An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15423 entries, 13280 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 17, 2021

Browse by Entry Number 10900–10999

100 entries
  • 10900

Ehrlichia chaffeensis in Missouri ticks.

Amer. J. trop. Med. Hyg., 59, 641-643, 1998.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Roland, Everett, Cyr. Using PCR, the authors demonstrated that the tick Amblyoma americanum (the Lone Star Tick) was the insect vector of Ehrlichia chaffeensis. Digital facsimile from citeseerx.ist.psu.edu at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Ehrlichia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Ehrlichiosis, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Missouri, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 10901

Human granulocytic Ehrlichiosis in the Upper Midwest United States. A new species emerging?

J. Amer. Med. Assoc., 272, 212-218, 1994.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Bakken, Dumler, Chen. First description of the Ehrlichia ewingii species of Ehrlichiosis (HGE) from a patient in Duluth, Minnesota, though the infectious agent was not yet named. The authors stated that early treatment with doxyclycline provided the best chance of recovery.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Ehrlichia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Ehrlichiosis, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Minnesota
  • 10902

Ixodes dammini as a potential vector of human granulocytic Ehrlichiosis.

J. infect. Dis., 172, 1007-1012, 1995.

Order of authorship in the original paper was Pancholi,Kolbert, Mitchell. The authors provided convincing evidence that the tick Ixodes dammini is a common vector for the transmission of HGE (Ehrlichia ewingii).

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Ehrlichia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Ehrlichiosis
  • 10903

Ehrlichia ewingii, a newly recognized agent of human Ehrlichiosis.

New Eng. J. Med., 341, 148-155, 1999.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Buller, Arens, Hmiel. The authors confirmed that the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE), is Ehrlichia ewingii, a pathogen carried by dogs and known in that form as E. canis. Available from nejm.org at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Ehrlichia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Ehrlichiosis, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Missouri
  • 10904

Emergence of a new pathogenic Ehrlichia species, Wisconsin and Minnesota, 2009.

New Eng. J. Med., 365, 422-429, 2011.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Pritt, Sloan, Johnson. Discovery of a new species of Ehrlichia, initially denoted as "Wisconsin and Minnesota, 2009," that was not related to E. chaffeensiis or E. ewingii but is similar to E.muris. Digital text from PubMedCentral at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Ehrlichia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Ehrlichiosis, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Minnesota, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Wisconsin, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10905

Human infection with Ehrlichia muris-like pathogen, United States, 2007-2013.

New Eng. J. Med., 365, 422-429, 2015.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Johnson, Schiffman, Davis, Pritt. The authors, found some commonality in this pathogen, originally designated generally as "Wisconsin and Minnesota, 2009" with the mouse strain, and identified the vector of what appeared to be a new species as the Ixodes scapularis tick. Available from www.nc.cdc.gov at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Ehrlichia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Ehrlichiosis, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10906

Proposal to reclassify Ehrlichia muris as Ehrlichia muris subsp. muris subsp. nov. and description of Ehrlichia muris subsp. eauclairensis subsp. nov., a newly recognized tick borne pathogen of humans.

Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol., 67, 2121-2126, 2017.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Pritt, Allderdice, Sloan. By extremely complex genotyping methods and fine electron microscopic analysis of the organism, the authors showed that the infectious agent is a new human subspecies similar to the murine pathogen that is conveyed from the murine reservoirs to humans by the tick vector. The pathogen was named for Eau Claire, a city in Wisconsin, where the patient was infected. Full text available from PubMedCentral at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Ehrlichia, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Ehrlichiosis, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Wisconsin, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10907

Encylopedia of the black death.

Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2012.


Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 10908

De materia medica. Il Discoride di Napoli (Biblioteca Nazionale di Napoli - Ms ex-Vindobonense Greco 1, VI-VII sec d. C. 2 vols.

Sansepolcro: Aboca Museum Edizioni, 2013.

Translation into Italian of the text of the Naples Dioscorides, a 6-7th century illustrated manuscript. With color facsimiles of the original paintings in the manuscript, 243 modern drawings in color.  Foreword by Mauro Giancaspro and Valentino Mercati. Essays by Paolo Caputo, Paolo De Luca, Roberto De Lucia, Roberto Romano and Manuela De Matteis Tortora, Hans Walter Lack, Pietro Baraldi, Paolo Bensi and Alessandro Menghini. Afterword by Alain Touwaide. 243 Modern botanical images by Luca Massenzio Palermo.



Subjects: BOTANY, BOTANY › Botanical Illustration, BOTANY › Medical Botany, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 10909

A database for three Dioscoridean illustrated herbals.

HortScience, 49, 977-979, 2014.

"Abstract. An image database was developed for three illustrated recensions of the nonillustrated manuscript of Dioscorides entitled ... (De Materia Medica in Latin; On Medical Matters in English) written in approximately Year 65: Juliana Anicia Codex (JAC) or Codex Vindobonensis produced in Year 512, Codex Neapolitanus (NAP) produced in the late sixth or early seventh century, and Morgan 652 (M652) produced between 927 and 985. The database that brings up images and accompanying records is searchable by herbal, common name in English and Greek (Roman alphabet), binomial (current and in source document), and botanical family. In addition, a Venn diagram of images in the three herbals permits a search for images that are common or unique among the three herbals. The database makes it possible to locate images in herbals written in Greek that are difficult to access and will be useful to horticulturists and herbal scholars." The database is available at: https://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/pdfs/herbal-database-hortsci-v49-2014.pdf

 



Subjects: BOTANY › Botanical Illustration, BOTANY › History of Botany, BOTANY › Medical Botany, DIGITAL RESOURCES, PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines › History of Materia Medica, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10910

Emily Dickinson's herbarium: A facsimile edition. Foreward by Leslie A. Morris. Essays, botanical catalogue and index by Richard B. Sewall, Judith Farr, and Ray Angelo.

Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2006.

A facsimile edition of MS Am 1118.11 in Houghton Library, Harvard University. Digital facsimile of the actual herbarium from Harvard at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY, DIGITAL RESOURCES, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10911

Medicine in Iran: Profession, practice, and politics, 1800-1925.

