An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15429 entries, 13282 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 23, 2021

Browse by Entry Number 10800–10899

99 entries
  • 10800

The historical ecology of malaria in Ethiopia: Deposing the spirits.

Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 2015.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Ethiopia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Malaria › History of Malaria
  • 10801

Marrow of tragedy: The health crisis of the American Civil War.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013.


Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE › History of U.S. Civil War Medicine, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health
  • 10802

Disease in the Civil War: Natural biological warfare in 1861-1865.

Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas, 1968.


Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE › History of U.S. Civil War Medicine, EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology
  • 10803

Medical history of a Civil War regiment: Disease in the sixty-fifth United States Colored Infantry.

Clayton, MO: Institute of Civil War Studies, 1977.


Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY › History of African Americans & Medicine & Biology, American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE › History of U.S. Civil War Medicine
  • 10804

Medical-military portraits of Union and Confederate generals.

Philadelphia: Whitmore Publishing Co., 1968.


Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE › History of U.S. Civil War Medicine
  • 10805

Sketch of the medical history of the British Armies in the Peninsula of Spain and Portugal, during the late campaigns.

Med. chir. Trans., 6, 381-489., 1815.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Portugal, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Spain, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Napoleon's Campaigns & Wars
  • 10806

Medicine and the American Revolution: How diseases and their treatments affected the colonial army.

Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1998.


Subjects: American (U.S.) REVOLUTIONARY WAR MEDICINE › History of U.S. Revolutionary War Medicine, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine
  • 10807

The history of the Boston Medical Library.

Norwood, MA: Privately Printed by the Plimpton Press, 1918.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Institutional Medical Libraries, Histories of, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 10808

The centennial history of the Boston Medical Library 1875-1975.

Boston: Boston Medical Library, 1975.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Institutional Medical Libraries, Histories of, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 10809

Dedication of the New Building and Hall of the Boston Medical Library Association, 19 Boylston Place, December 3, 1878. Order of exercises. Address by the president, Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes. Report of the building committee. Remarks by Dr. J. S. Billings, Prof. Justin Winsor, Dr. George H. Lyman, Charles W. Eliot, Dr. David P. Smith, Dr. Calvin Ellis, Dr. Henry I. Bowditch.

Cambridge, MA: Printed at the Riverside Press, 1881.

The printed wrapper of this pamphlet has a different text:

Address delivered at the dedication of the Hall of the Boston Medical Library Association, December III., MDCCLXXVIII., by Oliver Wendell Holmes, M.D., President. Report of C. P. Putnam, M.D. Remarks of J.S. Billings, M.D., Prof. Justin Winsor, C.H. Lyman, M.D., Pres. C. W. Lito, D.P. Smith, M.D., C. Ellis, M.D., H.I. Bowditch, M.D. Exhibition of medical portraits. Report of the librarian, James R. Chadwick, M.D. read at the sixth annual meeting, held on october IV, MDCCCLXXXI. Repot of F.C. Shattuck, M.D., on the directory for nurses.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.

Holmes's address was first published in the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, 99 (1878) 745-774.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Institutional Medical Libraries, Histories of, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 10810

A catalogue of the medieval and renaissance manuscripts and incunabula in the Boston Medical Library.

Boston: Privately Printed, 1944.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › 15th Century (Incunabula) & Medieval, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Institutional Medical Libraries
  • 10811

Scientists’ libraries: A handlist of printed sources.

Annals of Science, 40, 317-389, 1983.

Includes references to the libraries of many physicians.   Digital text available from historyofscience.com at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Physicians' / Scientists' Libraries
  • 10812

Observations on the epidemic now prevailing in the city of New-York; called the Asiatic or spasmodic cholera; with advice to the planters of the South, for the medical treatment of their slaves.

New York: Printed by George P. Scott and Co., 1832.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northeast, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American South, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera, Slavery and Medicine
  • 10813

An account of the slave trade on the coast of Africa.

London: J. Philips, 1788.

Falconbridge was a surgeon in the slave trade before becoming an abolitionist. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Africa, Slavery and Medicine
  • 10814

The art of preserving health: A poem.

London: A. Millar, 1744.

John Armstrong was the brother of George Armstrong. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.  The edition consisted of 1250 of which 50 were on "fine paper."



Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology › Poetry
  • 10815

The sickroom in Victorian fiction: The art of being ill.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2007.


Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology › Drama › Shakespeare
  • 10816

The physician in literature, edited by Norman Cousins.

Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders, 1982.

Sections are devoted to research and serendipity, the role of the physician, quacks and clowns, clinical descriptions in literature, doctors and students, the practice, women and healing, madness, dying, and the patient, among others.  The authors include Auden, Bellow, Dickens, Doyle, Fitzgerald, Flaubert, Goethe, Holmes, Keats, Mann, Maugham, Melville, Orwell, Schweitzer, Shakespeare, Shaw, Tolstoy, Twain, Williams, and Zinsser, etc.



Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 10817

Poetry and the doctors: A catalogue of poetical works written by physicians with biographical notes & An essay on the poetry of certain ancient practitioners of medicine, illustrated with translations from the Latin and by reproductions of the title pages of the rarer works.

Woodstock, VT: The Elm Tree Press, 1916.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology › Poetry
  • 10818

Chekhov's doctors: A collection of Chekhov's medical tales. Edited by Jack Coulehan.

Kent, OH: The Kent State University Press, 2003.

"Medicine is my lawful wife and literature my mistress; when I get tired of one, I spend the night with the other" is a well-known quote by Anton Chekhov, the Russian physician and writer. Founder of both the modern short story and modern prose drama, Chekhov practiced medicine in a sporadic manner throughout his life; doctors appear in 83 of his short stories.



Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 10819

Montaigne and medicine; being the essayist's comments on contemporary physic and physicians; his thoughts on many material matters relating to life and death; an account of his bodily ailments and peculiarities and of his travels in search of health.

London: Humphrey Milford, 1922.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 10820

Medical and allied topics in Latin poetry.

London: John Bale, 1928.


Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology › Poetry
  • 10821

Vital signs: Medical realism in 19th-century fiction.

Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1992.


Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 10822

The diagnosis of the acute abdomen in rhyme by Zeta.

London: H. K. Lewis, 1947.

 Cope published this humorous version of his Early diagnosis of the acute abdomen under the pseudonym Zeta.



Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology › Poetry , SURGERY: General
  • 10823

Early diagnosis of the acute abdomen.

London: Henry Frowde, 1921.

The classic treatise on the initial approach to abdominal pain. This work underwent its 22nd edition in 2011. 



Subjects: Emergency Medicine, PAIN / Pain Management, SURGERY: General
  • 10824

The dispensatory of the United States of America.

Philadelphia: Grigg and Elliot, 1833.

Digital facsimile of this, the first, and later editions from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Medical Botany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS
  • 10825

Medical and dental colleges of the west: Historical and biographical.

Chicago, IL: Oxford Publishing Company, 1896.

Covers institutions in Chicago and environs: Augustana Hospital, the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, Mercy Hospital, Michael Reese Hospital, Northwestern University Medical School, Northwestern University Woman's Medical School, Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Rush Medical College, and St. Luke's Hospital. Also the Battle Creek, Michigan sanitarium. Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Midwest, DENTISTRY, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Illinois
  • 10826

The Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia: Benefactors, alumni, hospital, etc., its founders, officers, instructors, 1826-1904: A history. Edited by George M. Gould. 2 vols.

New York: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1904.

A massive history, consisting of nearly 1100 pages. Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Pennsylvania
  • 10827

The College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, and its founders, officers, instructors, benefactors and alumni: A history. Edited by John Shrady. 2 vols.

New York: The Lewis Publishing Company, circa 1903.

A massive history of nearly 1200 pages issued by the publisher of the similarly huge history of the Rush Medical College (No. 10826). Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › New York
  • 10828

Humane society leaders in America. With a sketch of the early history of the humane movement in England.

Albany, NY: The American Humane Association, 1924.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection
  • 10829

Experimentation on animals, as a means of knowledge in physiology, pathology, and practical medicine.

New York: F. W. Christern, 1875.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection
  • 10830

Animal experimentation: A series of statements indicating its value to biological and medical science.

Boston, MA: Little, Brown, 1902.

Contributors included Charles Elliot, G. Stanley Hall, William T. Sedgwick, James J. Putnam, Henry P. Bowditch, William T. Porter, William T. Councilman, Theobald Smith, and members of the religious community.  Digital facsimile of Harvey Cushing's copy at Yale from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection
  • 10831

1000 Ärzte gegen die Vivisektion (wissenschaftliche Tierfolter) wegen ihrer Grausamkeit und Nutzlosigkeit.

Basel, Bern, Zurich: Verband der Schweizerischen Vereine gegen die Vivisektion, 1935.

Considered a classic of the anti-vivisection movement.



Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection
  • 10832

Animal experimentation and medical progress.

Boston & New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1914.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection
  • 10833

The vivisection question.

New Haven, CT: The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Company, 1901.

Leffingwell sought a middle ground between the anti-vivisectionists, who callled for the abolition of all experimentation, and vivisectionists who rejected any restraint. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection
  • 10834

A bibliography on animal rights and related matters.

Lantham, MD: University Press of America, 1981.

"... restricted to literature in the English language, with over 3200 entries; it is also confined to the thought and practices of the Western world, from Biblical times to 1980." Concerns much on animal experimentation and the antivivisection movement.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Subjects, LAW and Medicine & the Life Sciences, Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection
  • 10835

The humane movement: A descriptive survey.

