An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15426 entries, 13280 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 20, 2021

Browse by Entry Number 5300–5399

166 entries
  • 5300

Le kala azar infantile.

Ann. Inst. Pasteur, 23, 361-401, 441-71, 1909.

Nicolle considered infantile kala-azar to be caused by a distinct species of Leishmania; to this he gave the name L. infantum.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Sandfly-Borne Diseases › Leishmaniasis, PEDIATRICS
  • 5300.1

Un cas de kala-azar à Asuncion (Paraguay).

Bull. Soc. Path. exot., 6, 118-20, 1913.

Migone first noted the existence of visceral leishmaniasis in the Americas (Paraguay).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Paraguay, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Sandfly-Borne Diseases › Leishmaniasis, Latin American Medicine
  • 5301

Sobre o tratemento de leishmaniose tegumentar.

Ann. paulist. Med. Cir., 2, 167-69, 1914.

Vianna introduced tartar emetic in the treatment of S. American leishmaniasis. His preliminary announcement on this form of treatment was made to the Brazilian Dermatological Society and appears in Arch. brasil. Med., 1912, 2, 426-28. English translation of earlier paper in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, DERMATOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Sandfly-Borne Diseases › Leishmaniasis
  • 5301.1

On a Herpetomonas found in the gut of the sandfly, Phlebotomus argentipes, fed on kala-azar patients.

Indian med. Gaz., 59, 593-97, 1924.

Demonstration that L. donovani is capable of reproduction in Phlebotomus. With R. O. Smith.



Subjects: INDIA, Practice of Medicine in, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Sandfly-Borne Diseases › Leishmaniasis, PARASITOLOGY
  • 5301.2

The transmission of Leishmania tropica by the bite of Phlebotomus papatasii.

Indian J. med. Res., 29, 803-09, 1941.

Proof of the transmission of L. tropica by P. papatasii.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Sandfly-Borne Diseases › Leishmaniasis
  • 5302

Transmission of Indian kala-azar to man by the bites of Phlebotomus argentipes, Ann. and Brun.

Indian J. med. Res., 30, 473-77, 1942.

Successful transmission of kala-azar to man by the bite of Phlebotomus argentipes reported, showing it to be the vector of Leishmania. With H. E. Shortt and L. A. P. Anderson.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INDIA, Practice of Medicine in, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Sandfly-Borne Diseases › Leishmaniasis
  • 2263.1
  • 5303

Historia naturalis Brasiliae.

Leiden & Amsterdam: apud F. Hackius & L. Elzevirium, 1648.

Piso's study of the natural history of Brazil was also a pioneer work on tropical medicine, and also the largest work from the standpoint of format published by the Elzeviers. The folio includes De medicina brasiliensi by Piso and Historia rerum naturalium brasiliae by the German naturalist and astronomer Georg Marggraf.

Piso was the first to separate yaws from syphilis. The second edition, entitled De lndiae utriusque re naturali et medica libri xiv (Amsterdam, 1658), included additional material by Piso and by de Bondt (see No. 2263). It also included a different version of the frontispiece. See also Nos. 1825. Digital facsimile of a copy of the 1648 edition with a hand-colored frontispiece from the Internet Archive at this link. Digital facsimile of the 1658 edition from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Botanical Illustration, BOTANY › Ethnobotany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Treponematoses, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Treponematoses › Yaws, NATURAL HISTORY, TROPICAL Medicine , ZOOLOGY, ZOOLOGY › Illustration
  • 5304

Essay on the natural history of Guiana, in South America. Containing a description of many curious productions in the animal and vegetable systems of that country. Together with an account of the religion, manners, and customs of several tribes of its Indian inhabitants. Interspersed with a variety of literary and medical observations. In several letters....

London: T. Becket, 1769.

Bancroft was an English physician who lived for many years in South America. He noted the transmission of yaws by flies (p. 385 of his book). Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Guyana, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Latin America, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Treponematoses › Yaws, Latin American Medicine, NATURAL HISTORY, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 5306

On the presence of spirochaetes in two cases of ulcerated parangi (yaws).

Brit med. J., 2, 1280, 1330-31, 1430, 1905.

Castellani demonstrated in scrapings of yaws tissue a spirochaete, T. pertenue, later found to be the causal organism. He thus finally established it as a distinct organism from the syphilis spirochaete. Preliminary note in J. Ceylon. Br. Brit. med. Ass., 1905, 2, pt. 1, 54.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Treponema , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Treponematoses › Yaws
  • 5307

On a spirochaete found in yaws papules.

J. trop. Med. Hyg., 8, 345, 1905.

Independently of Castellani (No. 5306) Wellmann discovered Treponema pertenue.

"In addition to being an author, Wellman was also a doctor of tropical medicine, scientist, administrator, artist, educator, spy, and engineer. Writing under the pen names Cyril Kay-Scott and Richard Irving Carson, Wellman composed plays, novels, short stories, and poems, all of which are represented in the collection. In addition, there is correspondence, exhibition catalogs, Wellman's autobiography, and a watercolor by Wellman. Already on his second marriage and with four children, Wellman eloped with writer Elsie Dunn (1893-1963). They fled the country and changed their names to Cyril Kay-Scott and Evelyn Scott. After living in Brazil and later returning to the United States, Wellman had a career as an art teacher, a museum director, and upon retiring, wrote his autobiography (https://specialcollections.tulane.edu/archon/?p=collections/controlcard&id=607, accessed 03-2018).



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Treponema , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Treponematoses › Yaws
  • 5308

Experimental yaws in the monkey and rabbit.

J. exp. Med., 12, 616-22; 14, 196-216, 1910, 1911.

A monkey was first infected and from it the infection was transmitted to a rabbit.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Treponematoses › Yaws
  • 5308.1

Demonstratión de un treponema en el borde activo un caso de pinto de las manos y pies y en la linfa de ganglios superficiales (reporte preliminar).

Arch. Med. interna, 4, 112-17, 1938.

B. Saenz, J. Grau Triana, and J. Alfonso Armenteros indicated that pinta is caused by a treponeme, T. carateum.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Treponema , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Cuba, DERMATOLOGY › Specific Dermatoses › Pinta, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Treponematoses
  • 5308.2

On the origin of the human treponematoses (pinta, yaws, endemic syphilis and venereal syphilis).

Bull. Wld. Hlth. Org., 29, 7-41, 1963.

“Perhaps the most scholarly investigation of the origin of syphilis” (Wesley Spink).



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY › Specific Dermatoses, DERMATOLOGY › Specific Dermatoses › Pinta, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Syphilis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Treponematoses › Yaws, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 5308.3

Bibliography of yaws, 1905-62.

Geneva: World Health Organization, 1963.

Over 1,700 items.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Diseases, Global Health, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Treponematoses › Yaws
  • 1772
  • 5309

A chronological history of the weather and seasons and of the prevailing diseases in Dublin. With their various periods, successions, and revolutions, during the space of forty years. With a comparative view of the difference of the Irish climate and diseases, and those of England and other countries ...

London: Robinson & Roberts, 1770.

Rutty kept continuous records of weather and diseases in Dublin from 1724-64. On page 75 of this work is the first clear description of relapsing fever. Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: Bioclimatology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Ireland, INFECTIOUS DISEASE, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever
  • 5310

Natural history, pathology and treatment of the epidemic fever at present prevailing in Edinburgh and other towns.

London: John Churchill, 1843.

The epidemic of relapsing fever in Edinburgh in 1843 was well described by Cormack. He was first editor of the Association Medical Journal which later became the British Medical Journal.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever
  • 5311

Notice of a febrile disorder which has prevailed at Edinburgh during the summer of 1843.

