An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15423 entries, 13280 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 17, 2021

Browse by Entry Number 12500–12599

100 entries
  • 12500

Marching on Tanga (with General Smuts in East Africa).

London: W. Collins Sons & Co., 1917.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Africa, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I, VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 12501

Sulle virtù igieniche e medicinali della coca e sugli alimenti nervosi in generale.

Ann. univ. Med. (Milano), 31, 449-519, 1859.

After a four-year stay in South America Mantegazza published this report on medical observations on the use of Erythroxylon coca leaves of the populations in the places where he stayed and practiced. He reported that, as a result of the drug, natives who constantly chewed a bolus of coca leaves and ingested their juice, exhibited great energy and resistance to hunger, cold, humidity, bad weather and hard work, even in places of high altitude.

Mantegazza also reported that coca leaves, taken as an infusion or chewed, recovered from the most varied gastrointestinal affections. He also reported cases of abuse and the onset of addiction to coca, and the results of the experiments he carried out on himself with the ingestion of increasing quantities of the juice of the chewed coca leaves.

The Wikipedia article on Mantegazza quoted his expression of the high experienced as a result of the drug:

"... I sneered at the poor mortals condemned to live in this valley of tears while I, carried on the wings of two leaves of coca, went flying through the spaces of 77,438 words, each more splendid than the one before...An hour later, I was sufficiently calm to write these words in a steady hand: God is unjust because he made man incapable of sustaining the effect of coca all life long. I would rather have a life span of ten years with coca than one of 10 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 centuries without coca."

Sigmund Freud cited Mantegazza's report in his work Über Coca (1884). That paper concerned the studies of the effects on man of cocaine, the alkaloid extracted from the coca leaves by the chemist Albert Niemann in 1859, rather than coca leaves, themselves.
See Guiliano Dall'Olio, "Paolo Mantegazza: memoria sulle proprietà terapeutiche della coca," Riv. Ital. Med. Lab., 7 (2011) 228-239.



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Cocaine
  • 12502

Gli amori degli uomini. Saggio di una etnologie dell'amore. 2 vols.

Milan: Paolo Mantegazza, Editore, 1885.

Digital facsimile of the 1886 edition from the Hathi Trust at this link.

Translated into English "from the latest Italian edition, as approved by the author, by Samuel Putnam, edited with an introduction by Victor Robinson" as Sexual relations of mankind, New York: Eugenics Publishing Company (1935).



Subjects: SEXUALITY / Sexology
  • 12503

Fisologia dell' amore.

Milan: Presso Giuseppe Bernardoni e la Libreria Brigola, 1872.

Through many editions and translations of his three main works of sexuality (cited in this database) Mantagazza may have been the most widely read author on sexuality in the 19th century. He was also a widely published author on various other topics.

See V. Sigusch, "The birth of sexual medicine: Paolo Mantegazza as pioneer of sexual medicine in the 19th century," J. Sex. Med., 5, 217-222.

Digital facsimile of the 1875 second edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: SEXUALITY / Sexology
  • 12504

Igiene dell' amore

Milan: Libreria Brigola, 1877.

Digital facsimile of the Milan, 1891 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: SEXUALITY / Sexology
  • 12505

The physiology of love and other writings. Edited, with an introduction and notes by Nicoletta Pireddu. Translated by David Jacobson.

Toronto, Canada: University of Toronto Press, 2007.


Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Cultural Anthropology, SEXUALITY / Sexology
  • 12506

Bibliographiae stomatologicae.

Buffalo, NY: [Privately Printed], 1922.

An extensively annotated historical bibliography of dental bibliographies. Also published in Arthur D. Black, ed., Index of the periodical dental literature.... for 1916-1920 (Chicago, 1922) pp. xiv-liii. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.

On p. 29 Weber claims to have compiled a bibliography of over 12,500 books, dissertations, and pamphlets concerning dentistry from 1490 to 1921. This huge multi-volume catalogue remained unpublished, and existed, he stated, in only a single manuscript copy.




Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Dentistry, DENTISTRY › History of Dentistry, DENTISTRY › Oral Pathology
  • 12507

The microscopic anatomy of the teeth.

London: Henry Frowde & Oxford University Press, 1919.

Digital facsimile of the 1919 edition from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link. Mummery substantially expanded and retitled the second edition of this work as The microscopic & general anatomy of the teeth human and comparative. London: Humphrey Milford, Oxford University Press, 1924. Digital facsimile of the second edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Microscopic Anatomy (Histology), DENTISTRY › Dental Anatomy & Physiology
  • 12508

Traité de la carie dentaire: Recherches expérimentales et thérapeutiques.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière et fils, 1867.

From the English translation:

"The proceding considerations tend to establish that dental caries results from a purely chemical alteration of the enamel and ivory of the teeth either by the products of acid fermentation developed in the saliva or by active agents introduced directly into the mouth. Now, if this theory be correct, we should be able to obtain the same effects by subjecting sound human teeth out of the body and deprived of life to the direct action of the same agents which produce this affection in the economy. This is in fact possible, and we shal lrelate and develop a series of experments by which, sometimes in the mouth and under the ordinary conditions of develpment of natural caries, sometimes in liquids artifically prepared, we have produced changes identical with that of this malady.
"Thus will be demonstrated, as it seems, without doubt, the true nature of dental caries, which it will be impossible to regard henceforward as an affection of internal and organic origin or a vital lesion of nutrition, as has been generally believed up to this time"

Digital facsimile from Wellcomecollection.org at this link. Translated into English by Thomas H. Chandler as Treatise on dental caries. Experimental and therapeutic investigations. Boston: Houghton, Osgood and Company, 1878. Digitial facsimile of the English translation from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: DENTISTRY › Dental Pathology › Tooth Decay
  • 12509

Exhibit for dentistry at a Century of Progress International Exposition, Chicago, 1933-1934: A portrayal of problems of dental health and the prevention of dental disease with which is interwoven something of the development of the profession and the history of dental practice. Booklet prepared by Arthur D. Black. Exhibit operated under auspices of American Dental Association [and] Chicago Dental Society, by the Chicago Centennial Dental Congress, Chicago.

Chicago, IL: American Dental Association, 1934.

