An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15423 entries, 13280 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 17, 2021

Browse by Entry Number 5000–5099

132 entries
  • 5000

Bibliotheca chirurgica. 2 vols.

Vienna: J. T. de Trattner, 1781.

Fulton (No. 6785) points out that this work contains the “most complete bibliographical study of the literature of head injury that had been brought together up to that time”. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographical Classics, NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology, NEUROSURGERY › Head Injuries, NEUROSURGERY › History of Neurosurgery
  • 5001

The mad folk of Shakespeare. 2nd ed.

London: Macmillan, 1867.

First published as The psychology of Shakespeare, London, 1859.



Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology › Drama › Shakespeare, PSYCHOLOGY › History of Psychology
  • 5002

Die Entdeckung des Hypnotismus: nebst einer ungedruckten Original-Abhandlung von [James] Braid in deutscher Übersetzung.

Berlin: Gebrüder Paetel, 1881.

A translation into German by Preyer of a previously unpublished work on the history of hypnosis by James Braid. 



Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, PSYCHOLOGY › History of Psychology, PSYCHOTHERAPY › Hypnosis › History of Psychotherapy: Hypnosis
  • 5003

Chapters in the history of the insane in the British Isles.

London: Kegan Paul, 1882.


Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 5003.1

The insane in the United States and Canada.

London: H. K. Lewis, 1885.

The first history of psychiatry in the United States and Canada. Chapter 5 is the first survey of psychiatry in Canada.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 5004

Gedenktage der Psychiatrie und ihrer Hülfsdisciplinen in allen Ländern. 4te. Aufl.

Berlin: G. Reimer, 1893.

A history of the subject, arranged in calendar form.



Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 5005

Die Literatur der Psychiatrie, Neurologie und Psychologie von 1459-1799. 3 vols.

Berlin: G. Reimer, 1900.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY , NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology, PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, PSYCHOLOGY › History of Psychology
  • 5005.1

Hypnosis: Its history, practice and theory.

London: Grant Richards, 1903.

An unexcelled “scholarly, critical, and detailed analysis of hypnosis” (Bliss).



Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, PSYCHOTHERAPY › Hypnosis, PSYCHOTHERAPY › Hypnosis › History of Psychotherapy: Hypnosis
  • 5006

The institutional care of the insane in the United States and Canada. Edited by Henry M. Hurd. 4 vols.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 19161917.

Hurd was Professor of Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University. The work includes his history of American psychiatry. Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , HOSPITALS, HOSPITALS › History of Hospitals, PSYCHIATRY, PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 5007

Hundert Jahre Psychiatrie.

Z. ges. Neurol. 38, 161-275, 1918.

English translation, New York, 1962.



Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 5008

A glimpse into the history of the surgery of the brain.

London: Macmillan, 1922.

Thomas Vicary Lecture. First published in Lancet, 1922, 1, 111-16, 165-72.



Subjects: NEUROSURGERY › History of Neurosurgery
  • 5010

Les malades de l’esprit et leurs médecins du XVIe siècle. Les étapes des connaissances psychiatriques de la Renaissance à Pinel.

Paris: Maloine, 1930.


Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, Renaissance Medicine › History of Renaissance Medicine
  • 5012

Les pionniers de la psychiatrie française avant et après Pinel. 2 vols.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1930.

A history of French psychiatry from Fernel to the end of the 19th century, focused around the work of each pioneer. Semelaigne was the great grand-nephew of Pinel.



Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 5013

A history of medical psychology.

New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 1941.


Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 5014

Studies in reflexes. History, psychology, synthesis and nomenclature.

Arch. Neurol. Psychiat., 51, 113-33, 414; 52, 341-58, 359-82, 1944.

Also published in book form, Chicago, 1945.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology
  • 5015

The falling sickness: A history of epilepsy from the Greeks to the beginnings of modern neurology. Second edition.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1945.

Revised second edition. Baltimore, 1971.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › Epilepsy, NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology
  • 5015.1

The mentally ill in America. A history of their care and treatment from colonial times. Second edition, revised and enlarged.

New York: Columbia University Press, 1949.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, PSYCHOLOGY › History of Psychology
  • 5016

Bibliography of electroencephalography, 1875-1948. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology, Suppl. No. 1

1950.

Covers both normal and disease states. Suppl. No. 23 (1964), ed. M. Fink, covers the period 1951-62.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Subjects, NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology, PHYSIOLOGY › Electrophysiology › Electroencephalography, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 5017

A history of neurological surgery. Edited by A. Earl Walker.

Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins, 1951.

Includes a bibliography of nearly 2,400 references, nearly all of which are secondary sources.



Subjects: NEUROSURGERY › History of Neurosurgery
  • 5018

The history and development of neurological surgery.

New York: Paul B. Hoeber, 1952.


Subjects: NEUROSURGERY › History of Neurosurgery
  • 5019

Grosse Nervenärzte. 3 vols.

Stuttgart: G. Thieme, 19561963.


Subjects: NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology
  • 5019.1

A history of neurology.

New York: M. D. Publications, 1959.


Subjects: NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology
  • 5019.10

Foundations of hypnosis, from Mesmer to Freud.

Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas, 1970.

Readings, including translations, from classic texts, with commentary.



Subjects: Mesmerism, NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology
  • 5019.11

The classical brain stem syndromes. Translations of the original papers with notes on the evolution of clinical neuroanatomy.

Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas, 1971.


Subjects: NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology
  • 5019.12

Psychiatry for the poor. 1851 Colney Hatch Asylum: Friem Hospital 1973. A medical and social history.

London: Dawsons , 1974.

This is in effect a history of institutional psychiatry in Britain to time of writing.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 5019.13

Breakthroughs in hypothalamic and pituitary research. In: Integrative hypothalamic activity, editors D.F. Swaab and J.P. Schadé.

Progess in brain research, 41, 1-60, 1974.


Subjects: NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 5019.14

Neurological classics in modern translation.

New York: Hafner, 1977.

Full translations of 20 classic European contributions to 19th and 20th century neurology.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology
  • 5019.15

A centennial bibliography of Huntington’s chorea, 1872-1972.

Leuven (Louvain), Belgium: University Press, The Hague, Nijhoff, 1974.