Edinb. med. surg. J., 60, 410-18, Edinburgh, 1843.

Relapsing fever was given its name by Craigie, in his description of the Edinburgh epidemic.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever
  • 5311.1

On some of the characters which distinguish the fever at present epidemic from typhus fever.

Edinb. med. surg. J., 61, 201-25, 1844.

Henderson, professor of pathology at Edinburgh, gave a good account of relapsing fever seen during the epidemic in 1843. He was one of the first to differentiate it from typhus.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5312

Fièvre à rechutes. (Thesis.)

Paris, 1869.

Silliau gave a good account of the epidemic of relapsing fever at Réunion, 1865. He showed the contagious nature of the disease.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever
  • 5313

Observations on relapsing fever, as it occurred in Philadelphia in the winter of 1869 and 1870.

Amer. J. med. Sci., n.s. 60., 336-58, 1870.

Parry called attention to infection from articles of clothing worn by victims of the epidemic of relapsing fever in Philadelphia in 1869.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever
  • 5314

Vorkommen feinster, eine Eigenbewegung zeigender Fäden im Blute von Recurrenskranken.

Zbl. med. Wiss., 11, 145-47, 1873.

Discovery (in 1868) of Borrelia recurrentis, causative agent in relapsing fever.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes, BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Borrelia , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever
  • 5315

Materialien zur Pathologie und Therapie des Rückfallstyphus.

Dtsch. Arch. klin. Med., 24, 80-97, 1879.

By inoculating healthy subjects with blood of patients suffering from replapsing fever, and producing the fever in the former, Mochutkovski demonstrated not only the communicability of the disease but also the specific pathogenic significance of the spirochaete.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever
  • 5316

Spirillum fever.

London: J.& A. Churchill, 1882.

Asiatic relapsing fever; original work on this disease by Carter is remembered by the eponym “Carter’s fever” and the name Borrelia carteri. He reproduced the disease in the monkey.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever
  • 5317

“Tick fever”.

Brit. med. J., 2, 1453-54, 1904.

Ross and Milne discovered the causative agent in the African variety of relapsing (tick) fever.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases
  • 5318

The nature of tick fever in the eastern part of the Congo Free State.

Brit. med. J., 2, 1259-60, 1905.

Independently of Ross and Milne, Dutton and Todd demonstrated relapsing fever in monkeys conveyed by infected ticks, Omithodorus moubata. The organism was named Sp. (now Borrelia) duttoni. Both Dutton and Todd contracted the disease, and the former died of it before the paper was published.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Borrelia , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Congo, Democratic Republic of the, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 5319

Study of a spirochete obtained from a case of relapsing fever in man, with notes on morphology, animal reactions, and attempts at cultivation.

J. infect. Dis., 3, 266-90, 1906.

Spirochaete causing the American variety of relapsing fever first isolated. With A. W. Pappenheimer and T. Flournoy.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever
  • 5320

Studies in Spirillum obermeieri and related organisms.

J. infect. Dis., 3, 291-393, 1906.

Novy and Knapp made important observations on the spirochaete isolated by Norris et al. from a case of (American) relapsing fever, proving it to be different from Borrelia obermeieri, sometimes referred to as “Novy’s bacillus”, Borrelia novyi. The above paper includes work on the immunology of the disease.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Borrelia , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever
  • 5321

The part played by Pediculus corporis in the transmission of relapsing fever.

Brit. med. J., 2, 1706-09, 1907.

Proof that relapsing fever is conveyed by the body louse, Pediculus corporis.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Relapsing Fever
  • 5322

Violent symptoms from the bite of a rat.

Amer. J. med. Sci., 26, 245-46, 1840.

First report of rat-bite fever to appear in a medical journal.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rat-Bite Fever
  • 5323

Note on the occurrence of a minute blood-spirillum in an Indian rat.

Sci. Mem. med. Off. Army India, (1887), 3, 45-48, 1888.

Demonstration of Spirillum minus, later shown to be a cause of rat-bite fever. (See also No. 5327).



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rat-Bite Fever
  • 5324

Salvarsantherapie der Rattenbisskrankheit in Japan.

Münch. med. Wschr., 59, 854-57, 1912.

Salvarsan first used in the treatment of rat-bite fever.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Japan, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rat-Bite Fever, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Chemotherapeutic Agents › Arsphenamine
  • 5325

Zurt Aetiologie und Klinik der Bisskrankheit.

Derm. Wschr., 58, Suppl., 77-103, 1914.

Isolation of Streptothrix (Actinomyces) muris ratti from human patients bitten by rats.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Actinomyces, DERMATOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rat-Bite Fever
  • 5326

The cause of rat-bite fever.

J. exp. Med., 23, 249-50; 25, 33-44, 1916, 1917.

K. Futaki, I. Takaki, T. Taniguchi, and S. Osumi found a spirillum (Sp. morsus muris) in the lymphatic glands and blood stream in cases of rat-bite fever (sodoku).



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Spirillium, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rat-Bite Fever
  • 5327

Observations on the causal organism of rat-bite fever in man.

Ann. trop. Med. Parasit.,16, 157-75, 1924.

Robertson proved one of the causal organisms of rat-bite fever to be Sp. morsus muris. He re-named it Spirillum minus Carter, 1887, identifying it as the first spiral micro-organism to be described from a rodent.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Spirillium, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rat-Bite Fever
  • 5328

Erythema arthriticum epidemicum; preliminary report.

Boston med. surg. J., 194, 285-87, 1926.

“Haverhill fever” first reported. The writers isolated an organism, later found to be identical with Streptothrix muris ratti and Streptobacillus moniliformis. With L. E. Sutton and O. Willner.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Streptococcus , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rat-Bite Fever
  • 5329

Sur une nouvelle fièvre par morsure de rat.

Bull. Acad. Méd. (Paris), 3 sér., 117, 705-13, 1937.

A. Lemierre, J. Reilly, A. Laporte, and M. Morin isolated Streptobacillus moniliformis from a case of rat-bite fever.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Streptococcus , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Animal Bite Wound Infections › Rat-Bite Fever
  • 5097
  • 5330

Report on fever (Malta).

Army med. Dept, statist. Rep. (Lond.), (1861), 3, 486-521, 1863.

Marston wrote the first description of Malta fever as a distinct disease. He contracted the disease while serving in the Mediterranean area and described his own case.

Marston was apparently the first to describe “Weil’s disease” (p. 513).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Malta, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Brucellosis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leptospiroses
  • 5331

Fièvre bilieuse ou hépatique.

Gaz. Hôp. (Paris), 56, 809-10, 913-14, 1883.

An early account of “Weil’s disease”, Leptospirosis icterohaemorrhagica.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leptospiroses
  • 5332

Ueber eine eigenthümliche, mit Milztumor, Icterus und Nephritis einhergehende, acute Infectionskrankheit.

Dtsch. Arch. klin. Med., 39, 209-32, 1886.

In his classic description of Leptospirosis icterohaemorrhagica Weil differentiated the disease from other types of acute jaundice. It is better known as “Weil’s disease”.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leptospiroses
  • 5333

Note on an organism found in yellow-fever tissue.

Publ. Hlth. Rep. (Wash.), 22, 541, 1907.