New York: Columbia University Press, 1910.

Concerns the origins and evolution of the humane movement that played a significant role in the emergence and growth of the antivivisection movement in the United States. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection
  • 10836

Biological experimentation: Its function and limits.

London: George Bell & Sons, 1896.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design, Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection
  • 10838

The scalpel and the butterfly: The war between animal research and animal protection.

New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2001.


Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection
  • 10839

Report of the Royal Commission on the Practice of Subjecting Live Animals to Experiments for Scientific Purposes: With minutes and evidence and appendix.

London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1876.

This commission, or others with a similar name, seems to have continued intermittently in England for several decades, with the fourth report of the Royal Commission on Vivisection issued as late as 1908.

Digital facsimile of the 1876 report from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Medicine: General Works › Experimental Design › Vivisection / Antivivisection
  • 10840

Scrapie and Kuru.

Lancet, 274, 289-290., 1959.

In 1959 Hadlow, a veterinarian, visited a medical exposition in England where Carlton Gajdusek posted pathological slides of autopsied Kuru brains and a clinical description of the illness. He realized that Gajdusek's slides and clinical descriptions were almost identical to an illness that he had been studying in sheep (Scrapie). It was well known that Scrapie was a transmissible, infectious illness. In his paper Hadlow postulated several landmark ideas:

1) Kuru was similar to Scrapie.

2) Kuru was transmissible.

3) Hadlow also suggested that to demonstrate transmissibilty one should inject brain tissue from Kuru victims into chimp brains since they are so closely related to humans.

4) He also noted that many months or years might be required before disease would be recognizable in non-human primates.

All of Hadlow's assertions were later confirmed.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Prion Diseases, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 10841

Kuru and cannibalism.

Lancet, 292, 449-452., 1968.

Medical anthropologists Lindenbaum and Glass demonstrated that Kuru was transmitted in New Guinea by cannibalism--particularly by eating the brains of infected victims, which were the reservoir of prions. Order of authorship in the original publication was Matthews, Glasse, Lindenbaum.

"Lindenbaum and Glasse discovered that the Fore people partook in a ritual called mortuary cannibalism, where kin honored the dead by feasting on their cooked bodies. People avoided eating kin who died of dysentery and leprosy, but did not shy away from eating people who died of kuru. Through oral histories, it was determined that the kuru epidemic had begun among the northernmost Fore at the turn of the century, some time in the 1890s. It is now presumed that a spontaneous case of Creutzfeldt Jacob Disease (like kuru, a prion-related disorder) occurred at that time. When that person died and was consumed by kin, the kuru epidemic spread further south. Lindenbaum and Glasse noted also that the geographic spread of kuru closely matched the practice of mortuary cannibalism throughout this region, providing substantial evidence that cannibalism was the mode of transmission. Moreover, the research team noted that women and children were primarily impacted by kuru, which matched with the participants in this tradition. Men were less likely than women to partake in mortuary cannibalism, and when they did, they were less likely to eat women. As a result, men were less likely to get kuru compared to women and children.[2] Professor Lindenbaum's work was originally resisted by genetic and biomedical researchers who insisted the disease was likely genetic and non-infectious" (Wikipedia article on Shirley Lindenbaum, accessed 6-2019.)

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Papua New Guinea, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Prion Diseases
  • 10842

Identification of a protein that purifies with the Scrapie prion.

Science, 218, 1309-1311, 1982.

Research with the biochemist Bolton enabled Prusiner to discover and characterize the specific protein causing prion disease. This paper was dated December 24, 1982.

Nearly simultaneously, Prusiner and the same co-authors published an additional, longer paper dated December 21, 1982, further characterizing the pure protein of the infectious agent:

"Further purification and characterization of Scrapie prions," Biochemistry, 21 (1982) 6942-6950. 

These papers provided the necessary evidence to convince members of the scientific community, and eventually led to Prusiner's Nobel Prize.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for these references and their interpretation.)

 



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Prion Diseases, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 10843

Fatal familial insomnia and dysautonomia with selective degeneration of thalamic nuclei.

New Eng. J. Med., 315, 997-1003., 1986.

The authors coined the name Fatal Familial Insomnia to describe a family cohort of individuals who were dying from a prion illness causing an inability to sleep. This disease has been characterized as one of the most cruel illnesses to affect mankind. Order of authorship in the original publication was Lugaresi, Medori, ... Gambetti.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Prion Diseases
  • 10844

A new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the UK.

Lancet, 347, 921-925., 1996.

During the 1990s England was plagued with cases of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) seen in cows, popularly known as "Mad Cow Disease." Then physicians in England started noticing an uptick in cases of what looked like Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Will and Ironside noticed distinct pathological differences between classic CJD and what they called  variant CJD (vCJD). They then made the terrifying connection between it and ingestion of tainted beef, leading to panic in some regions and avoidance of beef consumption in others. In the process the wider public became aware of prion diseases. Order of authorship in the original publication was, Will, Ironside, Zeidler....

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Prion Diseases, NEUROLOGY › Degenerative Disorders, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 10845

La sexualidad femenina. Una investigación estadística.

Barcelona: Pulso Editorial, 1971.

"Between 1932 and 1961 Serrano Vicéns systematically studied the sexuality of 1417 women who went through his surgery. With that data, he wrote a book entitled "Female sexuality. A statistical investigation " that remained unpublished for years due to the difficulties of publishing a book on that subject in Spain governed by General Franco. With the approval of the author, the book circulated  privately in different universities inside and outside the country.  Serrano Vicéns's data was highly praised by a better-known researcher of contemporary human sexual behavior: Alfred C. Kinsey" (Wikipedia article on Ramon Serrano Vicéns, accessed 6-2019).

 



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Spain, SEXUALITY / Sexology
  • 10846

Informe sexual de la mujer española.

Madrid: Lyder, 1978.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Spain, SEXUALITY / Sexology
  • 10847

Sittengeschichte des Weltkrieges. 2 vols.

Leipzig & Vienna: Verlag für Sexualwissenschaft, 1930.

Sexuality in World War I. Abridged translation into English Sexual History of the World War (New York, Panurge Press, 1934). Only a small sampling of the plates from the German edition were issued as Illustrated Supplement to The Sexual History of the World War (New York: Panurge Press, n.d).



Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I, SEXUALITY / Sexology
  • 10848

Jahrbuch für sexuelle Zwischenstufen. Edited by Magnus Hirschfeld.

Leipzig: Max Spohr, 18991933.

"An annual publication of the Scientific-Humanitarian Committee (Wissenschaftlich-humanitäres Komitee, WhK), an early LGBT rights organization founded by Magnus Hirschfeld in 1897. The periodical featured articles on scientific, literary, and political topics related to sexual and gender minorities. It was published regularly from 1899 to 1923 (sometimes quarterly) and more sporadically until 1933.[1]" (Wikipedia)  

Hirschfeld's institute was closed by the Nazis in 1933; they also destroyed the research library of his institute. 



Subjects: SEXUALITY / Sexology, SEXUALITY / Sexology › Homosexuality
  • 10849

The early homosexual rights movement (1864–1935).

New York: Times Change Press, 1994.

Revised edition, 1995.



Subjects: SEXUALITY / Sexology › History of Sexuality / Sexology, SEXUALITY / Sexology › Homosexuality
  • 10850

The ophthalmoscope - Der Augenspiegel. Textbook and atlas. 2 vols. Translated by Donald L. Blanchard.

Ostende: J. P. Wayenborgh, 19961997.


Subjects: INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › History of Biomedical Instrumentation, INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › Medical Instruments › Ophthalmoscope, OPHTHALMOLOGY › History of Ophthalmology, OPHTHALMOLOGY › Ophthalmoscopy
  • 10851

Religious dances in the Christian church and in popular medicine. Translated from the Swedish by E. Classen.

London: George Allen & Unwin, 1952.


Subjects: RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine
  • 10852

The epidemic of 1830-1833 in California and Oregon.

Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1955.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › California, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Oregon
  • 10853

Medicine-men on the North Pacific Coast.

Ottawa: National Museum of Canada, 1958.


Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Cultural Anthropology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, NATIVE AMERICANS & Medicine, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine › Shamanism / Neoshamanism
  • 10854

The ethnobotany of pre-Columbian Peru.

Chicago, IL: Aldine, 1961.

"....based on analysis of 2200 wild and cultivated plant specimens with clearly defined archaeological contexts... Part I is a systematic ethnobotany with pertinent citations of the botanical and archaeological literature, and includes a list of plants according to their uses. Part II is a chronological and regional treatment of plants integrated with useful summaries of the archaeological contexts from which the plants came. This section enables the reader to view the course of plant domestication form the states of premaize, incipient agriculture to the stage of intensive agriculture when some 50 cultivated plants were utilized...." (publisher)



Subjects: BOTANY › Ethnobotany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Peru
  • 10855

Mohave ethnopsychiatry and suicide: The psychiatric knowledge and the psychic disturbances of an Indian tribe.

Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1961.


Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, NATIVE AMERICANS & Medicine, PSYCHIATRY, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine › Shamanism / Neoshamanism
  • 10856

Plants of the gods: Their sacred, healing and hallucinogenic powers.

Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 1992.


Subjects: BOTANY › Ethnobotany, PSYCHIATRY › Psychopharmacology
  • 10857

Peyote: an account of the origins and growth of the Peyote religion.

New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1971.