Over 2,000 references to original works. Chronological arrangement. Author, geographic and other indexes. With F. Baro and N. C. Myrianthopoulos.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Diseases, GENETICS / HEREDITY › HEREDITARY / CONGENITAL DISEASES OR DISORDERS › Inherited Neurological Disorders › Huntington's Chorea, NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology, NEUROLOGY › Movement Disorders › Chorea
  • 5019.16

The roots of psychology. A sourcebook in the history of ideas.

New York: Basic Books, 1974.


Subjects: PSYCHOLOGY › History of Psychology
  • 5019.17

World history of psychiatry. Edited by J.G. Howells.

New York: Brunner/ Mazel, 1975.

Contributions by 42 authors.



Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 5019.18

The doctrine of the nerves. Chapters in the history of neurology.

Oxford: University Press, 1981.

Deals with the structure, function, and diseases of the nervous system to the end of the 19th century.



Subjects: NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology
  • 5019.19

La maladie de l’âme. Étude sur la relation de l’âme et du corps dans la tradition médico-philosophique antique.

Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1981.


Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 5019.2

The historical development of British psychiatry. Vol. 1. (All published.)

Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1961.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 5019.20

Neurosurgical giants: Feet of clay and iron.

New York: Elsevier, 1985.

Brief biographical essays by various authors, edited by Bucy. The companion volume, Modern neurosurgical giants (1986) includes articles on living neurosurgeons, written by colleagues. Neither volume includes bibliographies.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works), NEUROSURGERY › History of Neurosurgery
  • 5019.21

Animal magnetism, early hypnotism, and psychical research, 1766-1925. An annotated bibliography.

White Plains, NY: Kraus International, 1988.

Describes 1905 works, mostly with detailed annotations.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Subjects, Mesmerism, PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, PSYCHOTHERAPY › Hypnosis › History of Psychotherapy: Hypnosis
  • 5019.22

The founders of child neurology. Edited by Stephen Ashwal.

San Francisco, CA: Norman Publishing in association with the Child Neurology Society, 1990.

125 biographical essays, with portraits and bibliographies, documenting the history of child neurology from the 17th century to the present.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works), NEUROLOGY › Child Neurology, NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology
  • 5019.3

Three hundred years of psychiatry, 1535-1860: A history presented in selected English texts.

London: Oxford University Press, 1963.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 5019.4

Psychoanalysis, psychology and literature: A bibliography.

Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1963.

Contains 4,460 references.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Subjects, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology, PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, PSYCHOLOGY, Psychoanalysis
  • 5019.5

Neurosurgical classics. Compiled by Robert H. Wilkins.

New York: Johnson Reprint Corporation, 1965.

A collection of 52 classic contributions to neurosurgery, translated, where necessary, into English, with an appendix containing over 200 additional references related to the historical development of neurological surgery.



Subjects: NEUROSURGERY › History of Neurosurgery
  • 5019.6

The history of psychiatry: An evaluation of psychiatric thought and practice from prehistoric times to the present.

New York: Harper & Row, 1966.


Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 5019.7

A history of the treatment of speech disorders.

Edinburgh: E. & S. Livingstone Ltd., 1968.


Subjects: NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology
  • 5019.8

Garrison’s History of neurology. Revised and enlarged with a bibliography of classical, original and standard works in neurology.

Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas, 1969.

A comprehensive, well-illustrated history of the subject, considerably enlarging Garrison’s work previously published in C. L. Dana’s Textbook of nervous diseases, 1925, pp. xv-lvi.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Subjects, NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology
  • 5019.9

The founders of neurology. One hundred and forty-six biographical sketches by eighty-nine authors. Compiled and 2nd edition.

Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas, 1970.

Neuroanatomists, neurophysiologists, neuropathologists, clinical neurologists and neurosurgeons are included. 1st ed., 1953, had 133 biographies; 2nd ed. has 146, 34 of which have been added. Because the 2nd edition deleted certain biographies, readers should also consult the 1st edition.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works), NEUROLOGY › History of Neurology
  • 2464
  • 5020

Diatribae duae medico-philosophicae, quarum prior agit de fermentatione sive de motu intestino particularum in quovis corpore, altera de febribus sive de motu earundum in sanguine animalium.

London: T. Roycroft, 1659.

Includes (De febribus, cap. X, XIV) first description of epidemic typhoid. English translation in his Practice of physick, 1684, Treatise II, 83-98, 1111-18.

Contains the earliest suggestion that fermentation is an intestinal or internal motion of particles; the analogy between putrefaction and fermentation is also noted.

 



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever, MICROBIOLOGY, Zymology (Zymurgy) (Fermentation)
  • 5021

De morbo mucoso.

Göttingen: V. Bossiegel, 1762.

An exhaustive study of typhoid, which the writers confused with dysentery and relapsing fever.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever
  • 5022

A practical essay on typhous fever.

New York: E. Bliss & E. White, 1824.

Nathan Smith left a classic account of typhoid; this was reprinted in Med. Classics, 1937, 1, 781-819 He clearly recognized the contagious nature of the disease.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever
  • 5023

Recherches anatomiques, pathologiques et thérapeutiques sur la maladie connue sous les noms de gastro-entérite; fièvre putride, adynamique, ataxique, typhoïde, etc. 2 vols.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1829.

Louis introduced the term “typhoid fever” in reference to the disturbed mental condition of the patient; he first described the lenticular rose spots. His book established the pathological picture of the disease. English translation, Boston, 1836.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever
  • 5023.1

Observations on continued fever, as it occurs in the city of Glasgow hospitals.

Edinb. med. surg. J., 45, 64-70, 1836.

Perry correctly described many of the distinctions between typhus and typhoid.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5024

On the typhus fever which occurred at Philadelphia in the spring and summer of 1836; illustrated by clinical observations at the Philadelphia Hospital; showing the distinction between this form of disease and dothinenteritis, the typhoid fever with alteration of the follicles of the small intestine.

Amer J. med. Sci., 19, 289-322; 20, 289-322, 1837.

Gerhard, a pupil of Louis, correctly differentiated between typhus and typhoid. Part of his paper is reproduced in R. H. Major, Classic descriptions of disease, 3rd ed., 1945, p. 174.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5025

Some considerations on the nature and pathology of typhus and typhoid fever, applied to the solution of the question of the identity or non-identity of the two diseases.

Edinb. med. surg. J., 54, 289-339, 1840.

Typhoid and typhus were often confused. Stewart made a careful analysis of a number of cases of both fevers and clearly demonstrated that there were in Britain two distinct fevers – typhoid and typhus.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5026

Practical remarks on the continued fevers of Great Britain, and on the generic distinctions between enteric fever and typhus.

Monthly J. med. Sci., 7, 347-58, 18461847.

Introduction of the term “enteric fever”, a term for typhoid.  Ritchie carefully differentiated the symptoms of typhus and typhoid.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5027

On typhoid and typhus fevers, – an attempt to determine the question of their identity or non-identity, by an analysis of the symptoms, and of the appearances found after death in 66 fatal cases observed at the London Fever Hospital from Jan. 1847–Feb. 1849.

Monthly J. med. Sci., 9, 663-80, 1849.

Despite Stewart’s work, there was still controversy as to the identity of typhoid and typhus. Jenner’s paper demonstrated that the etiology of the two was quite different, that one did not communicate or protect against the other, and that epidemics of the two did not prevail simultaneously.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5028

Die Hydrotherapie des Typhus.

Stettin (Szczecin), Poland: T. von der Nahmer, 1861.

Brand’s cold bath treatment of typhoid fever consisted of total immersion in water at 65°F. and the pouring of cold water over the neck and shoulders. The cold bath treatment of fevers was instituted by Currie (see No. 1988).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus, THERAPEUTICS › Balneotherapy, THERAPEUTICS › Hydrotherapy
  • 5029

Typhoid fever; its nature, mode of spreading, and prevention.

London: Longmans, Green & Co., 1873.

Budd insisted that typhoid fever was spread by contagion and established the fact that infection with typhoid came from the dejecta of the patients; he strengthened the theory of water-born infection. See also his earlier papers in Lancet, 1856, 2, 617, 694; 1859, 2, (several papers); 1860, 1, (several papers).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever
  • 5030

Die Organismen in den Organen bei Typhus abdominalis.

Virchows Arch. path. Anat., 81, 58-74, 1880.

Salmonella typhi, causal organism of typhoid, was discovered by Eberth. Some European writers refer to the disease as “Eberth’s disease”.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Salmonella, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever
  • 5031

Der Bacillus des Abdominaltyphus und dertyphöse Process.

Arch exp. Path. Pharmak., 13, 381-460, 1881.

Klebs probably saw the typhoid bacillus before Eberth, reporting it later.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Salmonella › Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever
  • 5032

Zur Aetiologie des Abdominaltyphus.

Mitt. k. GesundhAmte, 2, 372-420, 1884.

Gaffky was the first to grow pure cultures of Salmonella typhi; he showed it to be the true activator of the disease. English translation, New Sydenham Society, 1886. Digital facsimile of the 1884 printing from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Salmonella › Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever
  • 5033

Untersuchungen über Typhus abdominalis.

Münch med. Wschr., 35, 315-18, 1888.

Salmonella typhi first demonstrated in the gall-bladder in cases of typhoid.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever
  • 5034

De l’immunité contre le virus de la fièvre typhoöde conférée par des substances solubles.

Ann. Inst. Pasteur, 2, 54-59, 1888.

Experimental antityphoid inoculation.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever
  • 5035

Infections paratyphoïdiques.

Bull. Soc. méd Hôp. Paris, 3 sér., 13, 820-33, 1896.

Isolation of Salmonella paratyphi B. First use of the term “paratyphoid fever”.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Paratyphoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis
  • 2549
  • 5036

Eine neue Methode zur raschen Erkennung des Choleravibrio und des Typhusbacillus.

Münch, med. Wschr., 43, 285-86, 1896.

The discovery of bacterial agglutination. Gruber and Durham discovered the agglutinating action of the serum of typhoid patients upon the typhoid bacillus. First briefly reported by Durham: On a special action of serum of highly immunized animals, and its use for diagnostic and other purposes. Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond., 1986, 59, 224-26.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Salmonella › Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhi , IMMUNOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever
  • 2550
  • 5037

Recherches de la réaction agglutinante dans le sang et le sérum desséchés des typhiques et dans la sérosité des vesicatoires.

Bull. Mém. Soc. méd. Hôp. Paris, 3 sér., 13, 681-82, 1896.

Developing the work of Gruber and Durham, Widal noted that a patient’s serum could be tested with bacteria of known type and his disease identified by this means. They demonstrated specific agglutinins in the blood of typhoid patients, making possible an agglutination reaction for the diagnosis of typhoid, the“Gruber-Widal test”.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever, Laboratory Medicine › Blood Tests
  • 5038

On infection with a para-colon bacillus in a case with all the clinical features of typhoid fever.

Johns Hopk. Hosp. Bull., 9, 54-56, 1898.

Isolation of Salmonella paratyphi A.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Salmonella, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Paratyphoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis
  • 5039

Remarks on the results which have been obtained by the antityphoid inoculations.

Brit. med. J., 1, 122-29, 1900.

The active inoculation of man against typhoid was first performed by Wright in 1896. For a preliminary note see Lancet, 1896, 2, 807.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever
  • 5040

Die Bekämpfung des Typhus.

Berlin: A. Hirschwald, 1903.

The prophylactic measures for the control of typhus suggested by Koch have been adopted almost everywhere.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus, PUBLIC HEALTH
  • 5041

Weitere Mitteilungen über Schweinepest mit besonderer Berücksichtigung der Bakteriologie der Hogcholeragruppe.

Zbl. Bakt., 1 Abt., 42, Beilage, 127-38, 1908.

First description of Salmonella paratyphi C.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Salmonella, VETERINARY MEDICINE, VETERINARY MEDICINE › Epizootics
  • 5042

The control of typhoid in the Army by vaccination.

N. Y. State J. Med., 10, 535-48, 1910.

Russell carried out important and long-continued investigations on anti-typhoid vaccination in the U.S. Army, demonstrating beyond question its value in selected groups. The war of 1914-18 confirmed the value of the work of Wright and Russell.

"In 1908, Surgeon General O'Reilly sent Russell to England to observe the work of Sir Almroth Wright, Professor at the Royal Army Medical College, who had been experimenting with a method of prophylaxis with killed culture of typhoid organisms to immunize against the disease. Upon Russell's return, he submitted a report on Wright's research, which O'Reilly considered "a very valuable treatise on the epidemiology of this disease". He conducted trials at the Army Medical Museum comparing the efficacy of both an orally administered and an injected vaccine. He packed the vaccine in small single dosage using small glass ampoules which, unlike the 1 liter flasks used in the United Kingdom, ensured that all of the typhoid micro-organisms were killed.[1]  (Wikipedia article on Frederick F. Russell, accessed 5-2020).



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever
  • 5043

Ueber die Behandlung von Typhus mit Milchinjektionen.

Wien Klin. Wschr., 29, 1043-45, 1916.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Lice-Borne Diseases › Typhus
  • 5044

A new generation of paratyphoid.

Lancet, 1, 296-97, 1919.

Hirszfeld gave an important description of Salmonella paratyphi C. (“Hirszfeld’s bacillus”).



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Salmonella, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Paratyphoid Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis
  • 5044.1

Der heutige Stand der Paratyphusforschung.

Zbl. ges. Hyg., 25, 273-311, 1931.

Kauffmann–White classification of Salmonella based on antigenic structure. For historical note, including the part played by P. B. White, see J. Hyg. (camb), 1934, 34, 335.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Salmonella, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis
  • 5045

A new antigen of B. typhosus. Its relation to virulence and to active and passive immunisation.

Lancet, 2, 186-91, 1934.

Vi antigens first described.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 5045.1

The preparation of anti-typhoid serum in the horse for therapeutic use in man.

J. Hyg. (Camb.), 38, 673-82, Cambridge, England, 1938.

Typhoid antiserum.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Salmonellosis › Typhoid Fever
  • 22
  • 2433
  • 3162
  • 3163
  • 3612
  • 3925
  • 4484
  • 4510
  • 4808
  • 4915
  • 5046
  • 5089
  • 5146

Тα ∑ωζομενα. The extant works of Aretaeus, the Cappadocian. Edited and translated by Francis Adams.

London: Sydenham Society, 1856.

Aretaeus left many fine descriptions of disease; in fact Garrison ranks him second only to Hippocrates in this respect. In the printed editions of this bibliography, before the present online version, the Adams edition was cited no less than 12 times for individual diseases, plus its first citation in "Collected Works" (No. 22.) This number of citations is, of course, greater than any other specific work by any other author, though the number of citations may be a reflection of idiosyncracies of the compilers rather than a proportionate measure of the significance of Aretaeus in the history of medicine. The citations are as follows:

 

3162. On angina, or quinsey. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams, 249-52, 404-07.

3163. On pleurisy. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams, 255-58, 410-16.

2433. On elephas, or elephantiasis. In his Extant works, ed. by F. Adams, 366-73, 494-98. Classic description of “elephantiasis Aretaei”, nodous leprosy.

5046. On ulcerations about the tonsils. In hiis Extant works, ed. F. Adams, 253-55. Aretaeus’s description of ulcerations about the tonsils, which he called “ulcera Syrica”, clearly referred to diphtheria, of which it was the first unmistakable description. For his treatment of the disease, see pp. 409-10 of the same work.

5089. On dysentery. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams. 353-57. Prior to Lösch’s discovery of E. histolytica, all forms of dysentery were differentiated only on clinical grounds.

4915. Extant works. Ed. F. Adams. Aretaeus wrote important accounts of melancholy (298-300, 473-78) and madness (301-04).

5146. On tetanus. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams,  246-49, 400-04. Aretaeus left a full account of tetanus.

4484,  On arthritis and sciatica. In his Extant works, ed. by F. Adams,  362-65, 492-93,

3612. On jaundice, or icterus. In his Extant works, ed F. Adams, 324-28.

4510. On paralysis. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams.

4808. On epilepsy, in his Extant works, ed F. Adams,  243, 296, 399, 468. Aretaeus was well acquainted with hemi-epilepsy from local injury in the opposite half of the brain; partly from this knowledge he formulated the “decussation in the form of the letter X” of the motor path. He first described epilepsy resulting from a depressed fracture of the skull. In his excellent description he made the first mention of the aura.

3925. On diabetes.In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams. 338-40, 485-86. The first accurate account of diabetes, to which Aretaeus gave its present name; he insisted on the part which thirst plays in the symptomatology. 

According to the Wikipedia article on Headache, Aretaeus also provied the first recorded classification system for headaches: "He made a distinction between three different types of headache: i) cephalalgia, by which he indicates a shortlasting, mild headache; ii) cephalea, referring to a chronic type of headache; and iii) heterocrania, a paroxysmal headache on one side of the head." 

Digital facsimile of Adams's Greek and Latin edition from the Internet Archive at this link.

 



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, Collected Works: Opera Omnia, HEPATOLOGY › Diseases of the Liver, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Bacillary Dysentery, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leprosy, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Tetanus, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Lymphatic Filariasis (Elephantiasis), Medicine: General Works, Metabolism & Metabolic Disorders › Diabetes, NEUROLOGY › Chronic Pain › Headache, NEUROLOGY › Chronic Pain › Sciatica, NEUROLOGY › Epilepsy, NEUROLOGY › Paralysis, PSYCHIATRY, RESPIRATION › Respiratory Diseases, RHEUMATOLOGY › Arthritis
  • 1673
  • 5047
  • 5085

Epidemiorum et ephemeridum libri duo.

Paris: J. Quesnel, 1640.

A pupil of Fernel, De Baillou was a follower of Hippocrates in his advancement of the doctrine of “epidemic constitutions”. Crookshank regards him as the first modern epidemiologist. This work includes the first description of whooping cough. This was originally written in 1578. Baillou called it “tussis quintana”. For translation see R. H. Major, Classic descriptions of disease, 3rd ed., 1945, p. 210.  The above work includes a description of the epidemic of diphtheria in Paris, 1576. Later de Baillou advocated tracheotomy, although there is no evidence that he performed that operation.

 

 



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Whooping Cough
  • 5048

Account of the operation of bronchotome, as it was performed at St. Andrews.

Phil. Trans., 36, 448-55, 1730.

Martine was the first to perform tracheotomy for diphtheria.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5049
  • 5077

An account of the sore throat attended with ulcers.

London: C. Davis, 1748.

First authoritative account of both diphtheria and scarlatinal angina, although failing to differentiate between the two conditions. Reprinted in Med. Classics, 1940, 5, 58-99.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever
  • 5050

A dissertation on the malignant, ulcerous sore-throat.

London: J. Hinton, 1757.

Huxham’s reputation rests mainly on his Essays on fevers, but he also left an excellent account of diphtheria. Although he failed to differentiate the disease from scarlatinal angina, he was the first to observe the paralysis of the soft palate.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever
  • 5051

An enquiry into the nature, cause, and cure of the croup.

Edinburgh: Kincaid & Bell, 1765.

First clear and complete clinical description of diphtheria.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5052

An enquiry into the nature, cause and cure of the angina suffocativa, or sore throat distemper, as it is commonly called by the inhabitants of this city and colony.

New York: S. Inslee, & A. Car, 1771.

One of the earliest accurate descriptions of diphtheria. Osler considered the book “an American classic of the first rank”.

Bard was personal physician to George Washington.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5053

Des inflammations spéciales du tissu muqueux et en particulier de la diphthérite, ou inflammation pelliculaire.

Paris: Crevot, 1826.

Bretonneau showed that croup, malignant angina, and “scorbutic gangrene of the gums” were all the same disease, for which he suggested the term dipntheritis, later substituting “dipnthérite”. He performed (pp. 300-38) tracheotomy for croup. English translation in New Sydenham Society’s Memoirs on diphtheria, London, 1859.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5054

Mémoire sur un cas de trachéotomie pratiquée dans la période extréme de croup.

J. Connaiss. méd.-chir., 1, 5, 41, 1833.

Trousseau popularized tracheotomy.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5055

Ueber Diphtherie.

Verh. Congr. inn. Med., 2, 139-54, 1883.

First account of Corynebacterium diphtheriae (Klebs–Loeffler bacillus), causal organism in diphtheria, discovered by Klebs.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Corynebacterium diphtheriae, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5056

Untersuchungen über die Bedeutung der Mikroorganismen für die Entstehung der Diphtherie beim Menschen, bei der Taube und beim Kalbe.

K. Ges. -Amt., 2, 421-99, 1884.

Loeffler succeeded in cultivating C. diphtheriae, the diphtheria bacillus. He reproduced the characteristic membrane by swabbing the mucous membranes of various animals with pure cultures of the bacillus.
In this paper Loeffler, who was working as one of Koch's assistants, stated on p. 424 three postulates similar to Koch's 4 postulates:
1. The organisms must be shown to be constantly present in characteristic form and arrangement in the diseased tissue.
2. The organisms which, from their behavior appear to be responsible for the disease, must be isolated and cultivated in purity.
3. The pure cultures must be shown to induce disease experimentally.

D. Jay Grimes, "Koch's postulates- then and now," Microbe 1 (2006) 223-228.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Corynebacterium diphtheriae, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › GENERAL PRINCIPLES of Infection by Microorganisms
  • 5057

Intubation of the larynx.

N.Y. med. J., 42, 145-47, 1885.

O’Dwyer perfected the operation of laryngeal intubation in croup.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5059

Contribution a l’étude de la diphtérie.

Ann. Inst. Pasteur, 2, 629-61; 3, 273-88; 4, 385-426, Paris, 18881889, 1890.

Confirmation of the work of Loeffler and demonstration of the exotoxin. This work is the starting point of the development of an immunizing serum.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 2544
  • 5060
  • 5150

Ueber das Zustandekommen der Diphtherie-Immunität und der Tetanus-Immunität bei Thieren.

Dtsch. med. Wschr., 16, 1113-14, 1890.

Antitoxins and their immunizing powers were discovered when Behring and Kitasato published their paper dealing with immunity to tetanus and diphtheria. This work laid the foundation of all future treatment with antitoxins, and was the basis of serotherapy. The paper was reprinted in the same journal, 1940, 66, 1348-49. Part 2, which deals with diphtheria, is by Behring alone. Behring was the first recipient (1901) of the Nobel Prize for Medicine. English translation in Bibel, Milestones in immunology (1988).

 



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Toxin-Antitoxin, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Tetanus
  • 5060.1

Immunisirungsversuche bei Diphtherie.

Berl. klin. Wschr., 27, 1133-35, 1890.

Artificial immunity to diphtheria produced in guinea-pigs by injection of attenuated cultures of the bacillus. Fraenkel's account appeared one day before the  paper of Behring and Kitasato. Behring, Die Geschichte der Diphtherie, recounts the history.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5061

The histological changes in experimental diphtheria.

Johns Hopk. Hosp. Bull., 2, 107-10; 3, 17-18, 1891, 1892.

An account of the pathological changes brought about by experimental inoculation of diphtheria toxins.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5062

Die Behandlung der Diphtherie mit Diphtherieheilserum.

Dtsch. med. Wschr., 19, 543-47; 20, 645-46, 1893, 1894.

In 1890 Behring and Kitasato discovered the diphtheria and tetanus antitoxins (see No. 5060). The above papers deal more fully with the use of the diphtheria antitoxin.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Toxin-Antitoxin, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5063

Contribution à l’étude de la diphtérie (sérum thérapie).

Ann. Inst. Pasteur, 8, 609-39, 1894.

Roux and Martin demonstrated the value of Behring’s specific antitoxin in the treatment of human diphtheria, and showed how it could be produced on a large scale.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Toxin-Antitoxin, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5064

Die Wertbestimmung des Diphtherieheilserums.

Klin. jb., 6, 299-326, 1897.

Ehrlich improved Behring’s diphtheria antitoxin through quantitative titration and established an international standard for this and other antitoxins. This was the beginning of the concept of biological standardization. The first exposition of Ehrlich’s side-chain theory appeared in this paper. Abridged English translation in Bibel, Milestones in immunology (1988).



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Toxin-Antitoxin, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5065

Kutanreaktion beil Impfung mit Diphtherietoxin.

Münch, med. Wschr., 55, 504-06, 1908.

The Schick test for the determination of susceptibility to diphtheria.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, Laboratory Medicine › Diagnostic Skin Tests
  • 5066

Die Diphtherietoxin – Hautreaktion des Menschen als Vorprobe der prophylaktischen Diphtherieheilseruminjektion.

Münch. med. Wschr., 60, 2608-10, 1913.

Schick developed his test for use as an indication as to whether or not prophylactic injections of antitoxin are necessary in children already exposed to diphtheria. English translation in J. Mt. Sinai Hosp., 1938, 5, 26-28.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Toxin-Antitoxin, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, Laboratory Medicine › Diagnostic Skin Tests
  • 5067

Ueber ein neues Diphtherieschutzmittel.

Dtsch. med. Wschr., 39, 873-76; 40, 1139, 1913, 1914.

Toxin–antitoxin for immunization against diphtheria.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Toxin-Antitoxin, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5068

Active immunization in diphtheria and treatment by toxin-antitoxin.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 63, 859-61, 1914.

With A. Zingher and M. H. Serota. Park was an early advocate of diphtheria immunization with toxin-antitoxin. A second paper is in the same journal, 1915, 65, 2216-20.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Toxin-Antitoxin, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5069

Ueber cutane Hautreaktion mittels Diphtherie-Toxin zum Nachweis der Diphtherie-Immunität.

Klin Wschr., 3, 1317-18, 1924.

The “scratch test”, a cutaneous reaction for determination of susceptibility to diphtheria.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, Laboratory Medicine › Diagnostic Skin Tests
  • 5070

L’anatoxine diphtérique. Ses propriétés–ses applications.

Ann. Inst. Pasteur, 42, 959-1009, 1928.

In 1923 Ramon so modified the diphtheria toxin with formaldehyde that it lost its toxic properties while retaining its antigenic virtues. This modified “anatoxin” (toxoid) superseded toxin–antitoxin as an immunizing agent against diphtheria. Preliminary paper in C. R. Soc. Biol. (Paris), 1923, 89, 2-4.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Toxin-Antitoxin, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5071

Insoluble precipitates in diphtheria and tetanus immunization.

Brit. med. J., 2, 244-45, 1930.

Alum-precipitated toxoid for active immunization.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Tetanus
  • 5072

On the existence of two forms of diphtheria bacillus B. diphtheria gravis and B. diphtheriae mitis.

J. Path. Bact., 34, 667-81, 1931.

J. S. Anderson, F. C. Happold, J. W. McLeod, and J. G. Thomson were the first to distinguish the gravis, mitis, and intermediate types of C. diphtheriae.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Corynebacterium diphtheriae, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria
  • 5073
  • 5437

De tumoribus praeter naturam.

Naples: Octavio Idusmadi, 1553.

This treatise on tumors includes (p. 194) the first known description of an epidemic disease resembling scarlet fever. This was a malady prevalent in Italy, and was commonly called rossania or rossalia. Ingrassia was first to differentiate varicella (chicken pox) from scarlet fever (pp. 194-95). Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Chickenpox, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever, ONCOLOGY & CANCER
  • 5074

De febribus libri IV.

Venice: F. Baba, 1641.

Sennert gave the first scientific description of scarlet fever. He was the first to mention the scarlatinal desquamation, the early arthritis, and post-scarlatinal edema, but made no mention of sore throat.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever
  • 2198
  • 5075
  • 5441.1

Observationes medicae circa morborum acutorum historiamet curationem.

London: G. Kettilby, 1676.

Sydenham recorded significant observations on dysentery, scarlet fever (p. 387), scarlatina, measles and other conditions. He stressed the clinical study of medicine and kept careful case records. Includes (pp. 272-80) the most minute and careful description of measles that had so far appeared; this is reprinted in Med. Classics, 1939, 4, 313-19.

English translation in No. 64 and prior English editions. The above book is really a third edition of his Methodus curandi febres, 1666; second edition, 1668. The Latin texts of both editions of Methodus curandi were reprinted, with Latham’s translation, an introduction and notes by G.G. Meynell, Folkstone, Winterdoum Books, 1987.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Dysentery, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever, Medicine: General Works
  • 5076

The practical history of a new epidemical eruptive miliary fever, with an angina ulcusculosa, which prevailed in Boston New England in the years 1735 and 1736.

Boston, MA: N. E., T. Fleet, 1736.

Douglass left the first adequate clinical description of scarlet fever, which he called angina ulcusculosa, in his account of New England’s first scarlet fever epidemic. He was one of the first American physicians to hold the M.D.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northeast, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 5049
  • 5077

An account of the sore throat attended with ulcers.

London: C. Davis, 1748.

First authoritative account of both diphtheria and scarlatinal angina, although failing to differentiate between the two conditions. Reprinted in Med. Classics, 1940, 5, 58-99.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever
  • 5078

Opera medico-physica in quatuor tractatus digesta.

Vienna: J. T. Trattner, 1762.

Plenciz was the first to grasp the significance of Leeuwenhoek’s animalculae for the etiology of contagious disease. Part III of the above is concerned with scarlatina.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever
  • 5079

An account of the scarlet fever and sore throat, or scarlatina anginosa; particularly as it appeared at Birmingham in the year 1778.

London: T. Cadell, 1779.

Withering, best remembered for his book on the foxglove, described the epidemics of scarlet fever which occurred in England in 1771 and 1778.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever
  • 5080

Report on a disease of cows prevailing at a farm from which scarlatina had been distributed along with the milk of cows.

15th Ann. Rep. Local Govt. Bd., Suppl. containing Report of the Medical Officer for 1885, pp. 90-110, 1886.

Contains the first suggestion of the streptococcal origin of scarlet fever.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Streptococcus , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever, VETERINARY MEDICINE
  • 5080.1

Sur la pathogénie de la scarlatine.

C. R. Soc. Biol. (Paris), 45, 1012-14, 1893.

Bergé stated all the essential facts concerning the aetiology of scarlet fever, and definitely attributed its cause to a streptococcus. He published a thesis on the subject in 1895.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever
  • 5081

Serologische Beobachtungen am Scharlachexanthem.

Z. Kinderheilk., Orig., 17, 328-33, 1918.

Schultz–Charlton reaction.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever, Laboratory Medicine › Diagnostic Skin Tests
  • 5082

A skin test for susceptibility to scarlet fever.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 82, 265-66, 1924.

The “Dick test” for the determination of individual susceptibility to scarlet fever.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Streptococcus , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever, Laboratory Medicine › Diagnostic Skin Tests, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 5082.1

The etiology of scarlet fever.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 82, 301-02, 1924.

Proof that streptococcus is the cause of scarlet fever.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Streptococcus , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 5083

A scarlet fever antitoxin.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 82, 1246-47, 1924.

Following their successful attempts to establish individual susceptibility to scarlet fever, these workers prepared an antitoxin for immunization.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Toxin-Antitoxin, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 5084

The significance of Streptococcus hemolyticus in scarlet fever and the preparation of a specific anti-scarlatinal serum by immunization of the horse to Streptococcus hemolyticus-scarlatinae.

J. Amer. med. Assoc., 82, 542-44, 1924.

Dochez and Sherman immunized a horse by repeated injections of scarlet fever toxin. A serum obtained from the horse blanched a scarlet fever rash and, when injected subcutaneously, caused marked amelioration of the early symptoms. They also confirmed the relation of streptococci to scarlet fever.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Toxin-Antitoxin, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Scarlet Fever, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 1673
  • 5047
  • 5085

Epidemiorum et ephemeridum libri duo.

Paris: J. Quesnel, 1640.

A pupil of Fernel, De Baillou was a follower of Hippocrates in his advancement of the doctrine of “epidemic constitutions”. Crookshank regards him as the first modern epidemiologist. This work includes the first description of whooping cough. This was originally written in 1578. Baillou called it “tussis quintana”. For translation see R. H. Major, Classic descriptions of disease, 3rd ed., 1945, p. 210.  The above work includes a description of the epidemic of diphtheria in Paris, 1576. Later de Baillou advocated tracheotomy, although there is no evidence that he performed that operation.

 

 



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Whooping Cough
  • 3926
  • 5086

Pharmaceutice rationalis sive diatriba de medicamentorum operationibus in humano corpore. 2 vols.

London: Robert Scott & Oxford: e theatro Sheldoniano, 16741675.

Willis’s last work deals with the anatomy and physiology of the thoracic and abdominal organs, and contains the first description of the superficial lymphatics of the lungs, the first clinical and pathological account of emphysema, and a clear and accurate description of pertussis (whooping-cough). The book also contains the first distinction between diabetes mellitus, characterized by glycosuria, from diabetes insipidus, in which sugar is not present in the urine. Willis noted that psychogenic factors, such as grief or sadness, could bring on diabetes. The second volume, published posthumously, includes a life of the author.

Three versions of Willis’s book were published simultaneously: A quarto version with the imprint of the Sheldonian Theatre in Oxford, another quarto version with the London imprint of Robert Scott added, and a duodecimo edition

"Epidemiorum et ephemeridum libri duo, pars secunda" in vol. 2 contains (p. 99) a description of “puerorum tussis convulsiva, chincough dicta” – a clear account of whooping cough (Treatise IX, pt. 2, p. 38 of his Practice of physick, 1684).

 



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Whooping Cough, Metabolism & Metabolic Disorders › Diabetes
  • 5086.1

Treatise on the history, nature, and treatment of chincough: Including a variety of cases and dissections. To which is subjoined an inquiry into the relative mortality of the principal diseases of children, and the numbers who have died under ten years of age, in Glasgow, during the last thirty years.

Glasgow: John Smith & Son & London: Longman, Hurst..., 1813.

Probably the first book on whooping cough, written after two of Watt's children died from the disease. After vaccination for smallpox was introduced, Watt found, as he had expected, that the number of deaths from that disease was reduced, and he expected to find a relative reduction in pediatric mortality as a whole. However, he found that no such reduction had occur, as children continued to die from other diseases. This result placed him in direct conflict with advocates for vaccination who hoped to show that curing smallpox would reduce deaths overall. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Whooping Cough, PEDIATRICS
  • 5087

Le microbe de la coqueluche.

Ann. Inst. Pasteur, 20, 731-41; 21, 720-26, 1906, 1907.

The cocco-bacillus Haemophilus pertussis, commonly regarded as the causal organism of whooping cough, was at first named “Bordet–Gengou bacillus” after its discoverers. It has later renamed Bordetella pertussis.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Bordetella petussis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Whooping Cough
  • 5087.1

The phases of Haemophilus pertussis.

J. Hyg. (Camb.), 31, 423-34, 1931.

Leslie and Gardner classified H. pertussis cultures into four types and established an experimental basis for the development of an effective vaccine.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Haemophilus, IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Whooping Cough
  • 5087.2

A study in active immunization against pertussis.

Amer. J. Hyg., 29, Sect. B, 133-53, 1939.

Pertussis vaccine.



Subjects: IMMUNOLOGY › Immunization, IMMUNOLOGY › Vaccines, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Whooping Cough, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About
  • 5088

Der Keuchhusten.

Vienna: A. Hölder, 1896.

An important history of whooping cough.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › History of Infectious Disease, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Whooping Cough
  • 22
  • 2433
  • 3162
  • 3163
  • 3612
  • 3925
  • 4484
  • 4510
  • 4808
  • 4915
  • 5046
  • 5089
  • 5146

Тα ∑ωζομενα. The extant works of Aretaeus, the Cappadocian. Edited and translated by Francis Adams.

London: Sydenham Society, 1856.

Aretaeus left many fine descriptions of disease; in fact Garrison ranks him second only to Hippocrates in this respect. In the printed editions of this bibliography, before the present online version, the Adams edition was cited no less than 12 times for individual diseases, plus its first citation in "Collected Works" (No. 22.) This number of citations is, of course, greater than any other specific work by any other author, though the number of citations may be a reflection of idiosyncracies of the compilers rather than a proportionate measure of the significance of Aretaeus in the history of medicine. The citations are as follows:

 

3162. On angina, or quinsey. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams, 249-52, 404-07.

3163. On pleurisy. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams, 255-58, 410-16.

2433. On elephas, or elephantiasis. In his Extant works, ed. by F. Adams, 366-73, 494-98. Classic description of “elephantiasis Aretaei”, nodous leprosy.

5046. On ulcerations about the tonsils. In hiis Extant works, ed. F. Adams, 253-55. Aretaeus’s description of ulcerations about the tonsils, which he called “ulcera Syrica”, clearly referred to diphtheria, of which it was the first unmistakable description. For his treatment of the disease, see pp. 409-10 of the same work.