Stimson discovered a spirochete in the organs of persons dying of (?) yellow fever. He called it Sp. interrogans, but it was almost certainly Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Leptospira, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leptospiroses, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever
  • 5334

The etiology, mode of infection, and specific therapy of Weil’s disease (Spirochaetosis icterohaemorrhagica)

J. exp. Med., 23, 377-402, 1916.

Inada, Y. Ido, R. Hoki, R. Kaneko, and H. Ito proved that Sp. (Leptospira) icterohaemorrhagiae is the causal organism in Weil’s disease (Leptospirosis). Preliminary report (in Japanese) in Tokyo Ijishinshi, 1915, No. 1908.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Leptospira, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leptospiroses
  • 5334.1

The rat as a carrier of Spirochaeta icterohaemorrhagiae, the causative agent in Weil’s disease (spirochaetosis icterohaemorrhagica)

J. exp. Med., 26, 341-53, 1917.

Rats shown to be the carriers of Leptospira. With R. Hoki, H. Ito, and H. Wani.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Leptospira, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leptospiroses
  • 5334.2

Spirochaeta hebdomadis, the causative agent of seven-day fever (nanukayami)

J. exp. Med., 28, 435-48, 1918.

Discovery of Leptospira hebdomadis, carried by a mouse. With H. Ito and H. Wani.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Leptospira, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leptospiroses
  • 5335

Het voorkomen van een afwijkend Leptospira-ras in Nederland.

Ned. T. Geneesk., 77, 4271-76, 1933.

Leptospira canicola first isolated (1913) from the urine of a dog.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Leptospira, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leptospiroses, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5335.1

Ueber die Prophylaxe der Spirochaetosis icterohaemorrhagica Inada (Weilschen Krankheit) durch Schutzimpfung.

Z. ImmunForsch., 79, 1-26, 1933.

Prophylactic vaccination against leptospirosis.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Leptospira, IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leptospiroses
  • 5336

De leptospiroses bij den hond, en de beteekenis der Leptospira canicola.

Ned. T. Geneesk., 78, 5197-209, 1934.

First reported cases of human infection with L. canicola. With A. Klarenbeek, W. A. P. Schüffner, and J. Voet.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Leptospira, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leptospiroses, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5336.1

Exercitatio de vena Medinensi, ad mentem Ebn Sinae [Ibn Sina] sive de dracunaculis veterum. Specimen exhibens novae versionis ex Arabico, cum commentario uberiori. Cui accedit altera, de vermiculis capillaribus infantium.

Augsburg: Theophil Goebel, 1674.

An exhaustive survey of dracontiasis, or guinea worm disease, based on the Arabic writings of Avicenna. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Guinea Worm Disease (Dracunculiasis), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms, PEDIATRICS
  • 5336.2

Sur un ver trouvé sous la conjunctive, à Maribou, isle Saint-Domingue.

J. Méd Chir. Pharm., 32, 338-39, 1770.

First description of the worm Loa loa. Mongin was a French surgeon working in the West Indies. English translation in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Caribbean, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Deer Fly (Mango Fly)-Borne Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Deer Fly (Mango Fly)-Borne Diseases › Loiasis (African Eye Worm) Disease, OPHTHALMOLOGY › Ophthalmic Parasitology, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms
  • 5336.3

An essay on the malignant pestilential fever introduced into the West Indian Islands from Boullam, on the coast of Guinea, as it appeared in 1793 and 1794.

London: C. Dilly, 1795.

Chisholm, "Surgeon to his Majesty's Ordnance in Grenada," was apparently the first to observe the mode of transmission of the Guinea worm, Dracunculus medinensis. Chishom was also one of the first to recognize that the yellow fever epidemic of 1793-1794 was caused by some factor brought to the western hemisphere by the Hankey, a ship that had sailed from the west coast of Africa. However, like the rest of his medical peers, Chisholm did not understand that mosquitoes were vectors of the disease. Digital facsimile of the 1795 edition from the Internet Archive at this link. 

In 1801 Chisholm, by then "Inspector-General of the Ordnance Medical Department in the West Indies," issued from London a greatly expanded second edition in two volumes as: An essay on the malignant pestilential fever introduced into the West Indian islands from Boullam, on the coast of Guinea, as it appeared in 1793, 1794, 1795, and 1796. Interspersed with observations and facts, tending to prove that the epidemic existing at Philadelphia, New-York, &c. was the same fever introduced by infection imported from the West India Islands: And illustrated by evidences founded on the state of those islands, and the information of the most eminent practiioners residing on them. 

Digital facsimile of the second edition from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Africa, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Caribbean, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Guinea, Republic of, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Guinea Worm Disease (Dracunculiasis), INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms
  • 5336.4

Notiz. a. d. Geb. d. Natur-u. Heilk., Weimar, 1, col. 64, 1821.

Description of the calcified cysts of trichinosis in human muscle. (A brief notice with no title).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases › Trichinosis, PARASITOLOGY › Trichinella
  • 5336.5

Notes of a peculiar appearance observed in human muscle, probably depending upon the formation of very small cysticerci.

Lond. med. Gaz., 11, 605, 1833.

Hilton described Trichinella spiralis and suggested its parasitic nature.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases › Trichinosis
  • 5337

Description of a microscopic entozoon infesting the muscles of the human body.

Lond. med. Gaz., 16, 125-127; Trans. zool. Soc. Lond., 1, 315-24, 1835.

While a first-year student at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, James Paget discovered trichina in muscle during dissection. Richard Owen, his teacher, named it Trichina spiralis and published an account, barely mentioning Paget. It was renamed Trichinella spiralis in 1896. Paget communicated his discovery to the Abernethian Society at St. Bartholomew’s on 6 Feb, 1835; an abstract of his paper is published in the Transactions of the society, vol. 2. Paget recorded the chronology of the discovery in a letter to the Lancet, 1866, 1, 269. This and his unpublished article intended for Lond. med. Gaz., 1835, is reproduced by Kean (No. 2268.1), p. 458-62. The letter is also published in Bull. Hist. Med., 1979, 53, 547.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases › Trichinosis, PARASITOLOGY › Trichinella
  • 5338

Entozoon in the superficial part of the extensor muscles of the thigh of the hog. Abstract

Proc. Acad. nat. Sci. Phila., 3, 107-8, 1846.

First description of trichinosis in the pig.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases › Trichinosis, PARASITOLOGY › Trichinella
  • 5338.1

Beobachtungen über Trichina spiralis in Betriff der Uebertragung der Eingeweidewürmer.

Nachrichten Georg-August Univ. Königl. Wiss. Göttingen, 260-64; 183-204, Göttingen, 1851, 1852.

Herbst was the first to demonstrate that an animal eating trichinous flesh would thereby develop trichinae in its own muscles. English translation of part I in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases › Trichinosis
  • 5339

Ein Beitrag zur Helminthographia humana aus brieflichen Mittheilungen des Dr. Bilharz in Cairo, nebst Bemerkungen von C. T. v. Siebold.

Z. wiss. Zool., 4, 53-76, 1852.

Discovery, in 1851, of Schistosoma haematobium, the parasite of bilharziasis. Bilharz was Professor of Zoology at Cairo. English translation in Rev. infect. Dis., 1984, 4, 727-32, and in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Egypt, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths
  • 5340

Ueber die Band-und Blasenwürmer.

Leipzig: Wilhelm Engelmann, 1854.

Siebold succeeded in infecting dogs with Taenia echinococcus. Translation by T. H. Huxley Sydenham Society London, 1857.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES
  • 5341

Die in und an dem Körper des lebenden Menschen vorkommenden Parasiten. Ein Lehr- und Handbuch der Diagnose und Behandlung der thierischen und pflanzlichen Parasiten des Menschen. Zum Gebrauche für Studirende der Medicin und der Naturwissenschaften, für Lehrer der Zoologie, Botanik, Physiologie, pathologischen Anatomie und für praktische Ärzte. 2 vols.

Leipzig: B. G. Teubner, 1855.

