and whites had been distinct as early as Egypt's first dynasty. Nott's contribution was also intended to demonstrate the antiquity of racial differences, as well as to show that races were immune to major change. Digital facsimile of the 1854 second edition from the Internet Archive at this link. Sttee Paul A. Erickson, The anthropology of Josiah Clark Nott avaiable from digitalassets.lib.berkeley.edu at this link.



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY › Craniology, ANTHROPOLOGY › Ethnology, ANTHROPOLOGY › Physical Anthropology
  • 8828

Catalogue of skulls of man, and the inferior animals, in the collection of Samuel George Morton.

Philadelphia: Printed by Turner & Fisher, 1840.

Numbers 901-929 in Morton's catalogue are "Thirty Skulls of genuine unmixed NEGROES born in Africa. This interesting series series was collected by Don José Rodriguez Cisnerso, M. D. of Havana, in the island of Cuba, and by him presented to me for the purpose of ascertaining the internal capacity of the cranium in the pure AFRICAN race."

Morton believed that he could define the intellectual ability of a race by the skull capacity. A large volume meant a large brain and high intellectual capacity, and a small skull indicated a small brain and decreased intellectual capacity. He also claimed that each race had a separate origin, and that a descending order of intelligence could be discerned that placed Caucasians at the pinnacle and Negroes at the lowest point, with various other races in between. Considered the origin of scientific racism, this theory provided a "scientific" justification for slavery.

 "Samuel George Morton is often thought of as the originator of "American School" of ethnography, a school of thought in antebellum American science that claimed the difference between humans was one of species rather than variety and is seen by some as the origin of scientific racism.[6]

"Morton argued against the single creation story of the Bible (monogenism) and instead supported a theory of multiple racial creations (polygenism). Morton claimed the Bible supported polygenism, and within working in a biblical framework his theory held that each race had been created separately and each was given specific, irrevocable characteristics.[7]

"After inspecting three mummies from ancient Egyptian catacombs, Morton concluded that Caucasians and Negroes were already distinct three thousand years ago. Since the Bible indicated that Noah's Ark had washed up on Mount Ararat, only a thousand years ago before this, Morton claimed that Noah's sons could not possibly account for every race on earth. According to Morton's theory of polygenesis, races have been separate since the start[7] " (Wikipedia article on Samuel George Morton, accessed 01-2017).

Digital facsimile of the 1840 edition from the Internet Archive at this link. Morton continued to develop and expand his collection, which reached 1512 human and animal skulls in the third edition of his catalogue published in 1849. That catalogue contained an introduction, some illustrations, and a complete index. Digital facsimile of the 1849 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.

Morton's last paper on the measurement of cranial capacity and its relationship to intellectual ability may have been "Observations on the size of brain in various races and families of man," Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences, October, 1849.  Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.

 



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Craniology, ANTHROPOLOGY › Ethnology, ANTHROPOLOGY › Physical Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Africa, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological , Slavery and Medicine, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Pennsylvania
  • 8829

Catalogue of human crania, in the collection of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia: Based upon the third edition of Dr. Morton's "Catalogue of Skulls," &c.

Philadelphia, 1857.

"Since the death of the late lamented President of the Academy of Natural Sciences,- Dr. Samuel George Morton,- his magnifcent Collection of Human Crania, recently increased by the receipt of 67 skulls from various sources, has been permanently deposited in the Museum of the Academy. Prior to his demise, Dr. M. had recieved 100 crania in addition to those mentioned in the third edition of his Catalogue. Since 1849, therefore, the Collection has been augmented by the addition of 167 skulls. To complete the Catalogue in a uniform manner, these have been carefully numbered and measured in accordance with the methods recorded in the Crania Americana, &c....

"The entire Collection,- numbering 1035 crania,- was purchased by forty-two gentlemen from the executors of Dr. Morton, for the sum of $4,000 and by them generously presented to the academy.

"The Collection occupies 16 cases on the first gallery, on the south side of the lower room of the Museum. For convenience of study and examination I have grouped the crania according to Race, Family, Tribe, &c., strictly adhering, however, to the classification of Dr. Morton....(p, 3).

"Extensive and unique as is the Collection, it is, nevertheless, still too limited to justify positive and comprehensive conclusions concerning the great fundamental problems of Ethnology. That it will be capable, when sufficiently extended, of throwing much light upon these obscure and unsettled questions is amply attested by the scientific publications of Dr. Morton. It is earnestly hoped, therefore, that this magnificent nucleus, the result of much pecuniary sacrifice and many years of enthusiastic labor on the part of its late illustrious owner and founder, will not be neglected, but that its efficiency will be increased, and the objects for which it was gathered together attained by contributions from all who may be interested in the advancement of this youngest, most intricate, and most important of the sciences" (p. 11). Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Craniology, ANTHROPOLOGY › Ethnology, ANTHROPOLOGY › Physical Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological , U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Pennsylvania
  • 8830

Wellington's doctors: The British Army Medical Services in the Napoleonic wars.

Stroud, England: Spellmount, 2002.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine
  • 8831

A new world of animals: Early modern Europeans on the creatures of Iberian America.

Aldershot, England: Ashgate, 2005.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Latin America, ZOOLOGY › History of Zoology
  • 8832

Crania Aegyptiaca: or, observations on Egyptian ethnography, derived from anatomy, history and the monuments. From the Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Vol. IX.

Philadelphia: John Pennington & London: Madden & Co., 1844.

Morton argued that blacks and whites had been racially distinct since the Egyptian First Dynasty and drew the following conclusions, long since debunked:

"Conclusions.

"1. The valley of the Nile, both in Egypt and in Nubia, was originally peopled by a branch of the Caucasian race.

"2. These primeval people, since called Egyptians, were the Mizairmites of Scripture, the poster ity of Ham, and directly affiliated with the Libyan family of nations.

"3. In their physical character the Egyptians were intermediate between the indo-European and Semitic races.