New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Iran (Persia), POLITICS, MEDICAL, Persian (Iranian) Islamic Medicine › History of Persian (Iranian) Islamic Medicine
  • 10912

Novel virus related to Kaposi's Sarcoma associated herpesvirus from Colobus monkey.

Emerg. Infect. Dis., 25, 1548-1551, 2019.

Discovery of a new Karposi's Sarcoma virus in monkeys, named CbGHV1. Autopsy showed that the monkey died from a "primary effusion lymphoma" similar to the deaths of humans from human Karposi Sarcoma virus.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Kaposi's Sarcoma / HHV-8, ONCOLOGY & CANCER, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10913

Kaposi sarcoma in mantled guereza.

Emerg. Infect. Dis., 25, 1552-1555, 2019.

Order of authorship in original publication: Grewer, Bleyer, Matz-Rensing. Further work on the CBGHV1 (Colobine gammherpesvirus 1) which causes a pathology in the Colobus monkey very similar to that seen humans. 

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)

 



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Kaposi's Sarcoma / HHV-8, ONCOLOGY & CANCER, VIROLOGY, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10914

Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-like DNA sequences in AIDS-related body-cavity-based lymphomas.

New Eng. J. Med., 332, 1186-1191, 1995.

Chang, Moore and colleagues showed that the virus causing Kaposi's Sarcoma also causes body cavity lymphomas and  lymphomatous effusions in humans.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Kaposi's Sarcoma / HHV-8, ONCOLOGY & CANCER, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Herpesviridae › Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 10915

A new phlebovirus associated with severe febrile illness in Missouri.

New Eng. J. Med., 367, 834-841, 2012.

Order of authorship in the original paper: McMullan, Folk, Kelly. Discovery of a new Phlebovirus, which the authors name the "Heartland virus" and with high probability that Amblyoma is the tick vector. Digital facsimile from nejm.org at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Heartland Virus, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Missouri, VIROLOGY, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10916

A new segmented virus associated with human febrile illness in China.

New Eng. J. Med., 380, 2116-2125, 2019.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Wang, Ze-Dong; Wang, Bo; Wei, Feng. Discovery of a new tick-borne virus that the authors name the "Alongshan virus" (ALSV) in the family Flaviridae. Digital facsimile from nejm.org at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Alongshan Virus, VIROLOGY
  • 10917

Novel thogotovirus associated with febrile illness and death, United States, 2014.

Emerg. Infect. Dis., 21, 760-64, 2015.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Kosoy, Lambert, Hawkinson, Staples. Discovery of a new tick-borne Thogotovirus named by the authors "Bourbon virus" after Bourbon County, Kansas.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Bourbon Virus, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Kansas, VIROLOGY, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10918

Fever with thrombocytopenia associated with a novel Bunyavirus in China.

New Eng. J. Med., 364, 1523-1532., 2011.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Yu, Liang, Zhang. Discovery of a new virus, suspected by the authors to be tick-borne. The authors named the virus, "severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus" (SFTSV Bunyavirus). Digital facsimile from nejm.org at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › SFTSV Bunyavirus Disease, VIROLOGY
  • 10919

Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks as reservoir and vector of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus in China.

Emerg. Infect. Dis., 21, 1770-1776, 2015.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Luo, Zhao, Wen. Discovery that the tick H longicornis can transmit the SFTSV transstadially and transovarially, and could potentially be both the reservoir and vector of the virus.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › China, People's Republic of, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › SFTSV Bunyavirus Disease, VIROLOGY
  • 10920

Powassan virus: Field investigations in Northern Ontario, 1959-1961.

Canad. med. Ass. J., 86, 971-974, 1962.

The authors isolated a virus from the brain of a child who died of encephalitis in Powassan, Ontario, and named it the Powassan virus. They posited a tick vector and possible rodent natural hosts.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Neuroinfectious Diseases › Encephalitis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Powassan Virus, VIROLOGY, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 10921

Does a human tick-borne disease exist in British Columbia?

Canad. med. Ass. J., 2, 686, 1912.

Report on the first cases of "tick paralysis", a potentially lethal disease treatable by removing the tick. Follow-up paper by Todd: "Tick bite in British Columbia," Canad. med. Assoc. J., 2 (1912) 1118-1119. Unlike most other tick-borne diseases tick paralysis is not caused by an infectious organism, but by a neurotoxin produced in the tick's salivary gland.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Tick Paralysis, TOXICOLOGY › Neurotoxicology
  • 10922

Identification of a novel pathogenic Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis with unusually high spirochaetemia: A descriptive study.

Lancet Infectious Diseases, 5, 556-564, 2016.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Pritt, Mead, Johnson. Discovery of Lyme Borreliosis or Borrelia mayonii, a new variant of B. burgdorferi.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tick-Borne Diseases › Lyme Disease, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Minnesota, VIROLOGY, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10923

Isolation and partial characterization of a new virus causing acute haemorrhagic fever in Zaire.

Lancet, 309, 569-571, 1977.

The first of three papers published in Lancet back to back describing the discovery of Ebola Virus Disease. In this paper the authors described isolation of the virus, imaged it with an electron microscope, and named the virus. 

The second paper in the series was Bowen, E.T., Lloyd, G., Harris, W. J., et al, "Viral hemorrhagic fever in southern Sudan and northern Zaire. preliminary studies on the aetiological agent," Lancet, 309, 571-573.

The third paper is entry 7866 in this online bibliography.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Congo, Democratic Republic of the, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Sudan, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Ebola Virus Disease, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Filoviridae › Ebolavirus, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 10924

Ebola virus haemorrhagic fever. Edited by Stefan R. Pattyn.

Amsterdam: Elsevier, 1978.

Among the essays in this book two are of special note:

 1. Piot, P., Sureau, P., Breman, J.G., Clinical aspects of Ebola virus infection in Yambuku area, Zaire, 1976  (pp. 157-166). This is the first clinical description of Ebola haemorrhagic fever. The authors were the first team of Westerners to arrive at and enter the Yambuku mission hospital.