English translation of 2nd ed. by Edwin Ray Lankester as On animal and vegetable parasites of the human body: A manual of their natural history, diagnosis, and treatment. 2 vols. London: Sydenham Society, 1857. Digital facsimile of the 1855 edition from Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link, of the English translation at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PARASITOLOGY
  • 5342

Ueber die Trichinen-Krankheit des Menschen.

Virchows Arch. path. Anat., 18, 561-72, 1860.

The intestinal and muscular forms of trichinosis were first noted by Zenker, who established their connection with the disease. English translation in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases › Trichinosis, PARASITOLOGY › Trichinella
  • 5343

Untersuchungen über Trichina spiralis.

Leipzig: C. F. Winter, 1860.

Leuckart provided an articulate and detailed description of Trichinella spiralis.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases › Trichinosis
  • 2453
  • 5344

Die menschlichen Parasiten und die von ihnen herrührenden Krankheiten. 2 vols.

Leipzig: C. F. Winter, 18621876.

Includes the first complete and accurate account of the life history and morphology of Taenia echinococcus. Leuckart proved the relationship between hydatid cysts and minute tape-worms in dogs. English translation, Edinburgh, 1886. Digital facsimile of the German edition from Google Books at this link; facsimile of the English translation at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms
  • 5344.1

Ein Beitrag zur Pathologie der Trichinenkrankheit beim Menschen.

Virchows Arch. path. Anat., 25, 399-413, 1862.

First confirmed diagnosis of trichinosis in a living person.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases › Trichinosis
  • 5344.10

On the presence of a Filaria in “craw-craw”.

Lancet, 1, 265-66, 1875.

In 1874, while examining skin snips from craw-craw patients in Ghana, during his service on the H. M. S. Decoy, the Irish surgeon O’Neill discovered the subcutaneous microfilaria. This was the earliest known visual identification of the O. volvulus parasite, fifty years before the worm was linked with blindness (onchocerciasis). In May 2015 O'Neill's paper could be read at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Ghana, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Black Fly-Borne Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Black Fly-Borne Diseases › Onchocerciasis (river blindness), OPHTHALMOLOGY › Ophthalmic Parasitology, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms › Filaria
  • 5344.11

Sur la maladie dite diarrhée de Cochinchine.

C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris), 83, 316-18, 1876.

Normond found Strongyloides stercoralis, the causal parasite in strongyloidiasis. English translation in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Vietnam, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PARASITOLOGY
  • 5344.2

On the structure and nature of the Dracunculus or Guinea worm.

Trans. Linn. Soc., 24, 101-34, 1863.

First detailed description.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Guinea Worm Disease (Dracunculiasis), PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms, ZOOLOGY › Helminthology
  • 5344.3

Note sur une tumeur des bourses contenant un liquide laiteux (galactocèle de Vidal) et renfermant de petits êtres vermiformes que l’on peut considérer comme les helminthes hèmatoïdes à l’étatd’embryon.

Gaz. méd. Paris, 33, 665-67, 1863.

Description of the embryonic stage of Wuchereria bancrofti in hydrocele fluid.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Lymphatic Filariasis (Elephantiasis), PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms › Filaria
  • 5344.4

Entozoa.

London: Groombridge & Sons, 1864.

Cobbold suggested (p. 36) that a mollusc was the intermediate host in bilharziasis.



Subjects: BIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis), ZOOLOGY › Helminthology
  • 5344.5

On the endemic haematuria of the Cape of Good Hope.

Med.-chir. Trans., 47, 55-74, 1864.

Like Cobbold, Harley expressed the view that a mollusc was the intermediate host in bilharziasis.



Subjects: BIOLOGY, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › South Africa, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis)
  • 5344.6

Noticiar preliminar sobre vermes de uma especie ainda nao descripta, encontrados na urina de doentes de hematuria intertropical no Brazil.

Gaz. med. Bahia, 3, 97-99, 1868.

In 1866 Wucherer saw the embryo form of the filaria worm. Later the name Wuchereria bancrofti was applied to it. English translation in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Lymphatic Filariasis (Elephantiasis), PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms › Filaria
  • 5344.7

On the structure and reproduction of Filaria medinensis L.

Izvest. imp. Obsh. Liub. Estes. (Mosk.), 8, 71-82, 18691870.

Fedchenko, a Russian naturalist and explorer of central Asia, elucidated the life cycle of Dracunculus medinensis, the parasite of dracontiasis. English translation in Amer. J. Med., 1971, 20, 511-23, and in Kean (No. 2268.1) pp. 426-34.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Russia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Guinea Worm Disease (Dracunculiasis), PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms › Filaria
  • 5344.8

On a haemotozoon inhabiting human blood. Its relation to chyluria and other diseases.

Ann. Rep. sanit. Comm. India (1871), 8, Appendix E 241-60, 1871.

Independently of Demarquay (No. 5344.3) and Wucherer (No. 5344.6), Lewis found microfilariae in the urine and blood in chyluria. He was first to use the term Filaria sanguinis hominis for the parasite.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms › Filaria
  • 5344.9

Remarks on the anatomy and pathological relations of a new species of liver fluke.

Lancet, 2, 271-74, 1875.

First complete description of Chlonorchis sinensis.



Subjects: HEPATOLOGY › Diseases of the Liver, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Liver Flukes
  • 5345

Filaria sanguinis hominis.

Med. Rep. Imperial Maritime Customs, China, 13th issue, 30-38, 1877.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms › Filaria
  • 5345.1

Further observations on Filaria sanguinis hominis.

Med. Rep. Imperial Maritime Customs, China, (1878), Special series No. 2, 14th issue, 1-26, 1877.

Manson showed that Wuchereria bancrofti, the cause of filarial elephantiasis in man, develops in, and is transmitted by, the Culex mosquito. This was the first proof that infective diseases are spread by animal vectors. See also his later paper in J. Linnean Soc., 1878 (Zool.), 14, 304-11.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Lymphatic Filariasis (Elephantiasis), PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms › Filaria
  • 5346

Cases of filarious disease.

Trans. path. Soc. Lond., 29, 406-19, 1878.

Discovery (1876) of Wuchereria bancrofti. Bancroft’s first report on this was in the form of a letter to T. S. Cobbold, who published it in Lancet, 1877, 2, 70-71.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms › Filaria
  • 5346.1

Ueber parasitäre Hämoptoë (Gregarinosis pulmonum).

Zbl. med. Wiss., 18, 721-22, 1880.

Description of the ova of Paragonimus (which Baelz named Gregarina pulmonalis) and its relationship to endemic hemoptysis. Translation in Kean (No. 2268.1), p. 602.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PARASITOLOGY
  • 5346.2

Distoma ringeri.

Med. Rep. Imperial Maritime Customs, China, Special series No. 2, 20th issue, pp. 10-12, 1880.

Manson made a fundamental contribution to knowledge on paragonimiasis with his description of its etiology and of the parasite. He named it Distoma ringeri after Dr. Ringer, who recovered it from the lung at necropsy; it was later named Paragonimus ringeri. Reproduced in Kean (No. 2268.1), p. 603.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PARASITOLOGY
  • 5346.3

The metamorphosis of Filaria sanguinis hominis in the mosquito.

Trans. Linn. Soc. Lond., Zool., 2, 367-88, 1884.

Manson reported that the changes he had observed in ingested filariae took place in the mosquito thorax, not in the stomach as previously thought.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms › Filaria
  • 5347

Notes upon the experimental breeding of Taenia echinococcus in the dog from the echinococci of man.

Proc. roy. Soc. Lond., 38, 449-57, 1885.

Thomas succeeded in transmitting Taenia echinococcus to the dog from human sources.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5347.1

Case of Filaria loa in which the parasite was removed from under the conjunctiva.