..."8. Negroes were numerous in Egypt, but their social position in ancient times was the same as it now is, that of servants and slaves" (pp. 65-66).



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Craniology, ANTHROPOLOGY › Ethnology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Egypt
  • 8833

Flora unveiled: The discovery and denial of sex in plants.

New York & Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017.

"Sex in animals has been known for at least ten thousand years, and this knowledge was put to good use during animal domestication in the Neolithic period. In stark contrast, sex in plants wasn't discovered until the late 17th century, long after the domestication of crop plants. Even after its discovery, the "sexual theory" continued to be hotly debated and lampooned for another 150 years, pitting the "sexualists" against the "asexualists." Why was the notion of sex in plants so contentious for so long? "Flora Unveiled" is a deep history of perceptions about plant gender and sexuality, beginning in the Ice Age and ending in the middle of the nineteenth century, with the elucidation of the complete plant life cycle. 
Linc and Lee Taiz show that a gender bias that plants are unisexual and female (a "one-sex model") prevented the discovery of plant sex and delayed its acceptance long after the theory was definitively proven. The book explores the various sources of this gender bias, beginning with women's role as gatherers, crop domesticators, and the first farmers. In the myths and religions of the Bronze and Iron Ages, female deities were strongly identified with flowers, trees, and agricultural abundance, and during Middle Ages and Renaissance, this tradition was assimilated into Christianity in the person of Mary. The one-sex model of plants continued into the Early Modern Period, and experienced a resurgence during the eighteenth century Enlightenment and again in the nineteenth century Romantic movement. Not until Wilhelm Hofmeister demonstrated the universality of sex in the plant kingdom was the controversy over plant sex finally laid to rest. Although "Flora Unveiled" focuses on the discovery of sex in plants, the history serves as a cautionary tale of how strongly and persistently cultural biases can impede the discovery and delay the acceptance of scientific advances" (publisher)



Subjects: BOTANY › History of Botany
  • 8834

Computers in biomedical research. Edited by Ralph W. Stacy and Bruce Waxman. 2 vols.

New York: Academic Press, 1965.

Section A, Chapter 2: "New mathematical methods in the life sciences" by George B. Dantzig.

Section D, Chapter 12: "The application of computers to electroencephalography" by Mary A. B. Brazier.

Section E, Chapter 13: "Computer techniques in medical diagnosis" by Lee B. Lusted.

Section E, Chapter 14: "Computers in muliphasic screening" by Morris F. Collen, Leonard Rubin, and Louis Davis.

Section F, Chapter 20: "Computer simulation of neurotic processes" by Kenneth Mark Colby.

Vol. 2, Section A, Chapter 2: "A description of the LINC" by W[esley] A. Clark and C[harles] E. Molnar.

Vol. 2, Section B, Chapter 6: "Programs as theories of higher mental processes" by Allen Newell and Herbert A. Simon.



Subjects: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine , COMPUTING/MATHEMATICS in Medicine & Biology, PHYSIOLOGY › Electrophysiology › Electroencephalography
  • 8835

The journal of James Yonge, Plymouth surgeon (1647-1721). Edited by F. N. L. Poynter.

London: Longmans, Green & Co. & Hamden, CT: Archon Books, 1963.

A complete account of Yonge's life from the age of ten until the age of 61. "It is considered to be the most important diary of the 17th century after those of Samuel Pepys and John Evelyn.[1] In it Yonge mentioned famous people he had seen in his travels, dropping names and in some cases giving a frank opinion." (Wikipedia article on James Yonge, accessed 01-2017). Digital facsimile of the 1963 edition from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Autobiography, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), SURGERY: General
  • 8836

Wounds of the brain proved curable, not only by the opinion and experience of many (the best) authors, but the remarkable history of a child four years old cured of two very large depressions, with the loss of a great part of the skull, a portion of the brain also issuing thorough a penetrating wound of the dura and pia mater…

London: Printed by J. M. for Henry Faithorn..., 1682.

Probably the first monograph in English on surgery of the head and brain. Yonge was a naval surgeon who set up in practice in Plymouth after he gave up the sea. He had just performed the operation for an injury of the head outlined in the title of his book when a local physician, Dr. Durston, asserted that wounds of the brain were always fatal. To prove this was untrue, Yonge published this book, which includes details of the operation in great detail, followed by extracts from and references to 65 earlier authors, five of whom are English.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), NEUROSURGERY, NEUROSURGERY › Pediatric Neurosurgery
  • 8837

The body and society: Men, women, and sexual renunciation in early Christianity.

New York: Columbia University Press, 1988.

"A groundbreaking study of the marriage and sexual practices of early Christians in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Brown focuses on the practice of permanent sexual renunciation-continence, celibacy, and lifelong virginity-in Christian circles from the first to the fifth centuries A.D. and traces early Christians' preoccupations with sexuality and the body in the work of the period's great writers.

"The Body and Society questions how theological views on sexuality and the human body both mirrored and shaped relationships between men and women, Roman aristocracy and slaves, and the married and the celibate. Brown discusses Tertullian, Valentinus, Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Constantine, the Desert Fathers, Jerome, Ambrose, and Augustine, among others, and considers asceticism and society in the Eastern Empire, martyrdom and prophecy, gnostic spiritual guidance, promiscuity among the men and women of the church, monks and marriage in Egypt, the ascetic life of women in fourth-century Jerusalem, and the body and society in the early Middle Ages" (publisher)

20th anniversary edition with a new introduction, 2008. 



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Late Antiquity, RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences, SEXUALITY / Sexology › History of Sexuality / Sexology
  • 8838

The Oxford handbook of women and gender in Medieval Europe. Edited by Judith M. Bennett and Ruth Mazo Karras.

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.

Part V "Bodies, pleasures, desires" includes much of medical and biological interest, including a remarkable chapter by Kathryn M. Ringrose on "The Byzantine body."



Subjects: BYZANTINE MEDICINE › History of Byzantine Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 8839

Sexuality in Medieval Europe: Doing unto others.

Abingdon, Oxford & New York: Routledge, 2005.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, SEXUALITY / Sexology › History of Sexuality / Sexology
  • 8840

La médecine de l'Amérique précolombienne.

Paris: Roger Dacosta, 1969.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Latin America, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine, Pre-Columbian Medicine, History of
  • 8841

Atlas of medicinal plants of Middle America: Bahamas to Yucatan.

Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas, 1981.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Bahamas, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Latin America, Latin American Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 8842

Indian Medicine in highland Guatemala: The Pre-Hispanic and colonial periods .

Albuquerque, NM: The University of New Mexico Press, 1987.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Guatemala, Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 8843

Textos de medicina nahuatl.

Mexico: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 1975.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine, Pre-Columbian Medicine, History of
  • 8844

Verdadera medicina, cirugía y astrologia en tres libros dividida.

Mexico: Por Fernando Balli, 1607.

Concerns medicine of the Aztecs, etc. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Medical Astrology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, Latin American Medicine
  • 8845

El mestizaje cultural y la medicina Novohispana del siglo XVI. Edited by J. L. Fequet Febrer and J. M. López Piñero.

Valencia: Instituto de Estudios Documentales e Históricos sobre la Ciencia, 1995.


Subjects: Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine
  • 8846

Viejo y nuevo continente: La medicina en el encuentro de dos mundos. Edited by J. M. López Piñero.

Madrid: Saned, 1992.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Spain, Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine
  • 8847

Simulation in healthcare education: An extensive history.

New York: Springer International Publishing, 2016.

The first history of this topic on the history of mannikins and the unusually wide variety of devices, including interactive software, used in the training of the different specialties in medicine and nursing.



Subjects: COMPUTING/MATHEMATICS in Medicine & Biology › History of Computing / Mathematics in Medicine & Biology, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › History of Biomedical Instrumentation
  • 8848

Apuntes para la historia de la medicina en Michoacán desde los tiempos Pre-Colombianos hasta el año 1875.

Michoacán, Mexico: Morelia, 1886.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine, Pre-Columbian Medicine, History of
  • 8849

Apuntes par la historia de la medicina, cirurgía y obstetricia, en Michoacán desde los tiempos pre-Colombianos, hasta et año 1875.

Michoacán, Mexico: Morelia, 1887.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine, Pre-Columbian Medicine, History of
  • 8850

Primera parte de los problemas y secretos maravillosos de las Indias. (All published).

Mexico: Pedro Ocharte, 1591.

Includes plant and mineral remedies of New Spain as well as natural history details. See DEUCHLER, W. Juan de Cárdenas. Eim Beitrag zur Geschichte der spanischem Naturbetrachtung und Medizin im Mexiko während des 16. Jahrhunderts. (Bern, P. Haupt, 1930). Digital facsimile of the 1913 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, Latin American Medicine
  • 8851

World Digital Library. With the support of UNESCO (the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization) and the U.S. Library of Congress.

Washington, DC: U.S. Library of Congress, 2009.

https://www.wdl.org/en/

"The WDL has stated that its mission is to promote international and intercultural understanding, expand the volume and variety of cultural content on the Internet, provide resources for educators, scholars, and general audiences, and to build capacity in partner institutions to narrow the digital divide within and among countries.[1] It aims to expand non-English and non-western content on the Internet, and contribute to scholarly research. The library intends to make available on the Internet, free of charge and in multilingual format, significant primary materials from cultures around the world, including manuscripts, maps, rare books, musical scores, recordings, films, prints, photographs, architectural drawings, and other significant cultural materials.[2][3][4]" (Wikipedia article on World Digital Library, accessed 01-2017)

Partners in the World Digital Library project include:[18]



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Online Access Catalogues & Bibliographic Databases, DIGITAL RESOURCES › Digital Archives & Libraries
  • 8852

Gold as a remedy in disease, notably in some forms of organic heart disease, angina pectoris, melancholy, tedium vitae, scrofula, syphilis, skin disease, & as an antidote to the ill effects of mercury.

London: Homoeopathic Publishing Co. & Philadelphia: Boericke & Tafel, 1879.

Burnett, a homeopath, provided an excellent summary of the history of gold as it was used in medicine, with extensive references to the historical literature. Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Homeopathy, CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE › Coronary Artery Disease › Angina Pectoris, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Mycosis › Scrofula (Mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis), Minerals and Medicine
  • 8853

Vol. 1: Travels through the low countries, Germany, Italy and France, with curious observations, natural, topographical, moral, physiological, & c. Also, A catalogue of plants, found spontaneously growing in those parts, and their virtues. Vol. 2: A collection of curious travels and voyages. Containing Dr. Leonhart Rauwolff's journey into the eastern countries, viz. Syria, Palestine, or the Holy Land, Armenia, Mesopotamia, Assyria, Chaldea, & c. Translated from the original high Dutch, by Nicholas Staphorst. And also, travels into Greece, Asia, Minor, Egypt, Arabia Felix, Petraea, Ethiopia, the Red Sea, & c. Collected from the observations of Mons. Belon, Prosper Alpinus, Dr. Huntingdon, Mr. Vernon, Sir George Wheeler, Dr. Smith, Mr. Greaves, and others. To which are added three catalogues of such trees, shrubs and herbs as grow in the Levant. By the Rev. John Ray, F. R. S. (2 vols.)

London: For J. Walthoe..., 1738.

This is the second and best edition in 2 volumes of works that were first issued separately in 1673 and 1693 respectively. For Rauwolf see No. 7327. Digital facsimile of the 1738 edition from the Medical Heritage Library, Internet Archive, at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Middle East, VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 8854

Compendio storico della scuola anatomica di Bologna dal Rinascimento delle scienze e delle letters a tutto il secolo XVIII. Con un paragone fra la sua antichità e quella delle scuole di Salerno e di Padova.

Bologna: Tipografia Governativa della Volpe e del Sassi, 1857.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › History of Anatomy, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Italy, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession
  • 8855

Bibliotheca botanica, seu herbarijstarum scriptorum promota synodia...Ia. Antonio Bumaldo [i.e. O. Montalbani], Collectore.

Bologna: typ. Haeredis Benatii, 1657.

The first general bibliography of botany books, including herbals. The author, a prolific writer, often wrote under the pseudonym of Antonio Bumaldo.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Botany / Materia Medica, BOTANY
  • 8856

Bibliotheca botanica sive catalogus auctorum et librorum omnium qui de re botanica, de medicamentis ex vegetabilibus paratis, de re rustica, & de horticultura tractant. Accessit bibliotheca botanica Jo. Ant. Bumaldi seu potius O. Montalbani.

The Hague: J. Neaulme, 1740.

Organized in three parts: floras, medical botany, and horticultural and agricultural works. Séguier includes books, pamphlets, and references in the periodical literature. "The entries for the publications contain usually the title fully transcribed and in the original language, the place of publication, the publisher, the size .... and sometimes a critical commentary and an indication of the location where he saw the book or found a reference to it. These statements of location are obviously of great importance because they will very often allow us at once to identify the library where the publications are presently located....A useful feature is the provision of marginal notes giving relevant references to reviews, publication, comments or other secondary publications relevant to the main entry...." (Stafleu & Cowan 11624). Includes a reprint of Montalbani's bibliography of 1657. Digital facsimile of the 1740 edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Agriculture / Horticulture, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Botany / Materia Medica, BOTANY › History of Botany, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 8857

Taxonomic literature: A selective guide to botanical publications and collections with dates, commentaries and types. By Frans A. Stafleu and Richard S. Cowan. Second edition. 7 vols. (1976-1988) plus 8 supplements (1992-2009).

Utrecht: Bohn, Scheltema & Holkema, 19762009.

The entire set is available in digital facsimile from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link. (Authors and publishers of the Supplements vary.)



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Botany / Materia Medica, BOTANY › Classification / Systemization of Plants, BOTANY › History of Botany
  • 8858
BIODIVERSITY HERITAGE LIBRARY

Biodiversity Heritage Library

2005.

http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/

"The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) is a consortium of natural history and botanical libraries that cooperate to digitize the legacy literature of biodiversity held in their collections and to make that literature available for open access and responsible use as a part of a global “biodiversity commons.” The BHL consortium works with the international taxonomic community, rights holders, and other interested parties to ensure that this biodiversity heritage is made available to a global audience through open access principles. In partnership with the Internet Archive and through local digitization efforts, the BHL has digitized millions of pages of taxonomic literature, representing over 100,000 titles and over 170,000 volumes.

"Much of the published literature on biological diversity is available in only a few select libraries in the developed world. These collections are of exceptional value because the domain of systematic biology depends, more than any other science, upon historic literature. Yet, this wealth of knowledge is available only to those few who can gain direct access to significant library collections. Literature about the biota existing in developing countries is often not available within their own borders. Biologists have long considered that access to the published literature is one of the chief impediments to the efficiency of research in the field. Free global access to digital literature repatriates information about the earth’s species to all parts of the world.

"The BHL consortium members digitize the public domain books and journals held within their collections. To acquire additional content and promote free access to information, the BHL has also obtained permission from publishers to digitize and make available significant biodiversity materials that are still under copyright.

"Because of BHL’s success in digitizing a significant mass of biodiversity literature, the study of living organisms has become more efficient. The BHL Portal allows users to search the corpus by multiple access points, read the texts online, or download select pages or entire volumes as PDF files.

"The BHL serves texts with information on over a 150 million species names. Using Global Names Recognition and Discovery (GNRD) and UBio’s taxonomic name finding tools, researchers can bring together publications about species and find links to related content in the Encyclopedia of Life. Because of its commitment to open access, BHL provides a range of services and APIs which allow users to harvest source data files and reuse content for research purposes. BHL also serves as the foundational literature component of the Encyclopedia of Life .

"Since 2009, the BHL has expanded globally. The European Commission’s eContentPlus program has funded the BHL Europe project, with 28 institutions, to assemble the European language literature. Additionally, the Chinese Academy of Sciences (BHL China), the Atlas of Living Australia (BHL Australia), Brazil (through BHL SciELO), the Bibliotheca Alexandrina(BHL Egypt), and the South African National Biodiversity Institute (BHL Africa) have created national or regional BHL nodes. Additionally, in 2014, the National Library Board of Singapore became the first institution to join BHL as both a Member of BHL and a global node (BHL Singapore). Global nodes are organizational structures that may or may not develop their own BHL portals. It is the goal of BHL to share and serve content through the BHL Portal developed and maintained at the Missouri Botanical Garden. These projects will work together to share content, protocols, services, and digital preservation practices."



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Online Access Catalogues & Bibliographic Databases, BOTANY, DIGITAL RESOURCES › Digital Archives & Libraries , NATURAL HISTORY, ZOOLOGY
  • 8859

Bloody brilliant! A history of blood groups and blood groupers.

Bethesda, MD: AABB, 2016.


Subjects: HEMATOLOGY › Blood Groups, HEMATOLOGY › History of Hematology
  • 8860

Rariora Musei Besleriani quae olim Basilius et Michael Rupertus Besleri collegerunt, aenesique tabulis ad vivum incisa evulgarunt: nunc commentariolo illustrata a Johanne Henrico Lochnero…

Nuremberg, 1716.

The most complete description of the natural history museum of Basilius Besler and his nephew Michael Rupert. It contains the first descriptive commentary of the collection, with 40 engraved plates. The Besler collection was partly illustrated in earlier publications: the elder Besler’s own “Fasciculus” of 1616, and his nephew’s “Gazophylacium” of 1642. However, both of those publications consisted of plates only. Digital facsimile from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Natural History Museums / Wunderkammern
  • 8861

Note overo memorie del museo di Lodovico Moscardo....Nel primo si disorre delle cose antiche, le quali in detto museo si trouano. Nel secondo delle petre, minerali, e terre. Nel terzo de corali, conchiglie, animali, frutti, & altre cose in quello contenute.

Padua: Paolo Frambotto, 1656.

Moscardo's museum contained natural history specimens, archeological remains, and ethnographic objects. Around 1642 Moscardo acquired a portion of the collection of Francesco Calceolari and added it to his museum. Digital facsimile of the 1656 edition from the Internet Archive at this link. The second edition (Verona,1672) was greatly expanded with a disquisition by Athanasius Kircher on a Canopic urn owned by Moscardo. Digital facsimile of the 1672 edition from the Getty Research Institute, Internet Archive, at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Natural History Museums / Wunderkammern
  • 8862

A ciéncia dos trópicos: A arte médica no Brasil do sécolo XVIII.

São Paulo, Brazil: Editora Hucitec, 1997.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine, TROPICAL Medicine › History of Tropical Medicine
  • 8863

Herbal medicine past and present. Vol. 1: Trying to give ease: Tommie Bass and the story of herbal medicine. Vol. 2: A reference guide to medicinal plants: Herbal medicine past and present.

Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1989.


Subjects: BOTANY › Ethnobotany, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines › History of Materia Medica
  • 8864

Home medicine: The Newfoundland experience.

Montréal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1994.

"Based on material from the Folklore Archives at Memorial University as well as other sources, Crellin's catalogue includes such topics as abortion, baldness and hair preparations, blood-letting, cancer, drunkenness, female complaints, Gin Pills, herbs, midwifery and childbirth, Newfoundland stomach, poultices, prepared cures, rheumatism and arthritis, and tonics. Looking at the interplay between mainstream physicians and alternative treatments, and the effect of folk beliefs on today's self-care practices, Crellin examines how the advent of modern medicine has affected self-treatment" (publisher).



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine
  • 8865

Foundations of physiological psychology.

New York: Harper & Row, 1967.


Subjects: PSYCHOLOGY, PSYCHOLOGY › Biological
  • 8866

Thought reform and the psychology of totalism. A study of "brainwashing" in China.

New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 1961.


Subjects: PSYCHIATRY, PSYCHOLOGY
  • 8867

The beautiful brain: The drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal. Edited with commentaries by Eric A. Newman, Alfonso Araque, and Janet M. Dubinsky. Essays by Larry W. Swanson, Lyndel King, and Eric Himmel.

New York: Abrams, 2017.

A spectacular volume reproducing Ramón y Cajal's drawings in very high quality, and with significant commentaries.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy, ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy › History of Neuroanatomy, ART & Medicine & Biology
  • 8868

Medicinal plants in folk tradition: An ethnobotany of Britain and Ireland.

Portland, OR: Timber Press, 2004.

The first comprehensive account of medicinal uses of wild plants by the country folk of Britain and Ireland based on manuscript folklore sources as well as published sources. These included information gathered by the Irish Folklore Commission in more than 1000 manuscript volumes. This previously unpublished material constitutes a medical tradition that was previously overlooked by historians. The work chronicles the usage of more than 400 plant species.



Subjects: BOTANY › Ethnobotany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Ireland, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine
  • 8869

Medicina Britannica; or, a treatise on such physical plants as are generally to be found in the fields or gardens of Great-Britain: Containing a particular account of their nature, virtues, and uses. Together with the observations of the most learned physicians, as well ancient as modern, communicated to the late ingenious Mr. Ray, and the learned Dr. Sim. Pauli. Adapted more especially to the occasions of those, whose condition or situation of life deprives them, in a great measure, of the helps of the learned. To which are added, three indexes: The first containing the England and Latin names of the plants treated of: The second of the diseases, and their remedies: The third to the notes.

London: R. Manby, 1746.

Short focused his book on the medical uses of plants readily available in England. Many of the plants recommended in the traditional herbal literature were difficult to find in England. Digital facsimile from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Ethnobotany, Household or Self-Help Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 8870

A description of the Western Islands of Scotland.: Containing a full account of their situation, extent, soils, product, harbours, bays, tides, anchoring places, and fisheries. The ancient and modern government, religion and customs of the inhabitants, particularly of their druids, heathen temples, monasteries, churches, chappels, antiquities, monuments, forts, caves, and other curiosities of art and nature. Of their admirable and expeditious way of curing most diseases by simples of their own product. A particular account of the second sight, or faculty of forseeing things to come, by way of vision, so common among them. A brief hint of methods to improve trade in that country, both by sea and land. With a new map of the whole, describing the harbours, anchoring places, and dangerous rocks, for the benefit of sailers. To which is added a brief description of the Isles of Orkney, and Schetland.

London: Andrew Bell, 1703.

Martin, who graduated MD from Leiden, included throughout his book detailed and non-judgmental documentation of folk medicine practices and ethnobotanic remedies then in use in the region. Digital facsimile of the 1703 edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Ethnobotany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Scotland, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine, VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 8871

Irish ethno-botany and the evolution of medicine in Ireland.

Dublin: M. H. Gill & Son, 1919.

A discussion of Irish materia medica and a summary of the development of medicine in Ireland from the earliest times. Indices in Gaelic and English. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Ethnobotany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Ireland, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine
  • 8872

Sildenafil: an orally active type 5 cyclic GMP-specific phosphodiesterase inhibitor for the treatment of penile erectile dysfunction.

Int. J. Impot. Res., 8 (2) 47-52, 1996.

Osterloh and team working at Pfizer's Sandwich, Kent research facility in England, demonstrated that sildenafil citrate (Viagra) initally studied for use in hypertension and angina pectoris, is effective in the treatment of penile erectile disfunction. (With 6 co-authors).

"Abstract:

"Sildenafil (Viagra, UK-92,480) is a novel oral agent under development for the treatment of penile erectile dysfunction. Erection is dependent on nitric oxide and its second messenger, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). However, the relative importance of phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes is not clear. We have identified both cGMP- and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs) in human corpora cavernosa in vitro. The main PDE activity in this tissue was due to PDE5, with PDE2 and 3 also identified. Sildenafil is a selective inhibitor of PDE5 with a mean IC50 of 0.0039 microM. In human volunteers, we have shown sildenafil to have suitable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties (rapid absorption, relatively short half-life, no significant effect on heart rate and blood pressure) for an oral agent to be taken, as required, prior to sexual activity. Moreover, in a clinical study of 12 patients with erectile dysfunction without an established organic cause, we have shown sildenafil to enhance the erectile response (duration and rigidity of erection) to visual sexual stimulation, thus highlighting the important role of PDE5 in human penile erection. Sildenafil holds promise as a new effective oral treatment for penile erectile dysfunction."

 

 


Subjects: CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE › Hypertension (High Blood Pressure), PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Erectile Dysfunction Medication, SEXUALITY / Sexology, UROLOGY
  • 8873

Textes Grecs inédits relatifs aux plantes.

Paris: Société d'Edition Les Belles Lettres, 1955.

Previously unpublished ancient Greek textes on botany, with French translations. 



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, BOTANY, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 8874

Pristina medicamenta: Ancient and medieval medical botany. By Jerry W. Stannard. Edited by Katherine E. Stannard and Richard Kay.

Aldershot, England: Ashgate, 1999.


Subjects: BOTANY › History of Botany, PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines › History of Materia Medica
  • 8875

Three receptaria from Medieval England: The languages of medicine in the fourteenth century. Edited by Tony Hunt with the collaboration of Michael Benskin.

Oxford: Society for the Study of Medieval Languages and Literature, 2001.

An edition of just over 1500 medical receipts transmitted in three fourteenth-century compendia. The particular interest of these multilingual compilations lies in their date – earlier than most published receipts – and their showing the three languages of medieval England in vigorous and simultaneous use. There are detailed indexes, including a survey of the medical conditions covered, and the notes provide comprehensive references to analogous receipts in other published collections, so shedding light on the processes of compilation and transmission.



Subjects: BOTANY › Medical Botany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 8876

A leechbook or collection of medical receipts of the fifteenth century: The text of ms. no. 136 of the Medical Society of London, together with a transcript into modern spelling, transcribed and edited with an introduction, notes and appendix by Warren R. Dawson.

London: Macmillan, 1934.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England
  • 8877

Popular medicine in thirteenth-century England: Introduction and texts.

Cambridge, England: Boydell & Brewer, 1990.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine
  • 8878

Obras médicas de Pedro Hispano. Edited by Maria Helena da Rocha Pereira.

Coimbra, Portugal: Por Ordem da Universidade, 1973.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Spain, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Spain
  • 8879

Medieval herbal remedies. The old English herbarium and Anglo-Saxon medicine.

New York & London: Routledge, 2002.

Edition and translation of the Old English Herbarium, British Library Cotton MS Vitellius C iii, the only illustrated Anglo-Saxon medical text, dating from about 1000 CE, containing information on 185 medicinal plants, the names of conditions for which they are beneficial, and directions for making remedies with them. This text was previously translated inaccurately by Cockayne (No. 6534). For a facsimile edition of the manuscript see No. 8889.

"The Herbarium, attributed wrongly to Apuleius Platonicus, was one of a number of Old English Texts--occupying some thousand manuscript pages--that mark the first flowering of vernacular medical writing in medieval Europe. It is an expanded version of a late Roman tratise that survives in Old English in four manuscripts, one of them strikingly illustrated (British Library Cotton MSS, Vitellius C. iii). This text is by no means a mindless translation of mediterranean herbal remedies; rather it displays practical knowledge of plants widely available in Anglo-Saxon England through cultivation and import. Van Arsdall adds to our understanding of the uses of this text by drawing on present-day curandera practices in the south-western United States. She makes the cogent argument that texts like the Old English Herbarium served as aide-mémoire for the apprenticeship system that trains traditional healers" (from the Foreward by Linda Ehrsam Voigts, p. x).

 



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England › Anglo-Saxon Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 8880

Libri medicinae Sexti Placiti Papyriensis ex animalibus pecoribus et bestiis vel avibus Concordantiae. Edited by Maria Paola Segolini.

Hildesheim & New York: Olms-Weidmann, 1998.

Placitus wrote fanciful descriptions of medicines derived from animals, and other sources. For example, he recommended such remedies as consuming cooked puppy to relieve colic, and breaking a fever by cutting a splinter from the door that a eunuch has just passed through. (Wikipedia).



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Late Antiquity, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, PHARMACOLOGY
  • 8881

Fundamentos racionales y condiciones téchnicas de la Investigación biológica.

Madrid: L. Aguado, 1897.

For the second edition (Madrid: Fortanet1899) Ramón y Cajal changed the title to Reglas y consejos sobre investigación cientifica. He added Los tónicos de la voluntad to the fourth ediition (Madrid: Fortanet, 1916). Neely Swanson and Larry W. Swanson translated the fourth edition into English as Advice for a young investigator (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press,1999).



Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design
  • 8882

William Osler's collected papers on the cardiovascular system. Edited by W. Bruce Fye.

Birmingham, England: Classics of Cardiology Library, 1985.

Includes a previously unpublished essay by Maude Abbott, "Osler's contributions to our knowledge of heart disease."



Subjects: CARDIOLOGY, CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY › Cardiovascular System
  • 8883

The collected essays of Sir William Osler. 3 vols. Edited by John P. McGovern and Charles G. Roland.

Birmingham, AL: Classics of Medicine Library, 1985.

Vol. 1: The philosophical essays. Vol. 2: The educational essays. Vol. 3: The historical and biographical essays.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works), Collected Works: Opera Omnia, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 8884

First [Second] report of the commissioners for inquiring into the state of large towns and populous districts [Appendix- Part II].

London: William Clowes & Sons, 18441845.

The publication of Chadwick's 1842 Report inspired the creation in 1843 of the Royal Commission for Inquiry into the State of Large Towns and Populous Districts, in which Chadwick once again played a leading role, drafting the major part of the Commission's first report and supplying the administrative and operational proposals for the second. The Commission's two reports revealed the unhealthy sanitary and social conditions prevailing among the towns and proposed a number of recommendations to be embodied in new legislation, the most important being a proposal to grant the national government power to supervise the execution of all general measures for regulating the sanitary condition of larger urban communities.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 8885

Group medicine & health insurance in action.

New York: Crown Publishers, 1949.

"The Health Insurance Plan of Greater New York was established in March, 1947 for the specific purpose of accumulating the required experience under carefully controlled conditions. In order to assemble measurable data, medical services are provided solely by groups of physicians and specialists workiing together as complete units or teams paid on a per capita basis.The 700 physicians who now serve the approximately 200,000 persons now insured with the HIP are organized into major boroughs of the city. Two groups were established by teaching institutions: New York University College of Medicine and Montefiore Hospital, a teaching unit of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. All other groups are partnerships, of whiich the Central Medical Group of Brooklyn is an example. This group, with the largest enrollment in HIP, is now providing complete medical care, preventive as well as curative, for more than 20,000 persons.

"This volume is a report by the Central Medical Group of Brooklyn of its experiences during the first two years. It reflects the continued enthusiasm of its physician members for group practice of medicine under a prepayment plan. Its experience reveals the number of physicians' services required annually by the population which it serves, the volume of specialist and laboratory services, the administrative cost involved in operating the medical center, and the net income remaining from the per capita payments by HIP for the remuneration of the physicians...." (pp. xxi-xxii)



Subjects: ECONOMICS, BIOMEDICAL, Insurance, Health
  • 8886

Coming to terms with world health: The League of Nations Health Organization 1921-1946.

Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2009.


Subjects: Global Health, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health
  • 8887

International studies of the relation between the private & official practice of medicine with special reference to the prevention of disease. Vol. 1: The Netherlands, Scandinavia, Germany, Austria, Switzerland. Vol. 2: Belgium, France, Italy, Jugo-Slavia, Hungary, Poland, Czecho-Slovakia. Vol. 3: England and Wales, Scotland, Ireland.(3 vols.)

London: G. Allen & Unwin & Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins, 1931.

Contains almost no references to prior literature.



Subjects: ECONOMICS, BIOMEDICAL, PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 8888

Innovations médicales en situations humanitaires: La travail de Médecins Sans Frontières.

Paris: L'Harmattan, 2011.

Translated into English as Medical innovations in humanitarian situations: The work of Médecins San Frontières (20).



Subjects: Global Health
  • 8889

The Old English illustrated pharmacopoeia. British Library Cotton Vitellius C III. Edited by M. A. D'Aronco and M. L. Cameron. Early English Manuscripts in Facsimile, 27.

Copenhagen: Rosenkilde & Bagger, 1998.

Macer glosses, Pseudo-Apuleius, Herbarium, Macrobius, etc. 12th century.

"A composite manuscript which comprises four parts, Parts 1 and 2 contain items in English, Part 3 contains Macrobius, "Saturnalia" and Part 4 includes Cotton's notes (see, British Library Catalogue, and Doane 1994, pp. 20-25).

Part 1, fols 5-10, contains text copied in s. xii hands: Fols 5r-10: Peter of Poitiers, Compendium Historiae in Genealogia Christi. Fol. 10v, chapter titles of Macer, De viribus herbarum. Chapters 10, 11, 13-19, 22 and 37 are glossed in English in a different hand, s. xii, to that of the main text. There are also some annotations in Anglo-Norman (see, Doane 1994, p. 21; Ker 1957, p. 283; Gough 1974, pp. 285-87; Bierbaumer 1976, p. xxi).

Part 2, fols 11-85: the table of contents, the translation of the enlarged Herbarius Apuleii and of the Medicina de quadrupedius are from s. xi1. Part 2 also contains: Fol. 11r, s. xii, annotations around a hole (Doane 1994, p. 21; Voigts 1976, p. 258). Fols 12r-18v, table of content of the 'Herbarius', followed by 185 chapters of the translation of Herbarius Apuleii, titled '[H]ERBARIVM | APVL[EI] [P]LAT[ONICI] | QVOD AC[CE]PIT AB E|SCOLA[P]IO ET [A] CH[I]RONE CENTAVRO: MAGISTRO | ACHILLIS' on fols 19v-74v, and a translation in Old English of Medicina de quadrupedibus beginning 'SAGAÐ ÐÆT ÆGYP | ta cyning idpartus Æ¿æs haten' on fols 75-82v (de Vriend 1984 and Cockayne 1864-66). A s. xii hand probably added the chapters in the table of contents: I- CLXXIX and, as Ker 1957 notes, the chapter numbers in the upper margin of most pages are also in this hand.

Fol. 17v contains a note in Old English, s. xii, 'Se unbrade þistel he havat | Æ¿iplete (?) hauod' (Ker 1957, p. 284, and Doane 1994, p. 22). Fol. 18v is partially blank and contains recipes in Old English Ad uertiginem, 'Num betonica Ë¥ Æ¿æll sÆ¿yðe on Æ¿in | oþþa on ald ealað' and Ad pectoris dolorem, 'Num horsellens Ë¥ eft geÆ¿ænen bare' s. xi2 (Ker 1957, p. 284, Cockayne 1864-66, 1, 378). Fols 82v-83 contain four recipes in Old English in three hands. The first two recipes, fols 82v/21-83r/11, 'Ðis is seo seleste eah salf' and, fol. 83r/12-19, 'Ðis mæg to eah salfe', are in the same hand as that of the recipes on fol. 18v. Fols 83r/20-31, the third recipe is in a s. xi hand, 'Æ¿ið lungen adle' (Cockayne 1864-66, 1, 374). Fols 83r/1-15, the fourth is in a s. xii hand 'Æ¿ið fot adle' (Cockayne 1864-66, 1, 376). On fol. 83, eight Latin recipes, and two chams in a s.xiiiin hand. On fol. 83r/27, 'warantiÄ™' is glossed 'Æ¿ret' (Ker 1957, pp. 284-85 and Doane 1994, p. 22)" ( http://www.le.ac.uk/english/em1060to1220/mss/EM.BL.Vite.C.iii.htm , accessed 04-2017).

In 2017 the British Library published a digital facsimile of Cotton Vitellius C III online at this link. The modern English translation is by van Arsdall No. 8879)

 



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England › Anglo-Saxon Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, PHARMACOLOGY › Pharmacopeias
  • 8890

Etude médico-légale sur les sévices et mauvais traitements exercés sur des enfants.

Annales d'hygiène publique et de médecine légale, 2e Serie, 13, 361-398, 1860.

The first medical-legal study of child abuse, including sexual abuse, incest, and the "battered child" syndrome. Tardieu described 32 cases in detail, 18 of which resulted in death. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine), PEDIATRICS, PSYCHIATRY › Child Psychiatry
  • 8891

Étude médico-légale sur les attentats aux moeurs.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1857.

“Extrait des Annales d’hygiène publique et de médicine légale, 2e série, tome VIII." Tardieu divided his book on "sexual crimes" into three parts: the first deals with indecent exposures, the second with rape, and the third with "pederasty" (sexual relations between an older and a younger man), written before the term homosexuality was coined.

Tardieu analyzed 632 cases of sexual abuse in females (mostly children) and 302 cases in males, describing physical signs according to the severity of the abuse.

Neither the first or the second (1858) editions were illustrated. The third edition (1859) contained 3 plates, two of which showed evidence of abuse in female genitalia. The fourth edition (1862) was the first to include a fourth plate depicting a passive male sodomite's anus. Digital facsimiles of the first and second editions are available from BnF Gallica. Digital facsimile of the expanded fifth edition (1867) from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine), PSYCHIATRY › Child Psychiatry, PSYCHIATRY › Forensic Psychiatry, SEXUALITY / Sexology › Homosexuality
  • 8892

Dictionnaire d'hygiène publique et de salubrité ou répertoire de toutes les questions relatives à la santé publique, considérées dans leurs rapports avec les subsistances, les épidémies, les professions, les établissements et institutions d'hygiène et de salubrité, complété par le texte des lois, décrets, arrêtés, ordonnances et instructions qui s'y rattachen. 3 vols.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1854.

For the second edition (1862) Tardieu expanded the work to 4 volumes. Tardieu described the terrible working conditions of children in factories and mines. He also reported the ill consequences of theses conditions on the children's physical and mental health.
Digital facsimile of the first edition from Google Books at this link; of the second edition (1862) from BnF Gallica at this link.



Subjects: Dictionaries, Biomedical, Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine), OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE , PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 8893

The battered-child syndrome.

J.A.M.A., 181, 17-24, 1962.

"In 1962, Dr. C. Henry Kempe and his colleagues led the identification and recognition of child abuse with the defining paper, The Battered Child Syndrome. This paper was regarded as the single most significant event in creating awareness and exposing the reality of child abuse. It gave doctors a way to understand and identify child abuse and neglect, along with information about how to report suspected abuse" (http://www.kempe.org/about/history/, accessed 02-2017).



Subjects: Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine), PEDIATRICS, PSYCHIATRY › Child Psychiatry, PSYCHIATRY › Forensic Psychiatry
  • 8894

Child psychiatry.

Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas, 1935.

Leo Kanner, an Austrian émigré and medical graduate of the University of Berlin, founded the first academic department of child psychiatry under the direction of Adolf Meyer at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Kanner was the first U. S. physician to be identified as a child psychiatrist, and his textbook, Child Psychiatry (1935), introduced both the specialty and the term to the English speaking academic community.



Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › Child Psychiatry
  • 8895

Le médecin et la médecine dans le théatre comique français du XVIIe siecle. (Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis).

Uppsala, Sweden: Almqvist & Wiksell, 1991.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 8896

Litterature et medécine: Approaches et perspectives (XVIe-XIXe siècles). Edited by Andrea Carlino and Alexandre Wenger.

Geneva: Librairie Droz, 2007.


Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 8897

Médecine, sciences de la vie et littérature en France et en Europe, de la révolution à nos jours. 3 vols. Edited by Lisa Dumusay-Queffélec and Hélène Spengler.

Geneva: Librairie Droz, 2014.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 8898

Medical life. Edited by Victor Robinson. (214 issues were published, beginning with vol. 27 and ending with vol. 45 because Robinson considered this a merger of five earlier medical periodicals.)

New York, 19201938.

"the first monthly journal in English to be devoted to the history of medicine. Robinson opened the pages of Medical Life to eminent historians and beginners. A number of outstanding European medical historians contributed papers and served on its editorial board. Among them were Max Neuburger, Karl Sudhoff, Henry E. Sigerist, Arturo Castiglioni, John D. Comrie, and Wilhelm Haberling….Victor Robinson was a member of the generation that created medical history in this country as we know it today. He banged the drums for medical history, he blew its horn, he was a propagandist for medical history. He aroused interest in the subject and made it possible for interested individuals to participate in the medical history movement. He accomplished this chiefly through the channels of communication which he created, chiefly Medical Life.” (George Rosen, Victor Robinson: A romantic medical historian. [Philadelphia 1958]).



Subjects: Periodicals Specializing in the History of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 8899

White caps: The story of nursing.

Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1946.


Subjects: NURSING › History of Nursing