Illustrated 64-page brochure recording in detail an exhibition that was seen supposedly by 8,000,000 people. Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: DENTISTRY, DENTISTRY › History of Dentistry
  • 12510

Greek thought, Arabic culture: The Graeco-Arabic translation movement in Baghadad and early Abbāsid Society (2nd-4th/8th centuries).

London: Routledge, 1998.


Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE › History of Islamic or Arab Medicine
  • 12511

A literary history of medicine: The ʿUyūn al-anbāʾ fī ṭabaqāt al-aṭibbāʾ of Ibn Abī Uṣaybiʿah. Edited and translated, with essays, by Emilie Savage-Smith, Simon Swain, and Geert Jan van Gelder. With Ignacio Sánchez, N. Peter Joosse, Alasdair Watson, Bruce Inksetter, and Franak Hilloowala. 5 vols.

Leiden: Brill, 2020.


Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE › History of Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine
  • 12512

Ibn Abī Uṣaybiʿah, Anecdotes and antidotes: A medieval Arabic history of physicians. A new translation. Translated by Emilie Savage-Smith, Simon Swain et al. Selected and edited by Henrietta Sharp Cockrell, with introduction by Geert Jan van Gelder. [Oxford World’s Classics].

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020.


Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE › History of Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine
  • 12513

A new catalogue of Arabic manuscripts in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. Vol. 1: Medicine.

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Institutional Medical Libraries, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine
  • 12514

The key to medicine and a guide for students, by Abū al-Faraj ʿAlī ibn al-Ḥ usayn ibn Hindū. Translated by Aida Tibi and reviewed by E. Savage-Smith [The Great Books of Islamic Civilization Series, The Center for Muslim Contribution to Civilization, Faculty of Islamic Studies, Qatar Foundation, Doha, Qatar].

Reading, England, 2010.


Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine
  • 12515

The year 1000: Medical practice at the end of the first millennium. Edited by Peregrine Horden and Emile Savage-Smith.

Social History of Medicine, 13, no. 2, 2000.

Special issue of: Social history of medicine. Content:

The millennium bug : health and medicine around the year 1000 / Peregrine Horden --
The practice of medicine in England about the year 1000 / Audrey Meaney --
Dr. Monk's medical digest / Klaus-Dietrich Fischer --
Medicine and hagiography in Italy c. 800-c. 1000 / Clare Pilsworth --
Signs and senses : diagnosis and prognosis in early medieval pulse and urine texts / Faith Wallis --
Medical practice and manuscripts in Byzantium / David Bennett --
Practice versus theory : tenth-century case histories from the Islamic Middle East / Cristina Alvarez-Mill©Łn --
The practice of surgery in Islamic lands : myth and reality / Emilie Savage-Smith.



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine
  • 12516

The diffusion of Greco-Roman medicine into the Middle East and the Caucasus. Edited by J.A.C. Greppin, E. Savage-Smith, and J. L. Gueriguian.

Delmar, NY, 1999.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › History of Ancient Medicine & Biology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Armenia, ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE › History of Islamic or Arab Medicine
  • 12517

The Prophet's medicine: A creation of the Muslim traditionalist scholars (Studia Orientalia 74)

Helsinki: Finnish Oriental Society, 1995.


Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine
  • 12518

Avicenne, Poème de la médecine, Urgūza fi' t-tibb, Cantica Avicennae.

Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1956.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 12519

Die arabischen Lehrbücher der Augenheilkunde. Ein Capitel zur arabischen Litteraturegeschichte. Unter Mitwirkung von J. Lippert und E. Mittwoch. Bearbeitet von J. Hirschberg.

Berlin: Verlag der Königl. Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1905.

Digital facsimile of the 1905 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.

Translated into English as The  Arabian Ophthalmologists, compiled from original texts by J. Hirschberg, J. Lippert and E. Mittwoch and translated into English, ed. M. Zafer Wafai (Riyadh: King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, 1993.)

 


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, OPHTHALMOLOGY › History of Ophthalmology
  • 12520

Das Ergebnis des Nachdenkens über die Behandlung der Augenkrankheiten von Fath ad-Dīn al-Qaisī. Übersetzung des arabischen Textes, Kommentar von Hans-Dieter Bischoff.

Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1988.


Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, OPHTHALMOLOGY › History of Ophthalmology
  • 12521

Die Dioskurides-Erklärung des Ibn-al-Baitār: Ein Beitrag zur arabischen Pfanzensynonymik des Mittelalters. Edited and translated by Albert Dietrich. (Abhandlungen der Akademie der Wissenschaften in Göttingen, phil.-hist. Kl., fol. 3, no. 191).

Göttingen: Vandenhoeck und Ruprecht, 1991.


Subjects: BOTANY › Medical Botany, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine
  • 12522

Die Erganzung Ibn Gulgul's zur Materia Medica des Dioskurides: Arabischer Text nebst kommentierter deutscher Ubersetzung herausgegeben von Albert Dietrich.

Göttingen: Vandenhoeck und Ruprecht, 1993.


Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 12523

The medicinal use of opium in ninth-century Baghdad. (Sir Henry Wellcome Asian Series, vol. 5).

Leiden & London: Brill, 2006.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Iraq, ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE › History of Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Opium
  • 12524

The oriental tradition of Paul of Aegina's Pragmateia.

Leiden: Brill, 2004.

"The volume investigates how Paul of Aegina's medical handbook or pragmateia was transmitted and transformed through Syriac and Arabic translations, becoming one of the cornerstones of the Islamic medical tradition. It uses new manuscript evidence in order to explore the crucial impact of Paul's pragmateia, tracing its steps through different languages and cultures in the Middle East. 
A discussion of different Syriac and Arabic authors who quote the pragmateia such as Ibn Serapion and Rhazes is followed by detailed studies of Greek-Syriac-Arabic translation technique, examining, for instance, ophthalmologic terminology, and giving a critical appraisal of translation syntax and lexicography. Paul's influence on the development of medical theory in the Islamic world and beyond is also addressed...." (publisher).



Subjects: BYZANTINE MEDICINE › History of Byzantine Medicine, ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE › History of Islamic or Arab Medicine
  • 12525

Medicine in Medieval Islam by Emilie Savage-Smith. IN: The Cambridge history of science, Vol. 2: Medieval science, edited by D. Lindberg and M. H. Shank, pp. 140-167.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2014.