Trans. ophthal. Soc. U.K., 15, 137-67, 1895.

First detailed description of Loa loa. See also Trans. ophthal. Soc. U.K., 1897, 17, 227-32.

Robertson first briefly mentioned this procedure and the Loa Loa worm in a brief article written for him by the editor of Lancet, entitled "Filaria loa - Tuberculous keratitis - Equatorial rupture of the chorid - Cataract", Lancet, October 27, Vol. 2 for 1894, 977-978. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for the 1894 reference.)

 



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Deer Fly (Mango Fly)-Borne Diseases › Loiasis (African Eye Worm) Disease, OPHTHALMOLOGY › Ophthalmic Parasitology, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Parasitic Worms › Filaria
  • 5348

Studies on trichinosis, with especial reference to the increase of the eosinophilic cells in the blood and muscle, the origin of these cells and their diagnostic importance.

J. exp. Med., 3, 315-47, 1898.

Brown pointed out the occurrence of eosinophilia in trichinosis. A preliminary communication upon the subject, by W. S. Thayer, was published in C. R. XII Congr. int. Med., Moscou, 1897, 126-31.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases › Trichinosis, PARASITOLOGY › Trichinella
  • 5349

A recent observation on Filaria nocturna in Culex. probable mode of infection of man.

Brit. med. J., 1, 1456-57, 1900.

Demonstration of the complete chain of filarial infection from man-to-mosquito-to-man.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES
  • 5349.1

The aetiology of a parasitic disease (in Japanese)

Ijo Shimbun, No. 669, 1325-32, 1904.

First description of Schistosoma japonicum. Translation in Kean (No. 2368.1), p. 518.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Japan, HEPATOLOGY › Diseases of the Liver, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis)
  • 5349.2

Note on a new form of liver cirrhosis due to the presence of the ova of Bilharzia haematobia.

J. Path. Bact., 9, 237-39, 1904.

“Symmers’s fibrosis”, pipe stem fibrosis of the liver, occurring in cases of certain forms of schistosomiasis.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis)
  • 5350

Recherches sur un séro-diagnostic du kyste hydatique par la méthode des précipitines.

C. R. Soc. Biol. (Paris), 62, 1198-1201, 1907.

Precipitin reaction for the diagnosis of hydatid disease.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES
  • 5350.1

Ueber den Wohnort von Schistosomum japonicum. [Japanese text.]

Kyoto Igaku Zassi, 4, No. 4, 1907.

Fujinami and Nakamura identified the intermediate host of S. japonicum. Abstract in Arch. Schiffs-u. Tropenhyg., 1908, 12,471. Later (1909, 6, 224-52) they demonstrated that infection occurred by skin penetration. English translation of 1909 paper in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Japan, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis), PARASITOLOGY
  • 5350.2

Der Zwischenwirt des Schistosomum japonicum Katsurada.

Mitt. med. Fak. Univ. Kyushu, 1, 187-97, 1914.

Miyairi and Suzuki confirmed that snails are the intermediate hosts of S. japonicum, and their paper completed the description of the life cycle from ova to snail intermediate host. Translation in Kean (No. 2268.1), p. 532.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Japan, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis)
  • 5350.3

Report of the Bombay Bacteriological laboratory for the year 1913.

Bombay: Government Central Press, 1914.

Experimental demonstration, on pp. 14-16, of the complete life cycle of Dracunculus medinensis. This parasitic infection is called Dracunculiasis or Guinea-worm disease.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Guinea Worm Disease (Dracunculiasis)
  • 5350.4

Reports of the results of the bilharzia mission in Egypt, 1915.

J. roy. Army med. Cps, 25, 1-55, 147-92, 253-67; 27, 171-90; 30, 235-60, 19151916, 1918.

Leiper identified the snail responsible for the transmission of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Egypt, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis)
  • 5350.5

Observations on the spread of Asiatic schistosomiasis.

Brit. med. J., 1, 201-03, 1915.

First paper in English giving a detailed account of the development of S. japonicum in the snail and its subsequent development in man. Atkinson, a surgeon in the Royal Navy, was a member of Scott’s Antarctic expedition. He was in command of the expedition's base at Cape Evans for much of 1912, and led the party which found the tent containing the bodies of Scott, "Birdie" Bowers and Edward Wilson. Atkinson was subsequently associated with two controversies: that relating to Scott's orders concerning the use of dogs, and that relating to the possible incidence of scurvy in the polar party. 



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis)
  • 5350.6

The successful use of antimony in bilharziosis.

Lancet, 2, 325-27, 1918.

Introduction of tartar emetic (antimony) in the treatment of schistosomiasis.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis)
  • 5350.7

On the life cycle of Fasciolopsis buski Lankester.

Kitasato Arch. exp. Med., 4, 159-67, 1921.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Japan, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES
  • 5350.8

The insect transmission of Onchocerca volvulus (Leuckart, 1893), the cause of worm nodules in man in Africa.

Brit. med. J., 1, 129-33, 1927.

The fly Simulium damnosum shown to be the vector of onchocerciasis.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Africa, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Black Fly-Borne Diseases › Onchocerciasis (river blindness), OPHTHALMOLOGY › Ophthalmic Parasitology
  • 5351

Hydatid disease. Its pathology, diagnosis and treatment.

Sydney: Australasian Med. Publ. Co, 1928.

Dew’s book remains the authoritative source. His many contributions to the knowledge of hydatid disease are summarized in it.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Australia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PARASITOLOGY, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5351.1

Precipitin and skin tests as aids in diagnosing trichinosis.

Parasitology, 24, 60-86, 1932.

Intradermal test for trichinosis.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases › Trichinosis, Laboratory Medicine › Diagnostic Skin Tests, PARASITOLOGY › Trichinella
  • 5351.2

Miracil, ein neues Chemotherapeuticum gegen die Darmbilharziose.

Naturwissenschaften, 33, 253 (only), 1946.

Lucanthone hydrochloride (Miracil D). With R. Gönnert and H. Mauss.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES
  • 5351.3

Experimental chemotherapy of filariasis. III. Effect of 1-diethylcarbamyl-4-methyl-piperazine hydrochloride against naturally acquired filarial infections in cotton rats and dogs.

J. Lab. clin. Med., 32, 1314-29, 1947.

Proof of antifilarial action of diethylcarbarmazine citrate (hetrazan). With S. Kushner, H. W. Stewart, E. White, W. S. Wallace, and Y. Subbarow.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PHARMACOLOGY › Chemotherapy
  • 5351.4

Sur la chimiothérapie de l’onchocercose. (Note préliminaire).

Ann. Soc. belge Méd. trop., 27, 173-77, 1947.

First effective chemotherapy (suramin) for onchocerciasis.  With C. Heurard, E. Peel, and M. Wanson.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Black Fly-Borne Diseases › Onchocerciasis (river blindness), OPHTHALMOLOGY › Ophthalmic Parasitology, PHARMACOLOGY › Chemotherapy
  • 5351.5

A new, active metabolite of ‘Miracil D’.

Nature (Lond.), 208, 1005-06, 1965.

Lucanthone. With five co-authors.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES
  • 5351.6

Chemotherapy of experimental Schistosoma mansoni infections with a nitro-thiazole derivative, CIBA 32, 644-Ba.

Ann. trop. Med. Parasit., 58, 292-303, 1964.

Introduction of niridazole (Ambilhar).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis), PHARMACOLOGY › Chemotherapy
  • 5351.7

A new series of 2-aminomethyltetrahydroquinoline derivatives displaying schistosomicidal activity in rodents and primates.

Nature (Lond.), 222, 581-82, 1969.