"The Peyote religion is a medico-religious cult. In considering native American medicines, one must always bear in mind the difference between the aboriginal concept of a medicinal agent and that of our modern Western medicine. Primitive societies, in general, cannot conceive of natural death or illness but believe that they are due to supernatural interference. There are two types of "medicines": those with purely physical effects (i.e., to relieve toothache or digestive upsets); and the medicines, "par excellence", that put the medicine man into communication, through a variety of hallucinations, with the malevolent spirits that cause illness and death" (Schultes & Hofman [1992] https://www.peyote.org/, accessed 6-2019)



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, Magic & Superstition in Medicine, PSYCHIATRY › Psychopharmacology › History of Psychopharmacology, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine › Shamanism / Neoshamanism
  • 10858

The pre-Columbian mind: A study into the aberrant nature of sexual drives, drugs affecting behaviour and the attitude towards life and death, with a survey of psychotherapy in pre-Columbian America.

New York & London: Seminar Press, 1971.


Subjects: Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine, PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, PSYCHIATRY › Psychopharmacology › History of Psychopharmacology, SEXUALITY / Sexology › History of Sexuality / Sexology, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine › Shamanism / Neoshamanism
  • 10859

Outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome - Worldwide, 2003.

Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. (MMWR) 52, 226-228, 2003.

First description of the scope of the outbreak dated March 21, 2003,  preliminary case definition, and interim infection control guidance for the United States. Available from the CDC at this link.

One week later the CDC published "Update: Outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome - worldwide," MMWR, 52, 241-248.

Dated March 28, 2003, this detailed meticulous patient contact tracing on the ground and identified "patient zero" while preserving his/her anonymity. Available from the CDC at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome)
  • 10860

Coronavirus as a possible cause of severe acute respiratory syndrome.

Lancet, 361, 1319-1325, 2003.

 Dated April 19, 2003, this paper identified and reproduced microscopic images of the novel viral agent. It was the first official journal publication on SARS. Order of authorship in the published paper was Peiris, Lai, Poon,...SARS study group.

 (Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Coronaviruses (Coronaviridae), VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Coronaviruses (Coronaviridae) › SARS
  • 10861

A novel coronavirus associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome.

New Eng. J. Med., 348, 1953-1966, 2003.

Ksiazek and over 40 co-authors around the world published the lead article in the May 15, 2003 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine that was nearly entirely devoted to SARS. Order of authorship in the published paper was Ksiazek, Erdman, Goldsmith,...SARS Working Group. Available from nejm.org at this link.

In an editorial entitled "SARS, the Internet, and the Journal" J. M. Drazen and E.W. Campion explained how the Internet enabled prior publication online of the papers, and that extremely fast electronic publication speeded scientific collaboration, and rapid suppression of the epidemic.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Coronaviruses (Coronaviridae), VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Coronaviruses (Coronaviridae) › SARS
  • 10862

Characterization of a novel coronavirus associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome.

Science, 300, 1394-1399, 2003.

Dated May 30, 2003. Rota and team at the CDC determined the sequence of the complete genome of SARS-CoV, and characterized the viral genome. Order of authorship in the published paper was Rota, Oberste, Monroe....DeRisi...

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)

 



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Coronaviruses (Coronaviridae) › SARS
  • 10863

The genome sequence of the SARS-associated coronavirus.

Science, 300, 1399-1404, 2003.

Dated May 30, 2003 and published immediately after No. 10862 in the same issue of Science, this reported the work of Marco Marra and his team in Canada. Order of authorship in the published paper was Marra, Jones, Astell and about 40 co-authors.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genomics › Pathogenomics, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Coronaviruses (Coronaviridae), VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Coronaviruses (Coronaviridae) › SARS
  • 10864

Bats are natural reservoirs of SARS-like coronaviruses.

Science, 310, 676-679, 2005.

Dated October 28, 2005, roughly two years after the outbreak of SARS, the natural reservoirs of this class of coronaviruses was discovered.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Coronaviruses (Coronaviridae) › SARS
  • 10865

Comparative anatomy and phylogeny of primate muscles and human evolution.

Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press & Jersey, British Isles: Science Publishers, 2012.

1027pp. The most comprehensive review of the comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of the head, neck, pectoral and upper limb muscles of primates. The format is unusual with the text occupying the first 134pp., followed by 20 pages of bibliographical references. The remainder of the book consists of Appendix 1. Tables of primate head, neck, pectoral and upper limb muscles (pp. 155-896), And Appendix 2: Photographs of primate head, neck, pectoral and upper limb muscles. This covers pp. 897-1020 and consists of over 240 color plates of dissections.



Subjects: COMPARATIVE ANATOMY, EVOLUTION › Human Origins / Human Evolution, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Primatology
  • 10866

A history of bisexuality.

Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2001.


Subjects: SEXUALITY / Sexology › Bisexuality, SEXUALITY / Sexology › History of Sexuality / Sexology
  • 10867

Bisexuality: A study.

London: Quartet, 1977.

Based on interviews with 150 self-identified bisexuals, equal numbers of men and women.



Subjects: SEXUALITY / Sexology, SEXUALITY / Sexology › Bisexuality
  • 10868

Sorcerers and healing spirits: Continuity and change continuity in an Aboriginal medical system.

Canberra, Australia: Australian National University Press, 1983.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Australia, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine › Shamanism / Neoshamanism
  • 10869

Sorcery and healing: The meaning of illness and death to an Australian aboriginal community.

Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1978.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Australia, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine › Shamanism / Neoshamanism
  • 10870

The health of immigrant Australia: A social perspective.

Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders, 1990.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Australia
  • 10871

Wizard of the Upper Amazon. The story of Manuel Córdova-Rios. By F. Bruce Lamb.

New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1971.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Peru, Magic & Superstition in Medicine, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine › Shamanism / Neoshamanism
  • 10872

Rio Tigre and beyond: The Amazon jungle medicine of Manual Cordova-Rios. By F. Bruce Lamb.

Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books, 1993.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Peru, Magic & Superstition in Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › Ethnopharmacology, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine › Shamanism / Neoshamanism
  • 10873

Shamanism: Soviet studies of traditional religion in Siberia and Central Asia. Edited by Marjorie Mandelstam Balzer.

Armonk, NY: M. E. Sharpe, Inc., 1990.

Shamanism may have originated among the Turkic peoples of Siberia. English translations of studies by Russian scholars with an introduction and a thorough bibliography.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Central Asia, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Siberia, RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine › Shamanism / Neoshamanism
  • 10874

The medicine men: Oglala Sioux ceremony and healing.

Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press & Bloomington, IN: American Indian Studies Research Institute, 1990.


Subjects: NATIVE AMERICANS & Medicine, TRADITIONAL, Folk or Indigenous Medicine › Shamanism / Neoshamanism, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › South Dakota
  • 10875

A history of Hindu chemistry from the earliest times to the middle of the sixteenth century, A.D. With Sanskrit texts, variants, translation and illustrations. 2 vols.

Calcutta: Bengal Chemical & Pharmaceutical Works, 19021909.

Digital facsimile of the 1903 revised 2nd ed. plus the 1st ed. of vol. 2 from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › India › History of Ancient Medicine in India, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, Chemistry › History of Chemistry
  • 10876

Severe respiratory illness associated with a novel coronavirus - Saudi Arabia and Qatar, 2012.

Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. (MMWR) 61, 820., 2012.

Reports on the first two patients affected by a "new" coronavirus. The first patient, hospitalized in June 2012, died, and the other was in both pulmonary and renal failure. In this paper the CDC referenced a website posting by the WHO, offering "interim case definitions" and criteria for "probable case" and "confirmed case." This paper is available from the CDC at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Qatar, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Saudi Arabia, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) , VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Coronaviruses (Coronaviridae) › MERS
  • 10877

Brief Report: Isolation of a novel coronavirus from a man with pneumonia in Saudi Arabia.

New Eng. J. Med., 367, 1814-1820, 2012.

This paper, dated November 8, 2012, characterized the virus up to and including its genome sequence, including radiology and imaging findings, lab findings, diagnosis and management. The authors tentatively named the virus "HCoV-EMC" for Human and the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, where the lead author, Zaki, sent the virus to be sequenced. Taxonomists later renamed the virus MERS-CoV.  Available from nejm.org at this link.

Remarkably, for political reasons Zaki lost his job at a private hospital in Saudi Arabia immediately after he sent the disease sample to Rotterdam. He also had to flee the country immediately. Details of this firing were reported on FluTrackers.com at this link. Further details were reported in Nature Middle East on June 2, 2014 at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Saudi Arabia, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) , VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Coronaviruses (Coronaviridae) › MERS
  • 10878

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus in bats, Saudi Arabia.

Emerg. Infect. Dis., 19, 1819-1823, 2013.

Dated November 2013. The authors collected bat feces from sites in Bisha, Saudi Arabia found less than 1-12 kilometers from the place of employment or home of an index case-patient there, and performed total nucleic acid extraction, and used PCR to amplify a chosen segment that showed 100% nucleotide identity correlation between human and bat virus.

Available from PubMedCentral at this link.

Remarkably, it was reported by Reuters on June 3, 2014, that Memish, who was Deputy Health Minister in Saudi Arabia when the paper was published, later lost his position for political reasons, after he was criticized by international organizations for failure to collaborate with international laboratories on MERS research. The Reuters article reported that 575 people in the kingdom were then infected with MERS, and that the disease had "spread around the world."

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Saudi Arabia, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) , POLITICS, MEDICAL, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Coronaviruses (Coronaviridae) › MERS
  • 10879

Brief report: Evidence for camel-to-human transmission of MERS coronavirus.

New Eng. J. Med., 370, 2499-2505, 2014.

Dated June 26, 2014. Using viral genomics and PCR, the Saudi authors demonstrated that full genome sequences of a man, and the camel he had contact with, were identical. Available from nejm.org at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Saudi Arabia, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) , VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Coronaviruses (Coronaviridae) › MERS
  • 10880

Identification of herpesvirus-like DNA sequences in AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma.

Science, 266, 1865-1869, 1994.

Dated December 16, 1994. Order of authorship in the original paper was Chang, Cesarman, Pessin,...Moore. The authors reported a new human herpesvirus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, and gave it the descriptive name KSHV (Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpes Virus). Digital facsimile from tumorvirology.pitt.edu at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY › Specific Dermatoses, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Kaposi's Sarcoma / HHV-8, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, ONCOLOGY & CANCER, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Herpesviridae › Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)
  • 10881

Detection of herpesvirus-like DNA sequences in Kaposi's sarcoma in patients with and those without HIV infection.

New Eng. J. Med., 332, 1181-1185, 1995.

Dated May 4, 1995. Order of authorship in the original publication was Moore, Chang. That the virus causing Kaposi's sarcoma appeared in healthy as well as HIV patients suggested that this virus causes cancer only in those whose immune system T cells and other immune cells are not functioning properly. Available from nejm.org at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY › Specific Dermatoses, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Kaposi's Sarcoma / HHV-8, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, ONCOLOGY & CANCER, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Herpesviridae › Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)
  • 10882

Human herpesvirus 8 Is present in the lymphoid system of healthy persons and can reactivate in the course of AIDS.

J. infect. Dis., 173, 542-549, 1996.

Dated June 22, 1995. Order of authorship in the original paper was Bigoni, Dolcetti, de Lellis....By this time Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) was also known as human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8).

The authors wrote in their introduction: "Therefore, HHV-8 is fairly common in the population, and the lymphoid system could represent a reservoir of latently infected cells from which the virus may reactivate in conditions of immunodepression....In conclusion, the relatively common finding of HHV-8DNA sequences in the human population suggests a general exposure to the virus...." 

Available from watermark.silverchair.com at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: DERMATOLOGY › Specific Dermatoses, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Kaposi's Sarcoma / HHV-8, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, ONCOLOGY & CANCER, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Herpesviridae › Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)
  • 10883

The Environment and disease: Association or causation?

Proc. roy. Soc. Med., 58, 295-300., 1965.

"In 1965, the English statistician Sir Austin Bradford Hill proposed a set of nine criteria to provide epidemiologic evidence of a causal relationship between a presumed cause and an observed effect. (For example, he demonstrated the connection between cigarette smoking and lung cancer.) The list of the criteria is as follows:[1]

  1. Strength (effect size): A small association does not mean that there is not a causal effect, though the larger the association, the more likely that it is causal.
  2. Consistency (reproducibility): Consistent findings observed by different persons in different places with different samples strengthens the likelihood of an effect.
  3. Specificity: Causation is likely if there is a very specific population at a specific site and disease with no other likely explanation. The more specific an association between a factor and an effect is, the bigger the probability of a causal relationship.[1]
  4. Temporality: The effect has to occur after the cause (and if there is an expected delay between the cause and expected effect, then the effect must occur after that delay).
  5. Biological gradient: Greater exposure should generally lead to greater incidence of the effect. However, in some cases, the mere presence of the factor can trigger the effect. In other cases, an inverse proportion is observed: greater exposure leads to lower incidence.[1]
  6. Plausibility: A plausible mechanism between cause and effect is helpful (but Hill noted that knowledge of the mechanism is limited by current knowledge).
  7. Coherence: Coherence between epidemiological and laboratory findings increases the likelihood of an effect. However, Hill noted that "... lack of such [laboratory] evidence cannot nullify the epidemiological effect on associations".
  8. Experiment: "Occasionally it is possible to appeal to experimental evidence".
  9. Analogy: The use of analogies or similarities between the observed association and any other associations.
  10. Some authors consider also, the Reversibility: If the cause is deleted then the effect should disappear as well" (Wikipedia article on Bradford Hill criteria, accessed 7-2019)


Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • 10884

Des caractères anatomiques des grands singes pseudo-anthropomorphes.

Arch. Mus. d'Hist. Nat., 8, 1- 248, 18551856.

With 16 lithographed plates, this continues to be one of the most frequently cited of all works in the history of primate anatomy.



Subjects: COMPARATIVE ANATOMY, EVOLUTION › Human Origins / Human Evolution, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Primatology
  • 10885

Preliminary observations on the microorganism of Texas fever.

Med. News (Phila.), 55, 689-693, 1889.

First report on the discovery of a Babesia, cause of Babesiosis. Smith first observed the microscopic organism in the summer of 1886, but mentioned Babes's work in this paper, perhaps resulting in Babes being credited with the discovery.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Babesiosis, MICROBIOLOGY, PARASITOLOGY, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Texas
  • 10886

Piroplasmosis in man: Report on a case.

Doc. Med. Geog. Trop., 9, 11-16, 1957.

Order of authorship in the original paper was Škrabalo, Deanovic. First report of a case of babesiosis in a human, in this case an immunocompromised patient in Zagreb, (now Croatia). Piroplasmosis is another term for babesiosis.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Croatia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Babesiosis, PARASITOLOGY
  • 10887

Babesiosis in a Massachusetts resident.

New Eng. J. Med., 283, 854-856, 1970.

Order of authorship in the original paper was Western, Benson, Gleason. First report of babesiosis in a non-immuncompromised patient, confirming the potential wide spread of this tick-transmitted illness. 

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Babesiosis, PARASITOLOGY, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 10888

Human babesiosis on Nantucket Island, USA: Description of the vector, Ixodes dammini, N. Sp. (Acarina: Ixodidae)

J. med. Entomol., 15, 218-234, 1979.

Order of authorship in the original paper was Spielman, Clifford, Piesman. The authors identified and described the insect vector of Babesiosis. This was a new species; the same species causes Lyme disease.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Babesiosis, PARASITOLOGY, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts, ZOOLOGY › Arthropoda › Entomology
  • 10889

Infection with a Babesia-like organism in Northern California.

New Eng. J. Med., 332, 298-303, 1995.

Order of authorship in the original paper was Persing, Herwaldt, Glaser. First report of a Basisa duncani infection in humans (4 patients). The authors designated the infection as Babesia (WA1) strain transmitted by Ixodes pacificus, the west coast species name for Ixodes dammini, vector of babesiosis on the East coast. Available from nejm.org at this link

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Babesiosis, PARASITOLOGY, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › California
  • 10890

Syphilis: Its nature & diffusion popularly considered.

Melbourne, Australia: George Robertson, 1869.

The first work on dermatology or syphilology written, printed and published in Australia. This work is illustrated with chromolithographed plates printed in Australia. This may be the earliest medical book printed in Australia with chromolithographed illustrations. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Australia, DERMATOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Syphilis, Illustration, Medical
  • 10891

Original contributions to the practice of conservative surgery; being a selection from the surgical cases occurring in the practice of James G. Beaney.

Melbourne, Australia: George Robertson, 1859.

The first work on surgery written and published in Australia, and one of the first medical works on any subject written and published in Australia.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Australia, SURGERY: General
  • 10892

A doctor in the garden: Nomen medici in botanicis. Australian flora and the world of medicine.

Herston, Qld., Australia: Amphion Press, [University of Queensland], 2001.


Subjects: BOTANY › Medical Botany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Australia
  • 10893

Lewis's 1844-1944: A brief account of a century's work.

London: H. K. Lewis, 1945.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Medical Publishers, Histories of
  • 10894

On Australasian climates and their influence in the prevention and arrest of pulmonary consumption.

Melbourne, Australia, 1863.

Digital facsimile from wellcomecollection.org at this link.



Subjects: Bioclimatology, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Australia, PULMONOLOGY › Lung Diseases › Pulmonary Tuberculosis
  • 10895

The pursuit of oblivion: A global history of narcotics.

London: Wiedenfeld, 2001.


Subjects: ANESTHESIA › History of Anesthesia, PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals, TOXICOLOGY › Drug Addiction › History of Drug Addiction
  • 10896

Former fellows of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. 1783-2002. Biographical index. 2 vols.

Edinburgh: The Royal Society of Edinburgh, 2006.


Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works), COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Scotland
  • 10897

Natural science collections in Scotland: Botany, geology, zoology.

Edinburgh: National Museums of Scotland, 1987.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Scotland, MUSEUMS › History of Museums, MUSEUMS › Natural History Museums / Wunderkammern, NATURAL HISTORY › History of Natural History
  • 10898

Drugs and foods from little-known plants: Notes in Harvard University herbaria.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1973.

5178 field notes of health and medical interest from specimens in Harvard University herbaria.



Subjects: BOTANY › Ethnobotany, PHARMACOLOGY › Ethnopharmacology
  • 10899

Human infection with Ehrlichia canis, a leukocytic rickettsia.

New Eng. J. Med., 316, 853-856, 1987.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Maeda, Markowitz, Hawley. First description of Ehrlichiosis in humans, description of the organism, and successful drug treatment with doxycycline. The pathogen was later identified as Ehrlichia chaffeensis.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales, BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Ehrlichia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Ehrlichiosis