5089. On dysentery. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams. 353-57. Prior to Lösch’s discovery of E. histolytica, all forms of dysentery were differentiated only on clinical grounds.

4915. Extant works. Ed. F. Adams. Aretaeus wrote important accounts of melancholy (298-300, 473-78) and madness (301-04).

5146. On tetanus. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams,  246-49, 400-04. Aretaeus left a full account of tetanus.

4484,  On arthritis and sciatica. In his Extant works, ed. by F. Adams,  362-65, 492-93,

3612. On jaundice, or icterus. In his Extant works, ed F. Adams, 324-28.

4510. On paralysis. In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams.

4808. On epilepsy, in his Extant works, ed F. Adams,  243, 296, 399, 468. Aretaeus was well acquainted with hemi-epilepsy from local injury in the opposite half of the brain; partly from this knowledge he formulated the “decussation in the form of the letter X” of the motor path. He first described epilepsy resulting from a depressed fracture of the skull. In his excellent description he made the first mention of the aura.

3925. On diabetes.In his Extant works, ed. F. Adams. 338-40, 485-86. The first accurate account of diabetes, to which Aretaeus gave its present name; he insisted on the part which thirst plays in the symptomatology. 

According to the Wikipedia article on Headache, Aretaeus also provied the first recorded classification system for headaches: "He made a distinction between three different types of headache: i) cephalalgia, by which he indicates a shortlasting, mild headache; ii) cephalea, referring to a chronic type of headache; and iii) heterocrania, a paroxysmal headache on one side of the head." 

Digital facsimile of Adams's Greek and Latin edition from the Internet Archive at this link.

 



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, Collected Works: Opera Omnia, HEPATOLOGY › Diseases of the Liver, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Bacillary Dysentery, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Diphtheria, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leprosy, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Tetanus, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Lymphatic Filariasis (Elephantiasis), Medicine: General Works, Metabolism & Metabolic Disorders › Diabetes, NEUROLOGY › Chronic Pain › Headache, NEUROLOGY › Chronic Pain › Sciatica, NEUROLOGY › Epilepsy, NEUROLOGY › Paralysis, PSYCHIATRY, RESPIRATION › Respiratory Diseases, RHEUMATOLOGY › Arthritis
  • 5090

Von der Ruhr unter dem Volke im Jahr 1765.

Zürich: Fuessli & Co., 1767.

The first important monograph on bacillary dysentery. Translated into English by C. R. Hopson as A treatise on the dysentery, with a description of the epidemic dysentery that happened in Switzerland in the year 1765 (London, 1771). Digital facsimile of the 1767 edition from the Bayerische StaatsBibliothek at this link. Digital facsimile of the English translation from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Bacillary Dysentery
  • 5090.1

Sur les microbes de la dysentérie épidémique.

Bull. Acad. Méd. (Paris), 19, 522-29, 1888.

The dysentery bacillus was isolated by Chantemesse and Widal, although they failed to establish its etiological relationship to the disease.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Shigella , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Bacillary Dysentery
  • 5091

Ueber den Dysenteriebacillus (Bacillus dysenteriae).

Zbl. Bakt., 1 Abt., 24, 817-28, 870-74, 1898.

Discovery of the dysentery bacillus, Shigella. Preliminary paper in the same journal, 1898, 23, 599-600.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Shigella , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Bacillary Dysentery
  • 5092

Ueber die Ruhr als Volkskrankheit und ihren Erreger.

Dtsch. med. Wschr., 26, 637-39, 1900.

Further work on dysentery by Kruse led to the coupling of his name with Shiga to designate both the “Shiga–Kruse bacillus” and “Shiga–Kruse disease”.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Shigella , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Bacillary Dysentery
  • 5093

On the etiology of tropical dysentery.

Johns Hopk. Hosp. Bull., 11, 231-42, 1900.

The organism isolated by Flexner was at first thought to be identical with Shiga’s bacillus. Later Martini and Lentz, Z. Hyg., 1902, 41, 540, showed it to be different; it was named Bact. flexneri, and later Shigella flexneri.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Shigella , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Bacillary Dysentery
  • 5094

Ueber die Bakteriologie der giftarmen Dysenteriebacillen (Para-dysenteriebacillen).

Zbl. Bakt., 1 Abt., 75, Orig., 408-56, 1915.

Sonne’s bacillus (Shigella sonnei) was probably described earlier by others, but it was Sonne who first drew serious attention to it. First published as inaugural dissertation, 1914.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Shigella , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Bacillary Dysentery
  • 5095

Eine neuer Typus aus der Gruppe der Ruhrbazillen als Erreger einer grösseren Epidemie.

Z. Hyg. InfektKr., 84, 449-516, 1917.

Schmitz’s bacillus – Bact. ambiguum (Shigella schmitzii),a cause of dysentery.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Shigella , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Bacillary Dysentery
  • 5096

Sulfanilylguanidine in the treatment of acute bacillary dysentery in children.

Johns Hopk. Hosp. Bull., 68, 94-111, 1941.

E. K. Marshall, A. C. Bratton, L. B. Edwards, and E. L. Walker were the first to use sulphaguanidine in the treatment of bacillary dysentery.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Bacillary Dysentery, PEDIATRICS
  • 5097
  • 5330

Report on fever (Malta).

Army med. Dept, statist. Rep. (Lond.), (1861), 3, 486-521, 1863.

Marston wrote the first description of Malta fever as a distinct disease. He contracted the disease while serving in the Mediterranean area and described his own case.

Marston was apparently the first to describe “Weil’s disease” (p. 513).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Malta, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Brucellosis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leptospiroses
  • 5098

Note on the discovery of a micro-organism in Malta fever.

Practitioner, 39, 161-70, 1887.

Malta fever was shown by Bruce to be due to Micrococcus (Brucella) melitensis. The disease was later named Brucellosis.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus), BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria, BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Borrelia , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Malta, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Brucellosis
  • 5099

Die Aetiologie des seuchenhaften (“infectiösen”) Verwerfens.

Z. Thiermed., 1, 241-78, 1897.

Discovery of Brucella abortus.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Borrelia , INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Brucellosis