Oxamniquinine.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Antihelminic (Anti-Worm) Medication
  • 5352

The bibliography of schistosomiasis (bilharziasis).

Cairo: Egyptian University, 1931.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › History of Infectious Disease, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis)
  • 5352.1

Bibliographie des schistosome et des schistosomiases (bilharzioses) humaines et animales de 1931 á 1948.

Mémoires, Institut Royal Colonial Belge, Section des Sciences Naturelles et Médicales, 18, fasc. 5, 1949.

Continues and supplements No. 5352.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis)
  • 5352.2

Bibliography of onchocerciasis.

Washington, DC: Pan American Sanitary Bureau, 1950.

Publication No. 242.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Black Fly-Borne Diseases › Onchocerciasis (river blindness), OPHTHALMOLOGY › Ophthalmic Parasitology
  • 5352.3

Annotated bibliography of filariasis and elephantiasis. 5 parts.

Nouméa, New Caledonia: South Pacific Commission, 19541960.

South Pacific Commission Technical Papers, Nos. 65, 88, 109 (and Supplement), 124, and 160.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Diseases, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › South Pacific, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Lymphatic Filariasis (Elephantiasis)
  • 5352.4

Bibliography of bilharziasis, 1949-1958.

Geneva: World Health Organization, 1960.

Continues and supplements Nos. 5352 and 5352.1



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Diseases, Global Health, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis)
  • 5352.5

Schistosomiasis. A bibliography of the world’s literature from 1852 to 1962. 2 vols.

Cleveland, OH: Western Reserve University Press, 1967.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › History of Infectious Disease, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis)
  • 5352.6

Schistosomiasis: the evolution of a medical literature. Selected abstracts and citations, 1852-1952.

Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1973.

Includes 384 core references and bibliography (without abstracts) covering 1963-72.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › History of Infectious Disease, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Aquatic Snail-Borne Diseases › Schistosomiasis (bilharziasis)
  • 5353

Nuovo verme intestinale umano (Agchylostoma duodenale), constituente un sesto genere dei nematoidei proprii dell’uomo.

Ann. univ. Med. (Milano), 106, 5-51, 1843.

Dubini first found the hookworm of ankylostomiasis in 1838. His account of 1843, describing it, named it Agchylostoma duodenale, a name etymologically erroneous. Partial English translation in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Hookworms
  • 5354

Bericht über die Leistungen im Gebiete der Helminthologie während des Jahres 1843 und 1844.

Arch. Naturgesch., 2, 202-55, 1845.

Siebold classified the hookworm as belonging to the Strongyloidae (pp. 220-21).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Hookworms
  • 5355

Klinische und anatomische Beobachtungen über die Krankheiten von Aegypten.

Arch. physiol. Heilk., 13, 528-75, 1854.

Griesinger connected the worm of ankylostomiasis with Egyptian chlorosis, a condition in which the worm had previously been noted without its being considered the causal agent (pp. 555-61). Apparently Bilharz in 1853 came to the same conclusion. The disease was for a time called “Griesinger’s disease”. Partial English translation in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Egypt, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease
  • 5356

Sobre a molestia vulgarmente denominada oppilaçao ou cançaço.

Gaz. med. Bahia, 1, 27-29, 39-41, 52-54, 63-64, 1886.

Wucherer confirmed Griesinger’s conclusion that the cause of tropical anemia was hookworm infestation. See also the same journal, 1869, 3, 170-72, 183-84, 198-200. English translation in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Hookworms
  • 5357

Intornoall’Anchilostoma duodenale (Dubini).

Gazz. med. ital. lomb., 7 ser., 5, 193-96, 1878.

Fecal diagnosis of hookworm disease. Before this time hookworm had been diagnosed only post mortem. With C. Parona and E. Parona. English translation in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Hookworms
  • 5358

L’anchilostomiasi e l’anemia che ne conseguita (anchilostomanemia).

G. int. Sci. med., n.s. 1, 1054-69, 1245-53, 1879.

Introduction of thymol as a hookworm vermifuge.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease
  • 5359

Remarks on parasites and scorpions.

Trans. Coll. Phys. Philad., 3 ser., 8, 441-43, 1886.

Leidy found the hookworm in the cat and suggested that it might also be found in man as a cause of pernicious anemia.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease, VETERINARY MEDICINE › Veterinary Parasitology
  • 5360

A case of ankylostomiasis.

Med. News (Philad.), 63, 662-63, 1893.

First recognition of ankylostomiasis in America. It had previously been reported and described under various names.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease
  • 5361

Notizen zur Helminthologie Aegyptens. Die Lebensgeschichte des Anchylostomum duodenale (Dub.).

Zbl. Bakt., I Abt., 20, 865-70; 24, 441-49, 483-88, 1896, 1898.

Looss elucidated the life cycle and mode of transmission of the hookworm. See also No. 5365. English translation in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Egypt, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Hookworms
  • 5362

Ueber das Eindringen der Ankylostomalarven in die menschliche Haut.

Zbl. Bakt., Abt. l, 29, Orig., 733-39, 1901.

Looss discovered that hookworms can penetrate the skin; he himself became infected when hookworm culture accidentally spilled on his hands. English translation in Kean (No. 2268.1).



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Hookworms
  • 5362.1

On the causal relationship between “ground itch”, or “pani-ghao”, and the presence of the larvae of the Ankylostoma duodenale in the soil.

Brit. med. J., 1, 190-93, 1902.

While a medical officer in the tea plantations in Assam, India, Bentley demonstrated the mode of entry of Ankylostoma into the body.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Hookworms
  • 5363

A new species of hookworm (Uncinaria americana) parasitic in man.

Amer. Med., 3, 777-78, 1902.

Discovery of the American species of hookworm, afterward re-named Necator americanus. It was later believed to have originated in Africa, being brought over by slaves.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Hookworms
  • 5365

The anatomy and life history of Agchylostoma duodenale Dub. A. monograph. 2 pts.

Cairo: National Printing Office, 19051911.

Vols. 3 and 4 of Records of the School of Medicine, Cairo. In 1898 Looss discovered that hookworm larvae can penetrate the skin. His monograph epitomized all knowledge of the condition to 1911.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Egypt, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Hookworms
  • 5366

La malattia dei minatory dal S. Gottardo al Sempione.

Torino: C. Pasta, 1910.

Includes reprints of Perroncito’s earlier papers. He insisted on the parasitic origin of the disease as it occurred among the St. Gotthard tunnellers in 1880, and he introduced Felix mas as a vermifuge against hookworm.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease, PARASITOLOGY › Helminths › Hookworms
  • 5367

Das Oleum chenopodii anthelmintici gegen Ankylostomiasis im Vergleich zu anderen Wurmmitteln.

Trans. Int. Congr. Hyg. Demogr., Washington 1, 734-39, 1912, 1913.

Schüffner and Vervoort introduced oil of chenopodium for the treatment of ankylostomiasis as early as 1900.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease
  • 5368

The use of carbon tetrachloride for the removal of hookworms.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 77, 1641-43, 1921.

Introduction of the carbon tetrachloride treatment of ankylostomiasis.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease
  • 5369

Bibliography of hookworm disease.

New York: Rockefeller Foundation & International Health Board, 1922.

Contains 5,680 references to all aspects of hookworm disease, prefaced by a short history. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease
  • 5369.1

Bibliography of hookworm disease (ancylostomiasis) 1920-62.

Geneva: World Health Organization, 1965.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Diseases, Global Health, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › DISEASES DUE TO METAZOAN PARASITES › Hookworm Disease
  • 5370

De malo recentiorum medicorum medendi usu libellus.