Subjects: ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE › History of Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine
  • 12526

Die Natur- und Geheimwissenschaften im Islam.(Handbuch der Orientalistik, 1. Abteilung, Ergänzungsband VI, 2).

Leiden & Cologne: E. J. Brill, 1972.

Concerns zoology, botany, mineralogy, alchemy, astrology, magic, agriculture, the largest section being devoted to alchemy.



Subjects: BOTANY › History of Botany, Chemistry › Alchemy, NATURAL HISTORY › History of Natural History, Zoology / Natural History, Islamic
  • 12527

Economic botany and ethnobotany in Al-Andalus (Iberian Peninsula: Tenth-Fifteenth Centuries), an unknown heritage of mankind.

Economic Botany, 52. 15-26, 1998.


Subjects: BOTANY › History of Botany, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Spain, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines › History of Materia Medica
  • 12528

Encyclopedia of medicine in the Bible and the Talmud.

New York: Jacob Aronson, 2000.

An extension and expansion of Preuss, Biblisch-talmudische Medizin (1911, 1923).  See No. 6498.
 



Subjects: Jews and Medicine, RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 12529

La fleur des remèdes contre le mal des dents.

Paris: Pour l'Autheur et se vendent chez Nicolas Rousset, 1622.

Digital facsimile of the second editiion "reveue corrigée & augmentée de nouveau" also printed in 1622 from BnF Gallica at this link.

Translated into English by Jacques R. Fouré, edited by Milton B. Asbell as The flower of remedies against the toothache. Boston: Dental Classics in Perspective, 1996.



Subjects: DENTISTRY
  • 12530

A sourcebook of dental medicine: Being a documentary history of dentistry and stomatology from the earliest times to the middle of the twentieth century.

Waban, MA: Maro Publications, 2002.


Subjects: DENTISTRY › History of Dentistry
  • 12531

The shape of spectatorship. Art, science, and early cinema in Germany.

New York: Columbia University Press, 2015.

"Focusing on the nontheatrical use of motion picture technology in Germany between the 1890s and World War I....Staging a brilliant collision between the moving image and scientific or medical observation, visual instruction, and aesthetic contemplation, The Shape of Spectatorship showcases early cinema's revolutionary impact on society and culture and the challenges the new medium placed on ways of seeing and learning" (publisher). Chapter 2: "Between observation and spectatorship: Medicine, movies, and mass culture."



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Germany, IMAGING › Cinematography
  • 12532

Medieval bodies: Life, death and art in the Middle Ages.

London: Wellcome Collection, 2018.


Subjects: ART & Medicine & Biology, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine
  • 12533

Lehrbuch der pharmaceutischen Technik.

Braunschweig: Friedrich Vieweg, 1849.

The first textbook of pharmacy.



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACY
  • 12534

Practical pharmacy: The arrangements, apparatus, and manipulations, of the pharmaceutical shop and laboratory.

London: Taylor, Walton & Maberly, 1849.

This was a translation and adaptation for the British market of Mohr's Lehrbuch der pharmaceutischen Technik, also published in 1849. It is thus the first textbook of pharmacy in English.

Though Redwood made it clear in the preface that this was an adapted translation from the German, the publisher appears to have found it expedient to "Anglicize Karl Friedrich Mohr's name to Francis Mohr.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACY
  • 12535

Une version syriaque des aphorismes d'Hippocrate. Texte et traduction par H. Pognon. 2 vols.

Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs, 1903.

Edition of Bibliothèque nationale de France, fonds arabe 6734, a Syriac manuscript copied on 10 October 1205 by a physician, probably a Jacobite or Melchite naned Behnam, but nothing in the codex indicates the author/translator of the Syriaque or Arabic text. Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: Hippocratic Tradition, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Syria and Syriac Texts
  • 12536

Syriac medicine by Grigory Kessel. Pages 438-459 IN: The Syriac world edited by Daniel King.

London & New York: Routledge, 2019.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Syria and Syriac Texts
  • 12537

Mesopotamian eye disease texts: The Nineveh treatise.

Berlin: De Gruyter, 2020.

"This volume is the first complete edition and commentary on Mesopotamian medicine from Nineveh dealing with diseases of the eye. This ancient work, languishing in British Museum archives since the 19th century, is preserved on several large cuneiform manuscripts from the royal library of Ashurbanipal, from the 7th century BC. The longest surviving ancient work on diseased eyes, the text predates by several centuries corresponding Hippocratic treatises. The Nineveh series represents a systematic array of eye symptoms and therapies, also showing commonalities with Egyptian and Greco-Roman medicine. Since scholars of Near Eastern civilizations and ancient and general historians of medicine will need to be familiar with this material, the volume makes this aspect of Babylonian medicine fully accessible to both specialists and non-specialists, with all texts being fully translated into English" (publisher).



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Mesopotamia, OPHTHALMOLOGY › Diseases of the Eye
  • 12538

Mesopotamian medicine and magic. Studies in honor of Markham J. Geller. Edited by Strahil V. Panayotov and Ludek Vacin.

Leiden: Brill, 2018.

 "The [34] contributions concentrate mainly on Mesopotamian scholarly descriptions and practices of diagnosing and healing diverse physical ailments and mental distress. The festschrift contains both critical editions of new texts as well as analytical studies dealing with various issues of Mesopotamian medical and magical lore. Currently, this is the largest edited volume devoted to this topic, significantly contributing to the History of Ancient Sciences" (publisher).



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › History of Ancient Medicine & Biology, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Mesopotamia, Magic & Superstition in Medicine
  • 12539

Blight: The tragedy of Dublin: An exposition in 3 acts.

Dublin: Talbot Press, 1917.

Gogarty, an Irish poet, author, otolaryngologist, athlete, politician, and well-known conversationalist, served as the inspiration for Buck Mulligan in James Joyce's novel Ulysses.

Blight: The Tragedy of Dublin  
was "one of the earliest Irish "slum dramas", it focuses on the horrific conditions prevalent in Dublin's tenements and the ineffectuality of the medical and charitable institutions set up to combat them. The message of the play reflects Gogarty's belief that only a complete overhaul of the Dublin housing system, coupled with a more effective campaign of preventive medicine, were capable of producing positive change" (Wikipedia article on Blight (play) accessed 5-2020).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Ireland, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology › Drama
  • 12540

Islamic medical manuscripts at the National Library of Medicine.

Bethesda, MD: U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2014.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology › Translations to and from Arabic, DIGITAL RESOURCES › Digital Archives & Libraries , ISLAMIC OR ARAB MEDICINE
  • 12541

Medicine and health in New Zealand: A retrospect and a prospect.

Christchurch, NZ: Whitcomb & Tombs, 1940.

Medical education, the hospital system, the relationship between specialists and general practitioners, and the brain drain of doctors to Britain.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › New Zealand
  • 12542

A history of the New Zealand Medical Association: The first 100 years.

Wellington, NZ: Butterworths, 1987.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › New Zealand
  • 12543

Maori health and government policy 1840-1940.

Wellington, NZ: Victoria University Press & Historical Branch, Department of Internal Affairs, 1999.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › New Zealand, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health
  • 12544

Safeguarding the public health: A history of the New Zealand Department of Health.

Wellington, NZ: Victoria University Press & Ministry of Health, Historical Branch, Department of Internal Affairs, 1995.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › New Zealand, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health
  • 12545

A history of the Medical Council of New Zealand. Compiled by Richard Sainsbury.

Wellington, NZ: Medical Council of New Zealand, 2015.

Available only as a PDF from ncnz.org at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › New Zealand
  • 12546

Teens and their doctors: The story of the development of adolescent medicine.

Canton, MA: Science History Publications, 2017.

Traces the development of adolescent medicine from the first program, opened by Ros Gallagher at Boston Children’s Hospital, in 1951, to the creation of the Society for Adolescent Medicine (SAM), in 1968.

The book describes the growth of the specialty in those two decades, including how it was influenced by changes in society, and how practitioners responded to social change with approaches created to care for alienated youth, such as free clinics, mobile medical vans, and teen hotlines. The core of the book is composed of interviews with more than eighty specialists in adolescent medicine, all of whom were trained by the pioneers of the field.



Subjects: Adolescent Medicine, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 12547

The healing landscapes of Central and Southeastern Siberia. Edited by David G. Anderson

Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 2011.

"This volume documents healing traditions in Eastern Siberia in an area extending from Lake Baikal to the Arctic Ocean. The region shows an interesting unity in healing traditions across a wide range of landscape types and culture areas: from the taiga-steppe borderlands influenced by Tibetan and Russian practices in the south, to the north where regional shamanic traditions prevail. There are broad similarities in using unrefined natural materials for healing, as well as in a concern over the 'spiritual' foundations of health, with an accent upon the land as an important dimension. Due to this diversity, this region provides a strong point of comparison to ecologies in other parts of the circumpolar North. The chapters document a blossoming of autonomous healing traditions in post-Soviet Siberia resulting from a social crisis in the aftermath of the collapse of the previous centralized health system. It is a type of 'medical pluralism' marked by a popularity of alternate, non-clinical treatments. But, the sudden upsurge in autonomous cures also speaks to the silent survival of these knowledge traditions in a context where the official medical practice dominated the public sphere for seventy years" (publisher).



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Siberia, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine › Shamanism / Neoshamanism
  • 12548

Idioms of Sámi health and healing. Edited by Barbara Helen Miller.

Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 2015.

"The Sámi—Indigenous people of northernmost Europe—have relied on Traditional Healing methods over generations. This pioneering volume documents, in accessible language, local healing traditions and demonstrates the effectiveness of using the resources local communities can provide. This collection of essays by ten experts also records how ancient healing traditions and modern health-care systems have worked together, and sometimes competed, to provide solutions for local problems" (publisher).



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Norway, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Sweden
  • 12549

Samoan herbal medicine. O Lā'au ma Vai Fofō o Samoa.

Honolulu, HI: University of Hawaii Press, 1995.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › South Pacific, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 12550

Healing practices in the South Pacific. Edited by Claire D. F. Parsons

Honolulu, HI: Institute for Polynesian Studies & Polynesian Cultural Center, 1985.


Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › South Pacific
  • 12551

Samoan medical belief and practice.

Honolulu, HI: University of Hawaii Press, 2006.

"...the first comprehensive study of Samoan medicine. Cluny and La‘avasa Macpherson have carried out intensive investigation into the practice and beliefs of contemporary indigenous healers, or fofo, in Western Samoa ....They explain convincingly why traditional Samoan medicine and its skilled practitioners continue to flourish alongside Western medical practice both in Samoa and in Samoan immigrant communities.The first part of the book gives a history of Samoan indigenous medicine, showing its capacity to adapt to change and to absorb foreign elements. In the second part the authors describe contemporary Samoan practice. They explore the role of the healer in Samoan society and discuss recruitment, training, and specialization. This is followed by a summary of Samoan beliefs about health, illness, and the nature of the human organism; and a detailed account of diagnostic methods and major treatments used" (publisher).



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › South Pacific
  • 12552

Public health in Papua New Guinea: Medical possibility and social constraint, 1884-1984.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1989.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Papua New Guinea, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health
  • 12553

African American midwifery in the South: Dialogues of birth, race, and memory.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998.


Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY › History of African Americans & Medicine & Biology, ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › History of Obstetrics, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › Midwives
  • 12554

Midwives and medical men: A history of inter-professional rivalries and women's rights.

New York: Schocken, 1977.


Subjects: OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › History of Obstetrics, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › Midwives
  • 12555

At work in the field of birth: Midwifery narratives of nature, tradition, and home.

Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University Press, 2008.

",,,  an ethnographic study of midwifery in Canada in the wake of its historic transition from the margins as a grassroots social movement devoted to low-tech, woman-centered care to a regulated profession within the public health care system. In January 1994, after decades of lobbying by midwives and their supporters, the province of Ontario recognized midwifery as a profession for the first time in more than a century.

"Through stories about becoming and being a midwife and stories about receiving midwifery care, this book describes how fundamental tenets of midwifery philosophy and practice--the meaning of tradition, natural birth, and home birth, and the place of medical technology in midwifery--are being reworked by the practical and ideological challenges of midwifery's new place within the formal health care system.



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › History of Obstetrics, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › Midwives
  • 12556

The embryo: Scientific discovery and medical ethics. Edited by Shraga Blazer and Etan Z. Zimmer.

Basel: Karger, 2005.

Addresses 1: The beginning of life, 2: Embryonic stem cells, 3: Societal, ethical and religious views on genetic intervention in humans, 4: Genetics-From in vitro to in vivo, 5: Fetal surgical and pharmacological intervention, 6: Fetal imaging and monitoring, 7: Law and justics, 8: Extreme prematurity



Subjects: EMBRYOLOGY, Ethics, Biomedical, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › Abortion, PHYSIOLOGY › Fetal Physiology
  • 12557

History of medicine in New York: Three centuries of medical progress. 4 vols.

New York: National American Society, 1919.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › New York
  • 12558

Religion and health.

Boston: Little, Brown, 1920.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 12559

Historia de la anestesia en España. 1847-1940.

Madrid: Aran Ediciones, 2005.


Subjects: ANESTHESIA › History of Anesthesia, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Spain
  • 12560

Medicine and conflict: The Spanish Civil War and its traumatic legacy.

London: Routledge, 2018.

Concerns the evolution of medical and surgical care of the wounded during the Spanish Civil War. "Importantly, the focus is from a mainly Spanish perspective – as the Spanish are given a voice in their own story, which has not always been the case. Central to the book is General Franco’s treatment of Muslim combatants, the anarchist contribution to health, and the medicalisation of propaganda – themes that come together in a medico-cultural study of the Spanish Civil War. Suffusing the narrative and the analysis is the traumatic legacy of conflict, an untreated wound that a new generation of Spaniards are struggling to heal." (publisher)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Spain, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine
  • 12561

Cold injury, ground type.

Washington, DC: Office of the Surgeon General, Department of the Army, 1958.

Summary of what was learned about frostbite and trenchfoot encountered by military personel in World War II. Digital facsimile from U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War II, Podiatry
  • 12562

Explorations in Baltic medical history, 1850-2015. Edited by Nils Hansson and Jonatan Wistrand.

Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press, 2019.

"This book explores the history of medicine in the Baltic Sea region and provides different answers to one central question: How has the circulation of knowledge in the Baltic Sea region influenced medicine as a discipline, and illness as an experience, during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? The anthology consists of ten chapters that shed new light on how medical ideas and devices were developed in different contexts. Illuminating currents of traditions, contact zones, and areas of conflict, essays in this collection discuss technological, social, and economic aspects relevant for the exchange of medical knowledge across the Baltic Sea. The contributing authors are historians, physicians, geographers, ethnologists, and scholars of literature" (publisher).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Baltic States, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Lithuania
  • 12563

Medicine, magic and art in early modern Norway.

London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

"This book addresses magical ideas and practices in early modern Norway. It examines a large corpus of Norwegian manuscripts from 1650-1850 commonly called Black Books which contained a mixture of recipes on medicine, magic, and art.

"Ane Ohrvik assesses the Black Books from the vantage point of those who wrote the manuscripts and thus offers an original study of how early modern magical practitioners presented their ideas and saw their practices. The book show how the writers viewed magic and medicine both as practical and sacred art and as knowledge worth protecting through encoding the text. The study of the Black Books illuminates how ordinary people in Norway conceptualized magic as valuable and useful knowledge worth of collecting and saving despite the ongoing witchcraft prosecutions targeting the very same ideas and practices as the books promoted" (publisher).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Norway, Magic & Superstition in Medicine, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine
  • 12564

Amirdovlat Amasiatsi, a Fifteenth-Century Armenian Natural Historian and Physician.

Delmar, NY: Caravan Books, 1999.


Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Biographies of Individuals, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Armenia
  • 12565

Ethnopharmaceutical knowledge in Samogita region of Lithuania: where old traditions overlap with modern medicine.

J. Ethnbiology and Ethnomedicine, 14, article no. 70., 2018.

Open source from link.springer.com at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Ethnobotany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Lithuania, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 12566

Lietuvos Slaugos Istorija 1918-2018.

Vilnius, 2018.

The history of nursing in Lithuania from 1918 to 2018.  (406pp.) Available as a PDF from sskc.lt at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Lithuania, NURSING › History of Nursing
  • 12567

Military medicine in Iraq and Afghanistan: A comprehensive review. Edited by Ian Greaves.

Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2018.

A report from the British Defence Medical Services.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Afghanistan, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Iraq, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Afghanistan
  • 12568

Wars, pestilence and the surgeon's blade: The evolution of British Military medicine and surgery during the nineteenth century.

Solihull, England: Helion & Company, 2013.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Crimean War, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Napoleon's Campaigns & Wars
  • 12569

Hedayat al-Motaallemin fi Tebb. Edited by Jalal Matini.

Mashhad, Iran: University Press, 1965.

First printed edition of the earliest medical work written in the Persian language. Matini based his edition on the 11th century codex Bodleian Library Ms. 37, checking that against the other two known copies of the text. Only three copies are recorded: a codex in the Fateh Library dated 520 AH/1128 CE, a manuscript in the Malek Library, Tehran, and the earliest copy of the three, Bodleian Library Ms. No. 37 dated 478 AH/1085 CE.

"Abu Bakr Rabee Ibn Ahmad Al-Akhawyni Bokhari (Al-Akhawyni Bokhari) (?–983 CE ) was a Persian physician and the author of the Hidayat al-Muta`allemin Fi al-Tibb, [The student's guide to medicine] the oldest document in the history of Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM).[1] He lived during the Golden Age of Iranian-Islamic medicine and his book was used as a reference text for medical students long after his death.[2] Al-Akhawyni Bokhari wrote about anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology signs, symptoms and treatment of the disease of his time. His reputation was based on the treatment of patients with mental illnesses.[3]" (Wikipedia article on Abu Bakr Rabee Ibn Ahmad Al-Akhawyni Bokhari, accessed 5-2020).

T. Nayernour and M.H. Azizi, "History of medicine in Iran: The oldest known medical treatise in the Persian language," Middle East J. Dig. Dis., 3, 74-78. Available from PubMedCentral at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Iran (Persia), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 12570

Safavid surgery.

Oxford & New York: Symposium Publications Division, Pergamon Press, 1966.

The history of surgery during the Safavid dynasty that ruled Persia from 1502 to 1736, and installed Shia rather than Sunni Islam as the state religion.



Subjects: Persian (Iranian) Islamic Medicine › History of Persian (Iranian) Islamic Medicine, SURGERY: General › History of Surgery
  • 12571

A Syriac medical Kunnāšā of Īšōʿ bar ʿAlī (9th c.): First soundings. By Grigory Kessel.

Intellectual History of the Islamicate World, 5, 228-251, 2017.

Abstract:

"A little-known thirteenth-century manuscript preserved in Damascus contains by far the largest Syriac medical work that has survived till today. Despite the missing beginning, a preliminary study of the text allows us to argue that it is the medical handbook (entitled Kunnāšā) of Īšōʿ bar ʿAlī, a ninth-century physician and student of Ḥunayn b. Isḥāq. The seven books of the handbook appear to follow the model of Paul of Aegina’s Pragmateia both in composition and content. The actual significance of the handbook in the history of Syriac and Arabic medicine is yet to be assessed, but there can be no doubt that it will be a pivotal source that illustrates the development of Syriac medicine during a period of four centuries at the moment when it was being translated to lay the foundations of the nascent medical tradition in Arabic."



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Syria and Syriac Texts
  • 12572

Black folk medicine: The therapeutic significance of faith and trust. Edited by Wilbur H. Watson.

Piscataway, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 1998.


Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine
  • 12573

Report of first expedition to South America 1913.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1915.

Strong was the first professor of tropical medicine at Harvard. The Harvard School of Tropical Medicine was founded in 1913, the year they undertook this expedition.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › South America, TROPICAL Medicine , VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 12574

Medical report of the Hamilton Rice Seventh expedition to the Amazon In conjunction with the Department of Tropical Medicine of Harvard University, 1924-1925. By Richard P. Strong, George C. Shattuck, Joseph C. Bequaert, and Ralph E. Wheeler.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1926.

"The Hamilton Rice Seventh Expedition to Amazonia was undertaken [under the leadership of Richard Pearson Strong] partly for general geographical exploration and partly for medical investigation in a section of the Amazon Valley which comprises the greater portion of the most tropical parts of Brazil. The expedition was equipped with complete laboratory apparatus and had further help in various hospitals and clinics, particularly in Mangos and Para. The report of the work is divided into three sections: Part I describes the climate and inhabitants of the country and gives full details about various tropical diseases; Part II discusses the medical and economic entomology of the region; and the third part summarizes briefly the various medical and biological observations made by George Shattuck on the Branco, the Uraricuera, and the Parima Rivers, and adds three other chapters on general biology. A very large number of full-page illustrations and cuts in the text will be of great value to all scientists. Certain sections, intended primarily for workers not especially interested in entomology, have been written with as few technical terms and details as was possible under the circumstances" (publisher)

Contents: The Amazon forest.--The spirochaetal infections.--Chronic inflammatory and nicorative processes of the skin.--Leishmaniasis.--Leprosy.--Malaria.--Splenomegaly.--Trypanosomiasis.--Biastomycosis.--Other parasitic infections of animals.--Pathological conditions produced by arthropoda.--Medical and economic entomology: General remarks. Arachnoidea. Insects.--Observations on the Branco, the Uraricuera and the Parima rivers.--A new mammalian cestode from Brazil.--A dipterous parasite of a snail for Brazil, with an account of the arthropod enemies of mollusks.--Land and fresh-water mollusks obtained during the expedition



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, TROPICAL Medicine , VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 12575

Onchocerciasis: With special reference to the Central American form of the disease. Parts I, II, III, and IV. By Richard P. Strong, J. H. Sandground, J. C. Bequaert, and M. M. Ochoa.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1934.

In depth study of onchcerciasis in Guatemala, where "the disease was of real importance to human beings" at the time. Each of the 4 authors contributed a separate part of the report.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Guatemala, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Black Fly-Borne Diseases › Onchocerciasis (river blindness), OPHTHALMOLOGY › Ophthalmic Parasitology, VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 12576

Bathsheba's Breast: Women, cancer and history.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002.

"Olson, who lost his left hand and forearm to cancer while writing this book, provides an absorbing and often frightening narrative history of breast cancer told through the heroic stories of women who have confronted the disease, from Theodora to Anne of Austria, Louis XIV's mother, who confronted "nun's disease" by perfecting the art of dying well, to Dr. Jerri Nielson, who was dramatically evacuated from the South Pole in 1999 after performing a biopsy on her own breast and self-administering chemotherapy."



Subjects: ONCOLOGY & CANCER › History of Oncology & Cancer
  • 12577

Goulstonian Lectures on the principles of science as applied to military aviation. Lecture I; Lecture II: War flying at high altitudes; Lecture III: War flying and high altitudes, cont.

Lancet, 195, 1147-1151, 1205-1211, 1251-57, 1920.

"Fatigue was the most universal complaint of pilots. Major Birley attributed its occurrence to the bombardment of the senses by the constant stream of stimuli in the air, many of which were of a peculiar character.75 Flyers were observed to stagger from aircraft to make their meticulous reports, which were often a source of conflict as no-one could agree upon what had occurred. Overwhelming tiredness led to frayed tempers and depressed spirits, and the idea uppermost in minds was to lie down and sleep. The repetition of this work over any length of time led to the deterioration of mental and physical wellbeing, inefficiency in the air, and ultimately the shortening of the active service period.76 " (Lynsey Shaw Cobden, "The nervous flyer: Nerves, Flying and the First World War," Br. J. Mil. Hist., 4 (2018) 121-142. 



Subjects: AVIATION Medicine
  • 12578

Into thin air: A history of aviation medicine in the RAF.

London: R. Hale, 1984.


Subjects: AVIATION Medicine › History of Aviation / Aerospace Medicine
  • 12579

Shell shock to PTSD: Military psychiatry from 1900 to the Gulf War.

London: Psychology Press, 2006.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 12580

Geschichte der Dermatologie in Deutschland.

Berlin: Springer, 2013.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Germany, DERMATOLOGY › History of Dermatology
  • 12581

Plague prevention and politics in Manchuria, 1910-1931.

Leiden & Boston: Brill, 1967.

"The Chinese winter of 1910-1911 was one of death and discontent: an epidemic of pneumonic plague—the greatest since the Black Death of the fourteenth century—scourged China's three Eastern Provinces (Manchuria), and famine afflicted the Central Provinces. The Manchurian plague claimed some fifty thousand lives in four months, and the famine took thousands more. Not all the hungry died, but no one sick with plague survived; there were, claimed one source, 43,942 cases and 43,942 deaths. While famine neither affected the foreigners in China nor menaced international frontiers, plague threatened to do both. World powers held privileged positions in a backward China, and some, especially Russia and Japan, feared that the plague would endanger their resident populations, compromise commercial interests, and spread to contiguous national territories. The epidemic also provided Russia and Japan with a potential excuse to take over plague control—and perhaps more—in Chinese territory, incursions the Chinese Government obviously wished to avoid. Thus did mortality and diplomacy confront each other in Manchuria during 1910-1911.

In need of medical help, but needing also to fend off growing political and military pressures, the Imperial Chinese Government at first requested assistance and then called for an International Plague Conference, a step unprecedented in China's history. Richard Pearson Strong became the chief United States delegate to the conference which was held in Manchuria at Mukden in April 1911,3 and his three-month stay in China brought him into prominence" (Chernin, Richard Pearson Strong and the Manchurian epidemic of penumonic plague, 1910-1911, " J. Hist. Med. All. Sci, 44 (1989) 296-319; quote from p. 296).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of, POLITICS, MEDICAL
  • 12582

Report of the International Plague Conference held at Mukden [Shenyang], April, 1911.

Manila, Philippines: Bureau of Printing, 1912.

Report on the epidemic of pneumonic plague that raged in Manchuria and north China during the winter months of 1910-11, causing the death of nearly 50,000 people. This was the first outbreak of epidemic pneumonic plague in modern times.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans)
  • 12583

Dermatología general y clínica iconográfica de enfermedades de la piel ó dermatósis.

Madrid: T. Fortanet, 18711880.

This very large format publication was issued in four parts from 1871 to 1880. It included 168 large plates in the style of Alibert, and was the first major illustrated work on dermatology published in Spain.

Digital facsimile from bdh.bne.es at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Spain, DERMATOLOGY
  • 12584

The works of James McCune Smith: Black intellectual and abolitionist. Edited by John Stauffer. Forward by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

New York: Oxford University Press, 2007.

Smith "was the first African American to hold a medical degree and graduated at the top in his class at the University of Glasgow in Scotland. After his return to the United States, he became the first African American to run a pharmacy in that nation.

"In addition to practicing as a doctor for nearly 20 years at the Colored Orphan Asylum in Manhattan, Smith was a public intellectual: he contributed articles to medical journals, participated in learned societies, and wrote numerous essays and articles drawing from his medical and statistical training. He used his training in medicine and statistics to refute common misconceptions about race, intelligence, medicine, and society in general. Invited as a founding member of the New York Statistics Society in 1852, which promoted a new science, he was elected as a member in 1854 of the recently founded American Geographic Society. But he was never admitted to the American Medical Association or local medical associations" (Wikipedia article on James McCune Smith, accessed 5-2020).



Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY
  • 12585

"Heal the sick" was their motto: The Protestant medical missionaries in China.

Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press, 1990.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 12586

A study of monkey-malaria, and its experimental transmission to man.

Indian med. Gaz., 67, 301-320, 1932.

Das Gupta and his supervisor Robert Knowles first described Plasmodium knowlesi as a distinct species, and as a potential cause of human malaria in 1932 when they described the morphology of the parasite in macaque blood, and demonstrated that it could infect three human patients (in each case it was used to induce fever with the hope of treating another infection).Also in 1932, John Sinton and H. W. Mulligan further described the morphology of the parasite in blood cells, determined it to be a distinct species, and named it Plasmodium knowlesi in honor of Robert Knowles. [3] 
In the mid-20th century, 
P. knowlesi became a popular tool for studying Plasmodium biology, and was used for basic research, vaccine research, and drug development. It is still used as a laboratory model for malaria, as it readily infects the model primate the rhesus macaque, and can be grown in cell culture in human or macaque blood....
Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Malaria, PARASITOLOGY › Plasmodia › P. vivax, P. falciparum, P. malariae, P. ovale, and P. knowlesi
  • 12587

Contested bodies: Pregnancy, childrearing, and slavery in Jamaica.

Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017.

"It is often thought that slaveholders only began to show an interest in female slaves' reproductive health after the British government banned the importation of Africans into its West Indian colonies in 1807. However, as Sasha Turner shows in this illuminating study, for almost thirty years before the slave trade ended, Jamaican slaveholders and doctors adjusted slave women's labor, discipline, and health care to increase birth rates and ensure that infants lived to become adult workers. Although slaves' interests in healthy pregnancies and babies aligned with those of their masters, enslaved mothers, healers, family, and community members distrusted their owners' medicine and benevolence. Turner contends that the social bonds and cultural practices created around reproductive health care and childbirth challenged the economic purposes slaveholders gave to birthing and raising children.

"Through powerful stories that place the reader on the ground in plantation-era Jamaica, Contested Bodies reveals enslaved women's contrasting ideas about maternity and raising children, which put them at odds not only with their owners but sometimes with abolitionists and enslaved men. Turner argues that, as the source of new labor, these women created rituals, customs, and relationships around pregnancy, childbirth, and childrearing that enabled them at times to dictate the nature and pace of their work as well as their value. Drawing on a wide range of sources—including plantation records, abolitionist treatises, legislative documents, slave narratives, runaway advertisements, proslavery literature, and planter correspondence—Contested Bodies yields a fresh account of how the end of the slave trade changed the bodily experiences of those still enslaved in Jamaica:" (publisher).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Caribbean › Jamaica, Slavery and Medicine › History of Slavery & Medicine
  • 12588

The relation between home conditions and the intelligence of school children. From data collected by the late Mrs. Frances Wood. Privy Council. Medical Report Council. Special reports series No. 74.

London: His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1923.


Subjects: DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics, Environmental Science & Health, PEDIATRICS, PSYCHOLOGY › Child
  • 12589

The causes and prevention of miners' nystagmus.

Proc. roy. Soc. B., 85, 10-27, 1912.


Subjects: OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE › Miners' Diseases, OPHTHALMOLOGY › Neuro-ophthalmology
  • 12590

Disibility in industrial Britain: A cultural and literary history of impairment in the coal industry.

Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2020.


Subjects: OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE › History of Occupational Health & Medicine, OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE › Miners' Diseases
  • 12591

De pulsuum scientia libellus utilis & necessarius. Theophili ... de exacta retrimentorum vesicae cognitione, commentariolus, Albano Torino interprete.

Basel: Henricus Petrus, 1533.

First separate, and perhaps the first complete printed edition of the Byzantine physician's De pulsibus, edited by Alban Thorer. This text, in the Galenic tradition "largely mediated through the pseudo-Galenic tract "On pulses, for Antonius" was included in the Articella from the 11th century onward. Perhaps because of that physicians of the Western Middle Ages and Renaissance derived their theory of the pulses from Philaretos's work.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BYZANTINE MEDICINE, CARDIOLOGY › CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY
  • 12592

The medical problems of flying. Including Reports Nos. I-VII of the Air Medical Investigation Committee. Privy Council Medical Research Council.

London: His Majesty's Stationery Office, 1920.


Subjects: AVIATION Medicine
  • 12593

A medical survey of the republic of Guatemala, by George Cheever Shattuck. With the collaboration of Joseph C. Bequaert, Margaret M. Hilferty, Jack H. Sandground [and] Samuel Drury Clark.

Washington, DC: Carnegie Institution of Washington, 1938.

Organized and directed by the Department of Tropical Medicine, Harvard School of Public Health. Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Guatemala, Geography of Disease / Health Geography, TROPICAL Medicine , VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 12594

Die Extrapyramidalen Erkrankungen: Mit Besonderer Berücksichtigung der pathologischen Anatomie und Histologie und der Pathophysiologie der Bewegungsstörungen.

Berlin: Julius Springer, 1923.

Pages 218-245 represent Jakob's full clinical-pathologic description of the fifth patient that he first described in this work.The symptoms of this patient and the histopathopathologic illustrations correspond fully with 21st century understanding of Creutzfeld-Jakob disease.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Prion Diseases, NEUROLOGY › Movement Disorders
  • 12595

The spectrum of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and the virus-induced subacute spongiform encephalopathies. IN: Smith & Cavanagh, editors, Recent advances in neuropathology, Vol. 2., Chapter 6, pp. 129-163.

Edinburgh: Churchill-Livingstone, 1982.

The authors reported a detailed and complete analysis of the original slides of the brain done by Afons Jakob, and provided a partial translation into English, with a detailed analysis of Jakob's clinical description, of the four cases he reported in his paper of 1921, and his fifth case reported in 1923. They concluded, "In summary our review of the original sections used by Jakob establishes several important points which help in the clarification of the nosology of CJD. First, at least two of Jakob's five cases had spogiform encephalopathy which fall within the present day diagnostic criteria. These cases represent the earliest proven examples of subacute spongiform encephalopathy, and justify the retention of Jakob's name in the eponymous designation of the disease." They also stated that "...Creutzfeldt's case remains undiagnosed by modern criteria, but fit best within the acquired toxic-metabolic encephalopathies." Their findings confirmed that Jakob, and not Creutzfeldt, first described what came to be known, incorrectly, as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. 

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Prion Diseases, NEUROLOGY › Degenerative Disorders
  • 12596

A sensory appendage protein protects malaria vectors from pyrethroids.

Nature, 577, 376-380, 2020.

Researching how the malarial mosquito A. gambiae developed resistance to common pyrethroid insecticides, the authors discovered how natural selection had enabled this insect population to develop resistance. They analyzed the gene-expression profiles of insecticide resistant A. gambiae populations from Burkina Faso and Côte d'Ivoire, finding higher than normal expression of genes that encode a family of chemosensory proteins, called sensory appendage proteins (SAPs). This protein specifically binds to pyrethroids that penetrate the moquito's hard exterior when it lands on a bed net (mosquito net), and thus prevents the insecticide from exerting its toxic effect by sequestering it and preventing its action on the mosquito's nervous system by promoting the breakdown of the pyrethrin. The authors also found that the expression of this protein is enhanced in the legs of the mosquito and mostly at the tips where the legs come in contact with the bed net. (Order of authorship in the original paper: Ingham, Anthousi, Douris, et al.)

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Burkina Faso, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Côte d'Ivoire, EVOLUTION, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Malaria
  • 12597

CCR5 deficiency increases risk of symptomatic West Nile infection.

J. exp. Med., 203, 35-40, 2006.

The authors showed that the absence of the CCR5 receptor, which provides immunoresistance to HIV increases susceptability to West Nile virus. (Order of authorship in the original publication: Glass, McDermott, Lim et al.)

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Neuroinfectious Diseases › Encephalitis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › West Nile Virus
  • 12598

Micro-methods of estimating penicillin blood serum and other bodily fluids.

Lancet, 244, 620-621, 1944.

Fleming was the first to measure blood levels of penicillin after intramuscular, intradermal, inravenous and continuous drip administration in order to determine the correct dosage. He described his micro-measurement methods in this paper.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Antibiotics › Penicillin
  • 12599

Penicillin content of blood serum after various doses of penicillin by various routes.

Lancet, 244, 621-624, 1944.

In this paper Fleming and colleagues explained how to choose routes of administration of penicillin as well as dosage, and reproduced the graphs/figures that showed blood levels achieved with different doses and routes of administration.
Fleming was the first to use Procaine mixed with penicillin in order to alleviate the tremendous intramuscular pain of the injections. He showed that the anesthetic did not affect the bacterial killing power of the antibiotic. With M. Y. Young, A. J. E. Rowe.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: ANESTHESIA, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Antibiotics › Penicillin