2. Sureau, P., Piot, P., Breman, J.G. Containment and surveillance of an epidemic of Ebola virus infection in Yambuku area, Zaire, 1976. (pp. 116-121).  The first account of the heroic efforts of the authors to contain this epidemic at its epicenter under practically unsurmountable odds.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)

 



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Ebola Virus Disease, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Filoviridae › Ebolavirus
  • 10925

Discovery and description of Ebola Zaire virus in 1976 and relevance to the West African epidemic during 2013-2016.

J. infect. Dis., 214, (Suppl. 3) S93-S101, 2016.

A first hand account of events as they occurred in Yambuku in 1976, including the causes and reasons for the spread of Ebola within the Yambuku Mission hospital, the probable index event/patient (not identified), and the extreme shortage of syringes and needles in this small village hospital. The paper also relates these details to the three-country (Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia) West African epidemic of 2013-2016.

Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this liink.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this paper and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Guinea, Republic of, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Liberia, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Sierra Leone, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Ebola Virus Disease, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Filoviridae › Ebolavirus
  • 10926

Ebola virus infection in imported primates - Virginia, 1989.

Virginia Epidemiology Bulletin, 89, No. 12, 1-2, 1989.

Also published with same title in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 38 (1989) 831, 832-837. Discovery of the "Ebola Reston" strain of the Ebola virus. The strain is lethal in monkeys; it turned out to be non-pathogenic for humans.

Digital text from cdc.gov at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this paper and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Ebola Virus Disease, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Filoviridae › Ebolavirus, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy › Primatology
  • 10927

Fruit bats as reservoirs of Ebola virus.

Nature, 438, 575-576, 2005.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Leroy, Kumulungui, Pourrut. The authors showed that fruit bats, while asymptomatic, act as reservoirs and potential carriers of Ebola virus in Africa. These bats are eaten by people in Central Africa.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.).



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Ebola Virus Disease, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Filoviridae › Ebolavirus
  • 10928

Emergence of Zaire Ebola virus disease in Guinea.

New Eng. J. Med., 371, 1418-1425, 2014.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Baize, Pannetier, Oestereich. The authors used PCR, viral sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis to track down the index case, a two-year-old child in Meliandou village, Guékédou Prefecture, southern Guinea. This case, in which the child died on December 6, 2013, sparked the Ebola Zaire epidemic of 2014. The authors tracked down all contacts with the child to a point of unstoppable spread and dissemination. In a multi-country collaboration the virus was sequenced and characterized.

Digital facsimile from nejm.org at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Guinea, Republic of, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Ebola Virus Disease, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Filoviridae › Ebolavirus, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10929

Clinical illness and outcomes in patients with Ebola in Sierra Leone.

New Eng. J. Med., 371, 2092-2100, 2014.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Schieffelin, Shaffer, Goba. The authors used "quantitative reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction assays to assess the load of Ebola virus (EBOV, Zaire species) in a subgroup of patients." Includes data on patient clinical characteristics and presentation of the illness, describes clinical pathology and lab abnormalities observed in the hot zone, presents management recommendations, special precautions and infection control advice. Digital facsimile from nejm.org at this link.

With: Chertow, Daniel S., Kleine, Christian, Edwards, Jeffrey K., "Ebola virus disease in West Africa--Clinical manifestations and management," New Eng. J. Med., 371 (2014) 2054-2057. Authors present a system of "phases of the illness", and practical information on the logistics of fighting it.

"In resource-limited areas, isolation of the sick from the population at large has been the cornerstone of control of Ebola virus disease (EVD) since the virus was discovered in 1976.1 Although this strategy by itself may be effective in controlling small outbreaks in remote settings, it has offered little hope to infected people and their families in the absence of medical care. In the current West African outbreak, infection control and clinical management efforts are necessarily being implemented on a larger scale than in any previous outbreak, and it is therefore appropriate to reassess traditional efforts at disease management. Having cared for more than 700 patients with EVD between August 23 and October 4, 2014, in the largest Ebola treatment unit in Monrovia, Liberia (see diagrams), we believe that our cumulative clinical observations support a rational approach to EVD management in resource-limited settings." Digital facsimile of the paper from nejm.org at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Liberia, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Sierra Leone, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Ebola Virus Disease, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Filoviridae › Ebolavirus
  • 10930

Clinical care of two patients with Ebola virus disease in the United States.

New Eng. J. Med., 371, 2402-2409, 2014.

Report on Ebola virus disease management from the Emory University unit and its specialists detailing the diagnosis, management, complications and expectations of this illness for infectious disease physicians. The authors emphasized the key role that intensive fluid management played in patient outcome.

"The largest outbreak of EVD in history began in December 2013 in Guinea, a country in West Africa.1 By late March, Liberia had reported seven cases. By the end of May, the epidemic had spread to Sierra Leone. As of November 5, 2014, a total of 13,042 cases of EVD (including 4818 deaths) had been reported in six countries in West Africa (Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria, and Senegal), the United States, and Spain.2"

Digital facsimile from nejm.org at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)

 



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Ebola Virus Disease, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Filoviridae › Ebolavirus
  • 10931

Our shared legacy: Nursing education at Johns Hopkins, 1889–2006. Edited by Mame Warren in association with the Johns Hopkins Nurses' Alumni Association.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005.


Subjects: NURSING › History of Nursing, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Maryland, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10932

Leading the way: A history of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012.


Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Maryland
  • 10933

A history of the Society of Apothecaries.

London: Society of Apothecaries, 1998.


Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 10934

The history of the Royal Society of Medicine.

London: Royal Society of Medicine, 2001.


Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 10935

Reading contagion: The hazards of reading in the age of print.

Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2018.


Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › History of Infectious Disease, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10936

The Canon of Medicine (al-Qānūn fi'l-tibb). Adapted by Laleh Bakhtiar from translations of Volume 1 by O. Cameron Gruner and Mazar H. Shah. Correlated with the Arabic by Jay R. Crook with notes by O. Cameron Gruner.

Chicago, IL: KAZI Publications, Inc. , 1999.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine
  • 10937

Opticae thesaurus: Alhazeni Arabis libri septem, nunc primum editi; Eiusdem liber De Crepusculis et nubium ascensionibus. Edited by Friedrich Risner.

Basel: per Eusebium Episcopium Nicolai fr. haeredes, 1572.

 The Arab mathematician, astronomer, and physicist of the Islamic Golden Age Alhazen made significant contributions to the principles of optics and the theory of visual perception in his Opticae thesaurus. Risner's edition also included Witelo's Perspectiva.

Modern edition: Alhacen's theory of visual perception. A critical edition, with English translation and commentary, of the first three books of Alhacen's De aspectibus, the medieval Latin version of Ibn-al-Haytham's Kitāb al-Manāzir by A. Mark Smith. 2 vols. Philadelphia, American Philosophical Society, 2001.



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, OPHTHALMOLOGY › Physiology of Vision, Optics
  • 10938

The eye of the lynx. Galileo, his friends, and the beginnings of modern natural history.

Chicago & London: University of Chicago Press, 2002.


Subjects: NATURAL HISTORY › History of Natural History
  • 10939

Zika virus. (II). Pathogenicity and physical properties.

Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg., 46, 521-534, 1952.

Dick's second paper on the Zika virus, immediately following his first paper in the same volume of the same journal (see no. 7864). First statement that the Aedes aegypti mosquito is the vector of transmission of the Zika virus. The author trapped the mosquitos on a tree platform in the area of the Zika forest where the viral infections occurred, and traced the virus to the mosquitos.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Uganda, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Zika Virus Disease, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Zika Virus
  • 10940

Neutralizing antibodies against certain recently isolated viruses in the sera of human beings residing in East Africa.

J. Immunol., 69, 223-234, 1952.

First report of human illness caused by Zika virus, detected in Uganda and Tanzania. 38 patients had neutralizing antibodies to Zika virus in their blood serum, proving that they had been infected by the virus.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Tanzania, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Uganda, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Zika Virus Disease, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Zika Virus
  • 10941

The 3.8Å resolution cryo-EM structure of Zika Virus.

Science, 352, 467-470, 2016.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Sirohi, Rossmann, Kuhn. Using cryogenic-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), the authors presented the molecular structure of the Zika virus at 3.8Å resolution. Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Zika Virus Disease, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Zika Virus, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10942

Wolbachia blocks currently circulating Zika virus isololates in Brazilian Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

Cell Host Microbe, 19, 771-774, 2016.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Dutra, Rocha, Moreira. The authors infected lab populations of mosquitos with Wolbachia pipientis, a common parasitic microbe that infects a high proportion of insects. They then released the infected mosquitos into native populations of wild mosquitos, infecting the Aedes aegypti mosquitos. It was found that the infected mosquitos did not transmit the Zika virus because the Wolbachia stops or blocks Zika virus transmission in the mosquitos. Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Wolbachia, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Zika Virus Disease, PARASITOLOGY, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Zika Virus
  • 10943

Studies on Rickettsia-like micro-organisms in insects.

J. med. Res., 44, 329-374.7, 1924.

Hertig and Wolbach first described the parasitic microbe Wolbachia in the common house mosquito in 1924. In 1936 Hertig formally described the species as Wolbachia pipientis. Since then the genus Wolbachia has become of considerable research interest due to its ubiquitous distribution, its many different evolutionary interactions, and its use as a biocontrol agent. Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this link.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Wolbachia, MICROBIOLOGY, PARASITOLOGY, ZOOLOGY › Arthropoda › Entomology
  • 10944

Local mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus - Miami - Dade and Broward counties, Florida, June-August 2016.

Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. (MMWR) 65, 1032-1038, 2016.

First report on Zika virus infections in the U.S., tracing the area of infection to a specific square mile, creating a buffer zone around the area, targeting it for spraying and mosquito collection, intervention, mass screening and testing. Nevertheless the disease became widespread. Digital facsimile from cdc.gov at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Zika Virus Disease, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Florida, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Zika Virus
  • 10945

Genomic epidemiology reveals multiple introductions of Zika virus into the United States.

Nature, 546, 401-405, 2017.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Grubaugh, Ladner, Kraemer. The authors found that the Zika virus was introduced into Florida at least 4 times, but perhaps as many as 40 times, before it was detected, that it entered Florida from the Carribean (probably Puerto Rico) and most likely from cruise ship travel.

Follow-up papers published immediately after this in the same journal issue:

Faria, N.R.; Quick, J., Claro, I. M.; et al. "Establishment and cryptic transmission of Zika virus in Brazil and the Americas," Nature, 546 (2017) 406-410. The authors generated data from a travelling genomics laboratory sequencing Zika virus (ZIKV) genomes around the country. They found that the virus was first detected in Brazil in May 2015, about a year after it was first introducted.

Metsky, Hayden C.; Matranga, Christian B.; Wohl, Shirlee, et al. "Virus evolution and spread in the Americas," Nature, 546 (2017) 411-415. The authors showed the spread of Zika in the Americas using genomes of people and mosquitoes (110 ZIKV genomes from 10 countries), tracing the common ancestor of ZIKV in the Americas to about late 2013 and pinpointing it to the NE/Bahia region of Brazil.

Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for these references and their interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genomics › Pathogenomics, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Zika Virus Disease, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Florida, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Zika Virus
  • 10946

The emergence of Zika virus and its new clinical syndromes.

Nature, 560, 573-581, 2018.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Pierson, Diamond. Analyzes, and documents with 147 references, the variety of new clinical syndromes, including fetal / in utero effects, caused by the Zika virus. Also addresses adult human pathology and viral aspects.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: EMBRYOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Zika Virus Disease, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Zika Virus
  • 10947

From farriery to veterinary medicine, 1785-1795.

London: Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, 1962.

A history of the founding and earliest years of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in England.



Subjects: VETERINARY MEDICINE › History of Veterinary Medicine
  • 10948

An index to selected Japanese medical literature of Pre-Meiji times.

Los Angeles, CA: Dawson's Book Shop, 1964.

This is an index to a series of 5 offprints by Mestler entitled "A galaxy of old Japanese medical books with miscellaneous notes on early medicine in Japan" published in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association from 1954-57. Copies of the offprints are bound after the index. They are as follows:

Pt. I. Medical history and biography. General works. Anatomy. Physiology and pharmacology. Bull. Med. Lib. Ass., 42 (1954) 287-327.

Pt. II. Acupuncture and moxibusion. Bathing. Balneotherapy and massage. Nursing, pediatrics and hygiene. Obstetrics and gynecology. Ibid, 42, 468-500.

Pt. III. Urology, syphilology and dermatology. Surgery and pathology. Ibid, 44 (1956) 125-159.

Pt. IV. Ophthalmology, psychiatry, dentistry. Ibid, 44, 327-347

Pt. V. Biblio-historical addenda. Corrections. Postscript. Acknowledgments. Ibid, 45, 164-219



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Subjects, Japanese Medicine › History of Japanese Medicine
  • 10949

Japanese botany during the period of wood-block printing.

Los Angeles, CA: Dawson's Book Shop, 1961.

I. An essay on the development of natural history, especially botany, in Japan; on the influence of early Chinese & Western contacts; on Japanese books & wood-block illustration.

II. An exhibition of Japanese books & manuscripts, mostly botanical, held at the Clements Library of the University of Michigan, in commemoration of the hundredth anniversary (1954) of the first treaty between the United States and Japan.



Subjects: BOTANY › History of Botany, Japanese Medicine › History of Japanese Medicine
  • 10950

De retardatione accidentium senectutis cum aliis opusculis de rebus medicinalibus. Nunc primum ediderunt A. G. Little [and] E. Withington.

Oxford: E Typographeo Clarendoniano, 1928.

New edition edited from the 1590 printed edition in comparison with existing medieval manuscripts.



Subjects: GERIATRICS / Gerontology / Aging, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 10951

A neurotropic virus isolated from the blood of a native in Uganda.

Am. J. Trop. Med. & Hygiene, 20, 471-492, 1940.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Smithburn, Hughes, Burke. In 1937 the authors isolated a virus from the blood of an adult female with fever from the Omogo West Nile district of Uganda, and named it West Nile virus. They described pathology that involves encephalitis and can cause death in monkeys. Digital facsimile from ajtmh.org at this link

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Uganda, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Neuroinfectious Diseases › Encephalitis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › West Nile Virus , VIROLOGY
  • 10952

Transmission of West Nile virus by infected Aedes albopictus.

Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol., 53, 49-50, 1943.

The authors demonstrated that the Aedes albopictus mosquito is the vector of West Nile virus.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › West Nile Virus , VIROLOGY
  • 10953

Outbreak of West Nile-like viral encephalitis -- New York, 1999.

Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. (MMWR) 48, 845-849, 1999.

On October 1, 1999 the CDC reported a cluster of human encephalitis cases; prior to these cases many crows had been dying. The "sentinel event" in this outbreak was the report to the New York Health Dept. by Dr. D. Asnis of two back to back human encephalitus cases. At this time the CDC was unwilling to make a definite attribution of the cases of viral encephalitis to West Nile virus.

Digital facsimile from the CDC at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Neuroinfectious Diseases › Encephalitis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › West Nile Virus , VIROLOGY
  • 10954

Isolation of West Nile virus from mosquitoes, crows, and a Cooper's hawk in Connecticut.

Science, 286, 2331-2333, 1999.

First definite identification of the West Nile virus in the Western hemisphere.

This paper was immediately followed in the same issue of Science by Lanciott, R.S., Roehrig, J.T., Deubet, V. et al, "Origin of the West Nile virus responsible for an outbreak of encephalitis in the Northeastern United States," Science, 286 (1999) 2333-2337. This paper published the sequence of the genome of the virus, completely characterized it, and proved that it was identical to the sequence found in a dead goose in Israel in 1998, showing the source of the virus.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Neuroinfectious Diseases › Encephalitis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › West Nile Virus , U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Connecticut, VIROLOGY
  • 10955

A history of Yale's School of Medicine: Passing torches to others.

New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2002.


Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Connecticut
  • 10956

Medicine at Harvard: The first three hundred years.

Hanover, NH: University Press of New England, 1977.


Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 10957

An Oak Spring herbaria: Herbs and herbals from the fourteenth to the nineteenth centuries. A selection of the rare books, manuscripts and works of art in the collection of Rachel Lambert Mellon by Lucia Tongiorgi Tomasi & Tony Willis. Edited with a description of the American herbals by Mark Argetsinger.

Upperville, VA: Oak Spring Garden Library, 2009.

A spectacularly beautiful volume as are the other 3 vols in the Oak Spring series.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Botany / Materia Medica, BOTANY › History of Botany, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines › History of Materia Medica, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10958

Les nouvelles descouvertes sur toutes les parties de la medecine. Recueillies en l'année 1679.

Paris: Laurent d'Houry, 1679.

Blégny edited the first medical periodical published in the vernacular. To begin with it reported only the transactions of a medical society that Blégny organized. The periodical continued only until 1685, and the title changed several times during this brief period. See Albert G. Nicholls, "Nicolas de Blegny and the first medical periodical," Canadian Medical Association Journal, 31 (1934) 198-202.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Periodicals
  • 10959

Herbario nuovo...con figure, che rappresentano le vive piante, che nascondo in tutta Europa, & nell' Indie Orientali, & Occidentali.

Rome: Bartolomeo Bonafidino, 1585.

Durante, physician to Pope Sixtus V, published this encyclopedia of medicinal plants from Europe and the East and West Indies, illustrated with woodcuts by Leonardo Parasole. The work contains discussions of the habitat and medicinal uses of each species, in both Italian and Latin. It went through eleven editions in Italian, German and Spanish. Reprints appeared occasionally for over 130 years. 



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 10960

Opera medicinalia. Ed: Peregrinus Cavalcobovis, with a preface by Nicolaus Gupalatinus. Consisting of: Canones universales. De simplicibus. Grabadin. Practica.

Venice: Clemens Patavinus, 1471.

This undated edition, which the ISTC im00508000 catalogues as "not before 18 May 1471", may be the earliest printed edition of the writings of the medieval Persian or Assyrian Nestorian Christian physician Yuhanna ibn Masawaih, whose name was also written Ibn Masawaih, Masawaiyh, and in Latin Mesue, Masuya, Mesue Major, Msuya, and Mesue the Elder. Another edition of Mesue's Opera medicinalia, for which there is a definite publication date, appeared in Padua on 9 June 1471 (ISTC no. im00509000). The two editions printed in 1471 were the first printed editions of any works by Mesue.



Subjects: Collected Works: Opera Omnia, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Persian Islamic Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS
  • 10961

De medicamentis empiricis physicis ac rationalibus liber.... Edited by Janus Cornarius. Item Claudii Galeni libri novem nunc primum Latini facti.... Jani Cornarii.

Basel: Hieronymus Froben, 1536.

The Gallo-Roman physician Marcellus was born in Bordeaux. He may have served as magister officiorum under Theodosius I, or may have been royal physician. Sarton (Introduction to the history of science I, 391) considered his work "an extrordinary mixture of traditional knowledge, popular (Celtic) medicine, and rank superstition. Interesting also for the historian of botany because of the great number of plants mentioned."

For this edition "Cornarius worked from a manuscript written in the mid-9th century that was superior to the one used for the Teubner edition of 1889 but which was thought to have been lost; it was rediscovered in 1913 and used for the 1916 edition of Marcellus published in Teubner's Corpus Medicorum Latinorum series. Referred to as the Codex Parisinus, it contains Cornarius's corrections and marginal notes" (Wikipedia article on Janus Cornarius).

The writings by Galen in this edition are: De causis respirationis liber 1, De utilitate respirationis, liber 1, De difficultate respirations libri III, De uteri dissectione liber 1, De foetus formatione liber 1, De semine libri II.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Late Antiquity, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, EMBRYOLOGY, Magic & Superstition in Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, RESPIRATION
  • 10962

Libellus Rogerii Baconi Angli doctissimi mathematici et medici, De retardandis senectutis accidentibus et de sensibus conservandis.... opera Johannis Williams Oxoniensis.

Oxford: Ex officina typographica Iosephi Barnesii, 1590.

Translated into English by Richard Browne as The cure of old age and preservation of youth by Roger Bacon, a Franciscan frier (London, 1683). Digital facsimile of the 1683 edition from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: GERIATRICS / Gerontology / Aging, Gerontology , MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England
  • 10963

Replication and transcription of eukaryotic DNA in Esherichia coli.

Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA, 171, 1743-1747, 1974.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Morrow, Cohen, Chang, Boyer, Goodman, Helling. The authors inserted a eukaryotic gene (Xenopus laevus) linked to a plasmid into a prokaryote (E. coli) using techniques described in No. 257.5, and other techniques they invented on the fly. The plasmid replicated successfully in the E. Coli, and commanded the E. coli to execute the genetic message, i.e. the "functional molecular chimera."

Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Recombinant DNA, Biotechnology, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 10964

Expression in Escherichia coli of a chemically synthesized gene for the hormone somatostatin.

Science, 198, 1056-1063, 1977.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Itakura, Hirose, Crea..., Bolivar, Boyer. Synthesis of the gene for somatostatin (growth hormone-inhibiting hormone (GHIH). This was the first demonstration of a foreign gene inserted into E. coli and the first hormone genetically engineered in bacteria. The technique led to the biotechnological production of insulin by Genentech under the product name, Humulin. 

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation).



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Recombinant DNA, Biotechnology
  • 10965

Serologic identification and characterization of a macaque T-lymphotropic retrovirus closely related to HTLV-III.

Science, 228, 1199-1201, 1985.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Kanki, McLane... Essex. This paper was followed in the issue of Science by: Daniel, M., Letvi, N. L., King, N.W., "Isolation of T-cell tropic HTLV-3 - like retrovirus from macaques", Science, 228 (1985) 1201-1204. 

Discovery of Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVs), a species of retrovirus that cause peristent infections in "at least 45 species of African non-human primates."

"Virus strains from two of these primate species, SIVsmm in sooty mangabeys and SIVcpz in chimpanzees, are believed to have crossed the species barrier into humans, resulting in HIV-2 and HIV-1 respectively, the two human immunodeficiency viruses. The most likely route of transmission of HIV-1 to humans involves contact with the blood of chimps that are often hunted for bushmeat in Africa.[3] It is theorized SIV may have previously crossed the species barrier into human hosts multiple times throughout history, but it was not until recently, after the advent of modern transportation and global commuterism, that it finally took hold, spreading beyond localized decimations of a few individuals or single small tribal populations" (Wikipedia).

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: VETERINARY MEDICINE, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Retroviridae
  • 10966

Medicine at Michigan: A history of the University of Michigan Medical School at the Bicentennial.

Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 2017.


Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Michigan
  • 10967

Technology in the hospital: Transforming patient care in the early twentieth century.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995.


Subjects: INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › History of Biomedical Instrumentation
  • 10968

Bellevue: Three centuries of medicine and mayhem at America's most storied hospital.

New York: Doubleday, 2016.


Subjects: HOSPITALS › History of Hospitals, PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry
  • 10969

Ill composed: Sickness, gender, and belief in early modern England.

New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2015.

A cultural history of illness from the standpoint of how gender determined perceptions and experiences of illness in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10970

Wounded: A new history of the Western Front in World War I.

Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

A comprehensive account of medical care at the Western Front in World War I. Over 21 million military in were wounded in World War I, and nearly 10 million were killed.



Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10971

A heavy reckoning: War, medicine and survival in Afghanistan and beyond.

London: Wellcome, 2017.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Afghanistan, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Afghanistan, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10972

The bleeding disease: Hemophilia and the unintended consequences of medical progress.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011.


Subjects: GENETICS / HEREDITY › HEREDITARY / CONGENITAL DISEASES OR DISORDERS › Blood Disorders › Hemophilia, GENETICS / HEREDITY › History of Genetics / Heredity
  • 10973

Educating physicians: A call for reform of medical school and residency.

San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2010.

"The current blueprint for medical education in North America was drawn up in 1910 by Abraham Flexner in his report Medical Education in the United States and Canada. The basic features outlined by Flexner remain in place today. Yet with the past century's enormous societal changes, the practice of medicine and its scientific, pharmacological, and technological foundations have been transformed. Now medical education in the United States is at a crossroads: those who teach medical students and residents must choose whether to continue in the direction established over a hundred years ago or to take a fundamentally different course, guided by contemporary innovation and new understandings about how people learn.

"Emerging from an extensive study of physician education by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, Educating Physicians calls for a major overhaul of the present approach to preparing doctors for their careers. The text addresses major issues for the future of the field and takes a comprehensive look at the most pressing concerns in physician education today. The key findings of the study recommend four goals for medical education: standardization of learning outcomes and individualization of the learning process; integration of formal knowledge and clinical experience; development of habits of inquiry and innovation; and focus on professional identity formation.

"Like The Carnegie Foundation's revolutionizing Flexner Report of 1910, Educating Physicians is destined to change the way administrators and faculty in medical schools and programs prepare their physicians for the future" (Publisher).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10974

Prescribing by numbers: Drugs and the definition of disease.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.

"The second half of the twentieth century witnessed the emergence of a new model of chronic disease―diagnosed on the basis of numerical deviations rather than symptoms and treated on a preventive basis before any overt signs of illness develop―that arose in concert with a set of safe, effective, and highly marketable prescription drugs. Physician-historian Jeremy A. Greene examines the mechanisms by which drugs and chronic disease categories define one another within medical research, clinical practice, and pharmaceutical marketing, and he explores how this interaction has profoundly altered the experience, politics, ethics, and economy of health in late-twentieth-century America. His provocative analysis sheds light on the increasing presence of the subjectively healthy but highly medicated individual in the American medical landscape, suggesting how historical perspective can help to address the problems inherent in the program of pharmaceutical prevention" (publisher).



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 10975

A personal history of nuclear medicine.

London: Springer, 2006.


Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Autobiography, IMAGING › History of Imaging, Nuclear Medicine
  • 10976

Guardians of medical knowledge: The genesis of the Medical Library Association.

Larham, MA: Scarecrow Press, 2000.

Traces the first 50 years of the MLA, from its inception in 1898 in response to the unprecedented expansion of medical literature during the 19th century.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Institutional Medical Libraries, Histories of, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10977

Medicine in Maryland: The practice and profession, 1799-1999.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.


Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Maryland, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 10978

Aphrodisiacus. Containing a summary of the ancient writers on the venereal disease ... Extracted from the two tomes of Aloysius Luisinus, which by the direction of Dr. Boerhaave, were lately revised and reprinted at Leyden. Together with an index of all others omitted in that collection ... from the beginning of the sixteenth century down to the present time. With a large preface, by Daniel Turner.

London: John Clarke, 1736.

A partial English translation of Luisinus's, De morbo gallico omnia quae extant (1566-67) as expanded by Boerhaave (1728).  Digital facsimile of the 1736 work from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Syphilis, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Syphilis › History of Syphilis
  • 10979

An unquiet mind: A memoir of moods and madness.

New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1995.

An autobiographical study of bipolar disorder by a distinguished American clinical psychologist who personally suffers from this disorder.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Autobiography, PSYCHIATRY › Bipolar Disorder, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 10980

The Interurban Clinical Club (1905-1976): A record of achievement in clinical science.

[Place of Publication Not Identified]: Interurban Clinical Club, 1978.

"[William] Osler also made a very significant contribution to the realization of Flexner’s task by helping to create the Interurban Clinical Club in 1905 [8]. The purpose of this organization was the exchanging of ideas and the nurturing of fellowship among medical professors in the leading Eastern medical schools. Its aims included several goals that Flexner’s conception of medical education also incorporated; scientific investigation of disease was promoted, and methods of teaching were to be shared and improved. The club was largely responsible for the development of the scientific base of American medicine. It was the springboard to eminence for department and divisional heads of the leading medical schools in America. These were the individuals who forged institutional philosophies and standards of excellence in medical schools throughout the next century. The era of the clinical scientist in America dates from this organization; its members were academic physicians who became the vital link between the practicing physician and the basic scientist" (Duffy, "The Flexner Report -- 100 years later, " Yale J. Biol. Med., 84, (2011) 269-276).

Second edition: The Interurban Clinical Club (1905-1994) N.p.: The Interurban Clinical Club, 1995.



Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, Societies and Associations, Medical
  • 10981

The Johns Hopkins Hospital and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: A chronicle. 3 vols.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 19481963.

Vol. 1: Early Years 1867-1893; Vol. 2: 1893-1905; Vol. 3: 1905-1914.



Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, HOSPITALS › History of Hospitals, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Maryland
  • 10982

Heritage of excellence: The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions 1914-1947.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1974.


Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Maryland
  • 10983

Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the Johns Hopkins Hospital: The first 100 years. Edited by John A.Rock, Timothy R.B. Johnson, J. Donald Woodruff.

Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins, 1991.


Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › GYNECOLOGY › History of Gynecology, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › History of Obstetrics, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Maryland
  • 10984

Plague: A story of smallpox in Montreal.

New York: HarperCollins, 1991.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox › History of Smallpox
  • 10985

Osler's legacy: The department of medicine at Johns Hopkins 1889-1989.

Baltimore, MD: Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins, 1990.


Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Maryland
  • 10986

The Association of American Physicians, 1886-1986: A century of progress in medical science.

Baltimore, MD: The Association of American Physicians, 1986.

"The Association of American Physicians is a nonprofit, professional organization founded in 1885 by seven physicians, including Dr. William Osler and Dr. William Henry Welch, for “the advancement of scientific and practical medicine.” The Association is composed of members who are leading senior physician scientists and are competitively selected. Currently we have over 1700 active members and approximately 600 emeritus and honorary members from the United States, Canada and other countries. The goals of its members include the pursuit of medical knowledge, and the advancement through experimentation and discovery of basic and clinical science and their application to clinical medicine. Each year, individuals having attained excellence in achieving these goals, are recognized by nomination for membership by the Council of the Association. Their election gives them the opportunity to share their scientific discoveries and contributions with their colleagues at the annual meeting" (https://aap-online.org/).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, Societies and Associations, Medical
  • 10987

"For the welfare of mankind": The Commonwealth Fund and American medicine.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 10988

The American Clinical and Climatological Association: 1884-1984.

No place identified: The Association, 1984.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, Societies and Associations, Medical
  • 10989

Observations on some of the diseases of the parts of the human body. Chiefly taken from the dissections of morbid bodies.

London: G. Kearsly, 1763.

Clossy, an Irish physician, previously at Trinity College, Dublin, gave the first anatomy classes and dissections at King’s College in New York City (now Columbia) in 1763. Clossy worked closely with other King’s College faculty, including Samuel Bard, to professionalize the study of medicine in the United States. He is understood to have dissected the bodies of deceased slaves in his lectures. His Observations, which he wrote during the 1750s, was the first treatise on anatomy and pathology published by a physician working in America. Clossy had it printed in London. Some of Clossy's innovative observations bear a relationship to similar kinds of observations made by Morgagni (1761). Clossy had his book printed in London. He returned to Europe in 1780



Subjects: ANATOMY › 18th Century, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American Northeast, PATHOLOGY
  • 10990

Oslerian pathology: An assessment and annotated atlas of museum specimens.

Lawrence, KA: Coronado Press, 1981.

Covers the 55 remaining specimens of pathological preparations by William Osler preserved at McGill University. The book is divided into 4 sections: A: presentation and discussion of those aspects of Osler's activities related to pathology. B: Osler's orientation to the disease represented. C: An atlas of the 55 specimens, each with black & white photograph, original description and annotation. D: reproductions of Osler's handwritten autopsy protocols from 10 of the 55 specimens.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological , PATHOLOGY, PATHOLOGY › History of Pathology
  • 10991

Two centuries of medicine. A History of the School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1965.


Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Pennsylvania
  • 10992

Every man our neighbor: A brief history of the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Boston: Little, Brown, 1961.


Subjects: HOSPITALS › History of Hospitals, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 10993

A navy surgeon in California 1846-1847. The journal of Marius Duvall. Edited by Fred Blackburn Rogers.

San Francisco, CA: John Howell, 1957.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Navy, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › California
  • 10994

Diseases of the liver and biliary system.

Oxford: Blackwell, 1955.

13th edition, 2018.

"In 1959 she [Sherlock] became the United Kingdom's first ever female Professor of Medicine when she was appointed at the Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine in London. She founded the liver unit which was located in a temporary wooden structure on the roof of the hospital in Gray’s Inn Road. Despite its location, the department attracted trainees from around the world, and many current leaders in the field of hepatology spent time there. Research in several different areas of liver disease was undertaken: including; bilirubin metabolism, haemochromatosischolestasisdrug-induced liver diseasealbumin synthesis, portal hypertension and ascites, autoimmune liver disease and its treatment with corticosteroids, and the use of liver biopsy in the diagnosis of liver disease were all studied. In 1974 the department moved to the new hospital in Hampstead, where it was situated close to the clinical wards, on the 10th floor. Research continued there, with viral hepatitis, liver transplantation and endoscopic treatment of varices all becoming important areas of study" (Wikipedia article on Sheila Sherlock).



Subjects: HEPATOLOGY › Diseases of the Liver, HEPATOLOGY › Diseases of the Liver › Portal Hypertension, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 10995

Intracardiac surgery with the aid of a mechanical pump oxygenator system (Gibbon type): Report of eight cases.

Proc. Staff Meetings of the Mayo Clinic, 30, 201-6, 1955.

Co-authored with JW Dushane, RT Patrick, DE Donald, PS Hetzel and EH Wood,

"Kirklin refined the heart-lung machine (screen type) originally developed by Gibbon, to the point that it allowed the person to receive oxygenated blood, temporarily providing a blood free environment to work on the heart.[11][12][13] In 1954, Kirklin's rival, C. Walton Lillehei used the technique of cross circulation to operate on an 11-month-old baby who died on the 11th day after surgery. Usually using the parent for cross circulation, he performed 45 operations of ventricular septal defects (VSDs), ASDs and tetralogy of Fallot. 30 survived and 20 were still alive 50 years later.[10]

"Following the experimental trial in dogs, which by 1955 had demonstrated a 90% survival following heart-lung bypass, Kirklin's team were granted permission by the governance of the Mayo Clinic to go ahead with a clinical trial in eight children, using the machine. In March 1955, the first child survived a repair of a VSD.[9] In this planned series of clinical cases, a 50% survival was reported. This was the first clinical series of open heart surgeries performed with a mechanical pump-oxygenator. Prior to this, the conditions were predominantly fatal. He therefore performed the world’s first successful series of open heart operations using the heart-lung machine. The Board of Governors at the Mayo Clinic approved the first eight operations, of which 4 (50%) survived.[11]

As a result, open heart surgeries and repairs of some heart defects could be performed under direct vision routinely and with a high degree of success. Kirklin's modifications and team work also allowed repairs of tetralogy of Fallot.[6][7][10][11] "(Wikipedia article on John W. Kirklin, accessed 10-2019).



Subjects: CARDIOVASCULAR (Cardiac) SURGERY, INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › Medical Instruments › Heart-Lung Machine, Pediatric Surgery
  • 10996

Medical interchange between the British Isles and America before 1801. Based on the FitzPatrick Lectures for 1939.

London: Royal College of Physicians, 1946.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States
  • 10997

Bibliography of Australian medicine and health services to 1950. 4 vols.

Canberra, Australia: Australian Government Publishing Service, 1988.

"A joint project of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and the Department of Community Services and Health."



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Subjects, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Australia
  • 10998

The Australian Army Medical Corps in Egypt. An illustrated and detailed account of the early organisation and work of the Australian medical units in Egypt in 1914-1915.

London: H. K. Lewis, 1918.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Australia, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Egypt, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I
  • 10999

Doctoring the South: Southern physicians and everyday medicine in the mid-nineteenth century.

Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2004.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States › American South