Venice: apud O. Scotum, 1536.

Includes (cap. XXXVI) an early account of typhus, morbus pulicaris. English translation in Major, Classic descriptions of disease, 3rd ed., Springfield: Charles C Thomas, 1945, p. 163.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 2528
  • 5371

De sympathia et antipathia rerum liber unus. De contagione et contagiosis morbis et curatione.

Venice: apud heredes L. Iuntae, 1546.

Though Fracastoro wrote this book more than a century before Leewenhoek invented the microscope, and could only express the theory of contagion in very general terms, this book represents a landmark in the development of ideas that centuries later led to the work of Bassi, Henle, Davaine, Koch, and others. For that reason we have classified Fracastoro as a precursor of foundational theories of infectious disease by microorganisms.

Fracastoro was the first to state the germ theory of infection. He suggested the contagiousness of tuberculosis. Haeser even describes him as the “founder of scientific epidemiology”. This book, which contains one of the first accounts of typhus (pp. 43-44), marks an epoch in the history of medicine, since Fracastorius enunciated in it, perhaps for the first time, the modern doctrine of the specific characters and infectious nature of fevers. He is remembered for his poem on syphilis, but he was also eminent as a physicist, geologist, astronomer, and pathologist. An English translation by W. C. Wright appeared in 1930. 



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › GENERAL PRINCIPLES of Infection by Microorganisms, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Tuberculosis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5372

Opera medicinalia.

Mexico: Pedro Ocharte, 1570.

Opera medicinalia was the first medical book printed in the Western Hemisphere, and its botanical images were the first illustrations of plants printed in the Western Hemisphere. Of the original edition only two copies are known, of which the only complete copy is at the La Biblioteca José María Lafragua at the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico. In 1862 American bookseller and bibliographer Henry Stevens purchased an incomplete copy at an auction sale of the library of collector/dealer/book thief Guglielmo Libri in London. This he resold to the American collector James Lennox. The Lennox copy is preserved in the New York Public Library. In 1970 London antiquarian booksellers Dawsons of Pall issued a facsimile of the complete Universidad de Puebla copy with a companion volume of commentary by Francisco Guerra.

"Opera Medicinalia consists of a set of treatises on various medical topics including a long discourse on a disease called “tabardete,” which may have been typhus, citing works on the topic by earlier Arab and Greek physicians. Typhus is a disease spread by lice, and was common on board ships crossing the Atlantic during the colonial period. Also included in the book is a long treatise in the form of a dialog on bloodletting accompanied by a simplistic woodcut of the venous system inspired by Andreas Vesalius’ Epistle [on Venesection], printed in Basel in 1539. Bravo also included a long discussion of the sarsaparilla plant (Smilax aspera), native to North America, including Mexico, whose roots were thought to cure a number of ailments. The book includes two woodcut illustrations of the plant by Juan Ortiz which were based upon illustrations from Pietro Mattioli’s Commentaries on Dioscorides (Commentarii… De Materia Medica) published in Venice in 1554. The fact that Bravo’s book was written in Latin, shows that it was aimed at a scholarly audience rather than the general public" (https://circulatingnow.nlm.nih.gov/2014/10/29/the-first-medical-book-printed-in-the-new-world/, accessed 02-2017).

Digital facsimile of the 1570 edition from primeroslibros.org at this link.

Portions of the book have been translated into Spanish as: 

BRAVO, Francisco, (ca 1525-1595) Observations on the raicilla, which in the indigenous language they call zarzaparrilla / Francisco Bravo Puebla; Preliminary study, translation into Spanish and notes by José Gaspar Rodolfo Cortés Riveroll; Paleography and biographies of Rodolfo Cortés Madrazo. Puebla, México: Benemérita Autonomous University of Puebla, Faculty of Medicine, 2011, 175 p., ISBN 978-607-487-326-9 [ View the full text of this work in PDF format ]

BRAVO, Francisco, (ca 1525-1595) On venosection in pleuritis and in general of other inflammations of the body / Francisco Bravo Puebla; Preliminary study, translation into Castilian and notes of Jose Gaspar Rodolfo Cortés Riveroll. Puebla, Mexico: Benemérita Autonomous University of Puebla, Faculty of Medicine, Dirección de Fomento Editorial, 2008, 206 p., ISBN 978-968-9391-408 [ View full text of this work in PDF format ]

 



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus, Latin American Medicine, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS, PHARMACOLOGY, THERAPEUTICS › Bloodletting
  • 5372.1

De febre purpura epidemiali et contagiosa libri duo.

Paris: apud M. Juvenem, 1578.

Coytard distinguished between petechial typhus and typhoid.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5373

Observationum medicarum Castrensium Hungaricarum.

Helmstadt: F. Lüderwald, 1685.

Pp. 49-51: Cober, a German physician, reported the relationship between typhus and pediculosis.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Hungary, DERMATOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus, PARASITOLOGY
  • 5374

Observations on the nature and cure of hospital and jayl-fevers.

London: A. Millar & D. Wilson, 1750.

Pringle was a strong advocate of better ventilation in prisons and hospitals as a means of preventing typhus, which he showed to be identical with “hospital fever”.



Subjects: HOSPITALS, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus, PUBLIC HEALTH, Ventilation, Health Aspects of
  • 5375

Ueber den ansteckenden Typhus.

Vienna, 1810.

Hildenbrand gave a classic description of typhus. The French literature sometimes refers to the condition as “Hildenbrand’s disease”. English translation by S. D. Gross, 1829.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5376

Ueber den Hungertyphus und einige verwandte Krankheitsformen.

Berlin: A. Hirschwald, 1868.

Virchow was instrumental in introducing into Germany an epidemiology based on the study of multiple factors – sociological as well as bacteriological. In the above report on the reappearance of typhus in Berlin and East Prussia, he showed the connection between famine conditions and typhus outbreaks and strongly emphasized the social element in the generation of typhus. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link. English translation, as On famine fever and some of the other cognate forms of typhus. A lecture for the benefit of the sufferers in East-Prussia. London: Williams and Norgate, 1868. Digital facsimile of the English translation from wellcomelibrary.org at this link.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus, PUBLIC HEALTH, SOCIAL MEDICINE
  • 5376.1

Das japanische Fluss- oder Ueberschwemmings-fieber, eine acute Infectionskrankheit.

Virchows Arch. path. Anat., 78, 373-420, 528-30, 1879.

Early scientific account of tsutsugamushi fever.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Japan, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections
  • 5377

Some observations on the so-called spotted fever of Idaho.

Med. Sentinel (Portland OR), 7, 433-38, 1899.

Rocky Mountain spotted fever first described.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Idaho
  • 5378

The transmission of Rocky Mountain spotted fever by the bite of the wood-tick (Dermacentor occidentalis).

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 47, 358, 1906.

Ricketts (who himself died of typhus) demonstrated that the wood tick Dermacentor andersoni is a vector of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American West, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  • 5379

A micro-organism which apparently has a specific relationship to Rocky Mountain spotted fever. A preliminary report.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 52, 379-80, 1909.

Description of the causal organism, in blood smears.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  • 5380

The relation of typhus fever (tabardillo) to Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

Arch. intern. Med., 5, 361-70, 1910.

Ricketts and Wilder differentiated Rocky Mountain spotted fever and typhus.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  • 5380.1

The etiology of the typhus fever (tabardillo) of Mexico City. A further preliminary report.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 54, 1373-75, 1910.

Demonstration of the causal organism of typhus.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia › Rickettsia prowazekii , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5381

On heterologous agglutinins more particularly those present in the blood serum of cerebro-spinal fever and typhus fever cases.

J. Hyg. (Camb.), 9, 316-40, 1909.

The reaction described by Wilson was later developed by Weil and Felix and named after them (see No. 5390). See also the paper by Wilson in J. Hyg., 1920, 19, 115-30.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Neuroinfectious Diseases › Meningitis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5382

An acute infectious disease of unknown origin. A clinical study based on 221 cases.

Amer. J. med. Sci., 139, 484-502, 1910.

“Brill’s disease” – recrudescent typhus; first description.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5383

Une fièvre éruptive observée en Tunisie.

Bull. Soc. Path. exot., 3, 492-96, 1910.

First description of fievre boutonneuse, a form of tick-borne typhus found in Tunisia.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Tunisia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases
  • 5384

Recherches experimentales sur le typhus exanthématique.

Ann. Inst. Pasteur, 24, 243-75; , 25, 97-144; 26, 250-80, 332-50, 19101911, 1912.

Nicolle demonstrated the transmission of typhus by the body louse Pediculus corporis. He also produced the disease in monkeys and guinea-pigs by the injection of infected blood. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1928. Preliminary communication in C. R. Acad. Sci. (Paris), 1909, 149, 486-89.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia › Rickettsia prowazekii , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5384.1

Ätiologische Untersuchungen über den Flecktyphus in Serbien 1913 und in Hamburg 1914.

Beitr. Klin. InfektKr., 4, 5-31, 1915.

Prowazek, like Ricketts and Wilder, demonstrated the specific causal agent in typhus. Like Ricketts he died of the disease.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia › Rickettsia prowazekii , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Germany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Serbia, Republic of, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5385

A note on a relapsing febrile illness of unknown origin.

Lancet, 2, 703-04, 1915.

First reported case of “trench fever”.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Bartonella › Bartonella quintana, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I
  • 5386

Intermittent fever of obscure origin, occurring among British soldiers in France. The so-called “trench-fever”.

Lancet, 2, 1133-36, 1915.

In this paper trench fever is so named for the first time.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Bartonella › Bartonella quintana, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I
  • 5387

Ueber eine neue periodische Fiebererkrankung (Febris Wolhynica).

Berl. klin. Wschr., 53, 322-23, 1916.

His encountered a form of “trench fever” in Volhynia, Russia, and named it after that district.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Bartonella › Bartonella quintana, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Russia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I
  • 5388

Zur Aetiologie des Fleckfiebers.

Berl. klin. Wschr., 53, 567-69, 1916.

Rickettsia prowazeki, cause of epidemic typhus, was first isolated by the Brazilian microbiologist Henrique da Rocha-Lima, who named it after Ricketts and Prowazek, both of whom died of the disease.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia › Rickettsia prowazekii , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5389

Zur Ursache und Uebertragung des Wolhynischen Fiebers.

Münch. med. Wschr., 63, 1495-96, 1916.

Isolation of Rickettsia quintana (now called Bartonella quintana) from lice found on patients suffering from trench fever.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Bartonella › Bartonella quintana, BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I
  • 5390

Zurserologischen Diagnose des Fleckfiebers.

Wien. klin. Wschr., 29, 33-35, Vienna, 1916.

Weil-Felix reaction for the diagnosis of typhus. See also the later paper in the same journal, 1916, 29, 974-78.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5391

Studies on Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

J. med. Res., 41, 1-197, 1919.

In his important aetiological and pathological studies of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Wolbach mentioned the causal agent Dermacentroxenus rickettsi.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  • 5392

Cultivation of rickettsia-like bodies in typhus fever.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 77, 1967-69, 1921.

Isolation of Rickettsia prowazeki from the blood. With S. A. Ritter and G. Baehr.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia › Rickettsia prowazekii , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5393

The etiology and pathology of typhus. Being the main report of the Typhus Research Commission of the League of Red Cross Societies to Poland.

Cambridge, MA: The League of Red Cross Societies at the Harvard University Press, 1922.

The carefully controlled experiments of Wolbach, Todd, and Palfrey eliminated all doubt that R. prowazeki was the causal agent in typhus. Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia › Rickettsia prowazekii , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5394

Tropical typhus in the Federated Malay States, with a compilation on epidemic typhus.

London: John Bale, 1925.

Bull. Inst. med. Res., F. M. S., No. 2. Drew attention to scrub typhus in Malaya.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia › Orientia Tsutsugamushi, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Malaysia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5395

The Weil-Felix reaction in sporadic tropical typhus.

London: John Bale, 1926.

Bull. Inst. Med. Res., F. M. S., 1926, No. 1. Demonstration that scrub-typhus patients developed agglutinins against the OX-K strain of B. proteus but not the OX-19 strain.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5396

Clinical observations on endemic typhus (Brill’s disease) in Southern United States.

Publ. Hlth. Rep. (Wash.), 41, 1213-20, 2967-95, 1926.

Maxcy described murine (flea-borne) typhus (“Maxcy’s disease”).



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia › Rickettsia typhi , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American South, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5396.1

Experiments relating to the pathology and the etiology of Mexican typhus (tabardillo).

J. infect. Dis., 43, 241-72, 1928.

Mooser differentiated murine from epidemic typhus. The causative organism was later named Rickettsia mooseri.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5396.2

Typhus fever. A virus of the typhus type derived from fleas collected from wild rats.

Publ. Hlth. Rep. (Wash.), 46, 334-38, 1931.

Murine typhus shown to be caused by an organism later named Rickettsia mooseri, transmitted by fleas from rats to man. With A. Rumreich and L. F. Badger.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5396.3

Aetiologie der Tsutsugamushi-Kiankheit: Rickettsia tsutsugamushi.

Zbl. Bakt., I Abt., Orig., 122, 249-53, 1931.

Ogata isolated the causal agent of tsutsugamushi disease, Orientia Tsutsugamushi,  in 1927.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia › Orientia Tsutsugamushi, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections
  • 5396.4

Varieties of typhus virus and the epidemiology of the American form of European typhus fever (Brill’s disease).

Amer. J. Hyg., 20, 513-32, 1934.

Zinsser advanced the theory that Brill’s disease is a recrudescence of epidemic typhus in persons who have contracted the typhus some time previously. The condition has subsequently been renamed “Brill-Zinsser disease”.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5397

“Q” fever, a new fever entity: clinical features and laboratory investigation.

Med. J. Aust., 2, 281-99, 1937.

First account of “Q” (query) fever. See also No. 5398.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections
  • 5398

Experimental studies on the virus of “Q” fever.

Med. J. Aust., 2, 299-305, 1937.

Discovery of Rickettsia burneti, causal agent in Q fever.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Rickettsial Infections, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 5398.1

Epidemic and endemic typhus. Protective value for guinea pigs of vaccines prepared from infected tissues of the developing chick embryo.

Publ. Hlth. Rep. (Wash.), 55, 110-15, 1940.

Typhus vaccine.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5398.2

Rickettsia disease of Malaya. Identity of tsutsugamushi and rural typhus.

Lancet, 1, 255-59, 305-11, 1940.

Lewthwaite and Savoor showed scrub typhus to be identical to tsutsugamushi fever.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia › Orientia Tsutsugamushi, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Malaysia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5398.3

The therapeutic effect of para-aminobenzic acid in louse-borne typhus fever.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 126, 349-56, 1944.

With J. C. Snyder, E. S. Murray, C. J. D. Zarafonetis, and R. S. Ecke.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia › Rickettsia prowazekii , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5399

Cultivation of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi in lungs of rodents. Preparation of a scrub-typhus vaccine.

Lancet, 2, 729-34, 1945.

Scrub-typhus vaccine.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Rickettsia › Orientia Tsutsugamushi, IMMUNOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus