An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15429 entries, 13282 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 23, 2021

Browse by Entry Number 11000–11099

99 entries
  • 11000

The medical reports of John Y. Bassett, M.D., the Alabama student. Edited by Daniel C. Elkin.

Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas, 1941.

Bassett was the subject of William Osler's famous essay, "An Alabama Student."



Subjects: Bioclimatology, Topography, Medical, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Alabama
  • 11001

Postures & practices during labor among primitive peoples: Adaptations to modern obstetrics, with chapters on taboos & superstitions & postpartum gymnastics.

New York: Paul B. Hoeber, 1934.


Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Medical Anthropology, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS
  • 11002

Medical women of America: A short history of the pioneer medical women of America and of a few of their colleagues in England.

New York: Froben Press, 1933.

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11003

The history of hemostasis.

New York: Paul B. Hoeber, 1929.

Reprinted with additions and corrections from Annals of Medical History, N. S. Vol. I, No. 2, March, 1929.



Subjects: CARDIOVASCULAR (Cardiac) SURGERY › History of Cardiac Surgery, HEMATOLOGY › Hemostasis, HEMATOLOGY › History of Hematology, SURGERY: General › History of Surgery
  • 11004

Stretchers: The story of a hospital unit on the western front.

New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1929.

History of the U.S. Army American Expeditionary Forces Evacuation Hospital no. 8, World War 1, 1914-1918, in which Pottle served. Pottle was the greatest Boswell and Samuel Johnson scholar.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link



Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I
  • 11005

A medical review of Soviet Russia.

London: British Medical Association, 1928.

Gantt went to Russia in the 1920s with the American Relief Administration, and became a student of Pavlov.  Moving to Johns Hopkins in 1929, he founded the Pavlovian Laboratory, and devoted his career to understanding the connections between physiological functions and behavior. He translated many of Pavlov's works into English. This book was published in 1928, 11 years after the Russian Revolution, and marked the beginning of Stalin's first Five Year Plan.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Russia, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 11006

The life of Sir William Osler. 2 vols.

Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1925.

Cushing received the Pulitzer Prize for this masterful biography, which remains the essential account of Osler's life, work, and selections from his correspondence. Cushing donated his very extensive research material for this book to the Osler Library at McGill University. Cushing's source material was arranged in a separate file for virtually every week in Osler's life for which Cushing had data.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Biographies of Individuals
  • 11007

Beginnings of medical education in and near Chicago: The institutions and the men.

Proc. Inst. Med. Chicago, 5 , 1925.

Digital facsimile of separately paginated 144pp. illustrated offprint from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Illinois
  • 11008

A history of the Massachusetts Medical Society: With brief biographies of the founders and chief officers, 1781-1922.

Norwood, MA: Privately Printed, 1923.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Societies and Associations, Medical, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Massachusetts
  • 11009

Disease and discovery: A history of the Johns Hopkins School Hygiene & Public Health 1916-1939.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1987.


Subjects: PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Maryland, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11010

Diagnosis of protozoa and worms parasitic in man.

Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, 1921.


Subjects: PARASITOLOGY › Protozoa
  • 11011

The story of U.S. Army Base Hospital No. 5. By a member of the unit.

Cambridge, MA: The University Press, 1919.

An account of the Base Hospital in which Cushing served in World War I, based upon his wartime diaries. Limited to 250 copies, some of which were issued in cloth-backed printed boards, and others in printed wrappers. Cushing issued this work anonymously, though he personally inscribed and signed various copies for presentation.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I
  • 11012

McGill medicine: The first half century, 1829-1885. McGill medicine: The second half century, 1885-1936. 2 vols.

Montréal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 19962006.

The second volume was co-authored by Hanaway, Creuss, and James Darragh.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession
  • 11013

The General: A history of the Montreal General Hospital.

Montréal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2016.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, HOSPITALS › History of Hospitals
  • 11014

The medical report of the Rice Expedition to Brazil.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Library, 1918.

The expedition was led by Alexander H. Rice, Jr., an American physician, geographer, geologist and explorer noted for his expeditions to the Amazon Basin.

"As a geographer and explorer Rice specialized in rivers.[1][7] On seven expeditions, beginning in 1907, he explored 500,000 square miles (1,300,000 km2) of the Amazon Basin,[7] mapping a number of previously unmapped rivers in the northwestern area of the Amazon Basin reaching into Colombia and Venezuela.

After his 1915 marriage, his socialite wife accompanied him on several expeditions to South America which were chronicled in the geographic literature and followed closely by the popular press. A 1916 expedition was the subject of a 1918 book by a colleague, William Thomas Councilman.[8] During a 1920 trip, it was reported that "the party warded off an attack by savages and killed two cannibals"[9]‍—‌​"scantily clad ... very ferocious and of large stature".[10] (A subsequent headline read: "Explorer Rice Denies That He Was Eaten By Cannibals".[11] In 1913, the Harvard College Class of 1898 Quindecennial Report had noted that, "An interesting feature of [Rice's] work in South America is frequent reports to the effect that he has been eaten by cannibals or has been a victim of the snakes which are said to be laying in wait for him all the time.")[12]" (Wikipedia article on Alexander H. Rice, Jr., accessed 10-2019).

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Biogeography › Zoogeography, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, Geography of Disease / Health Geography, Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientsts
  • 11015

A study of prolonged fasting.

Washington, DC: Carnegie Institution of Washington, 1915.

Study of a subject who was allowed to drink water but ingested no food for 31 days. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Metabolism & Metabolic Disorders
  • 11016

Prostitution in Europe. Introduction by John D. Rockefeller, Jr.

New York: The Century Co., 1919.

"Publications of the Bureau of Social Hygiene". Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: PUBLIC HEALTH, SEXUALITY / Sexology
  • 11017

History of medical teaching in Trinity College Dublin and of the School of Physic In Ireland.

Dublin: Hanna and Neal, 1912.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Ireland, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession
  • 11018

Harvey Cushing: A biography.

Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas, 1946.

Remains the most comprehensive biography of Cushing, by his student Fulton.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Biographies of Individuals, NEUROSURGERY › History of Neurosurgery
  • 11019

The private science of Louis Pasteur.

Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1995.

"His biography of Pasteur was viewed as an outstanding work of scholarship which penetrated the secrecy that had surrounded much of the legendary scientist's laboratory work. Geison used Pasteur's laboratory notebooks and published papers to described some of the most famous episodes in the history of science—including their darker sides, such as the human risks entailed in Pasteur's haste to develop the rabies vaccine. A reviewer wrote in the New England Journal of Medicine that the book 'requires us to reevaluate our heroes and consider the complexities of science instead of merely clinging to comforting and heroic myths.' [3]"



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Biographies of Individuals, IMMUNOLOGY › History of Immunology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › History of Infectious Disease, MICROBIOLOGY
  • 11020

The medical annals of Maryland 1799-1899. Prepared for the centennial of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty.

Baltimore, MD: Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of the State of Maryland, 1903.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Societies and Associations, Medical, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Maryland
  • 11021

The practice of medicine by women in the United States.

Journal of Social Science, 14, 178-, 1881.

"Emily F. Pope, C. Augusta Pope, and Emma Call, doctors on the staff of the New England Hospital, published a study on women physicians. Their sample included a group of 430 women doctors who had graduated from various medical schools since 1870. Only 13 of the respondents reported poor health and only 4 of these ascribed their illness to the pressures of their practice. Furthermore, only 34 of the 307 who reponded to a special question regarding menstruation stated that they were periodically incapacitated. 'We do not think it would be easy,' the authors delcared, 'to find a better record of health among an equal number of women, taken at random from all over the country.' (Walsh, Doctors wanted, No women Need Apply, pp 131-32)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1800 - 1899
  • 11022

The college story: Valedictory address to the twenty-ninth graduating class of the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania.

Philadelphia: Grant, Faires, and Rodgers, 1881.

"Bodley sought to survey all the graduates of the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania from its founding 1850 through 1880. Of the total 276 graduates, 244 were alive. Her survey is based on the 186 graduates who responded to her questionnaire" (Drachman, Hospital with a heart, p. 226). Digital facsimile from Drexel University Libraries at this link.



Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1800 - 1899
  • 11023

Catching babies: The professionalization of childbirth, 1870-1920.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1995.

Concerns the transition in the early 20th century in the United States from women midwives delivering most babies to professional obstetricians--mostly men--delivering almost all babies by the 1950s. It researches why midwifery did not become professionalized in the same way as nursing or doctoring.



Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › History of Obstetrics, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › Midwives, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11024

Physiology in the American context, 1850-1940. Edited by Gerald L. Geison.

Bethesda, MD: Williams & Wilkins, 1987.

Traces the development of American physiology in the cultural context of the period. Divided into three parts: social and institutional history; physiology in relation to other fields; and instruments, materials and techniques.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , PHYSIOLOGY › History of Physiology, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 11025

English-speaking students of medicine at the University of Leiden.

Edinburgh & London: Oliver and Boyd, 1932.

Based upon an examination of the Album of Students at Leiden from 1575 to 1875.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works), COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Netherlands, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession
  • 11026

History of medicine in the province of Quebec.

Montréal: McGill University, 1931.

Reprinted, with additions, from "The Storied Province of Quebec". Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11027

This idle trade: On doctors who were writers.

New York: Dragonfly Press, 1989.


Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 11028

Dickens's doctors.

Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1979.


Subjects: LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 11029

William Osler: A life in medicine.

Toronto, Canada: University of Toronto Press, 1999.

The most significant biography of Sir William Osler since Harvey Cushing's work published in 1925.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Biographies of Individuals
  • 11030

Harvey Cushing: A life in surgery.

New York: Oxford University Press, 2007.

A less idolatrous biography of Cushing than Fulton's work of 1946.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Biographies of Individuals, NEUROSURGERY › History of Neurosurgery
  • 11031

“Album de la guerre”: Five hundred photographs, seventy drawings and thirteen articles by members of Base Hospital no. 4, U.S.A. . . . and Mobile Hospital no. 5, U.S.A. . . . covering a period of twenty-three months from May 8th, 1917 to April 8th, 1919.

Cleveland: Scientific Illustrating Studios, 1919.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I
  • 11032

Abortion in the ancient world.

London: Duckworth, 2002.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › History of Ancient Medicine & Biology, Contraception › History of Contraception
  • 11033

Prostitution in the ancient Greek world.

New York: De Gruyter, 2017.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece › History of Ancient Medicine in Greece, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health
  • 11034

La cyrogia di Miastro Bruno: Expertissimo in quella. Tradutta in vulgare.

Venice: Simon de Luere, 1510.

Bruno da Longoburgo studied surgery in Bologna or possibly Padua, and practiced in the latter city, where he helped found the University of Padua. His Chirurgia magna, completed in 1252, antedates those of Lanfranch, Henri de Mondeville, Guy de Chauliac and Gulielmo da Saliceto, even though it did not appear in print until the end of the fifteenth century, when it was included in the Chirurgia magna (1498) of Guy de Chauliac. It was was first published separately in this 1510 Italian translation. 

Bruno’s Chirurgia magna was the first surgical treatise of its time to draw upon the works of Arabic authors, primarily Albucasis. The work is divided into two books of twenty chapters each: The first book deals with wound surgery, fractures and the nerves, while the second book discusses the surgery of specific parts (eyes, nose, lips, ears), the treatment of burns, and conditions such as hernia, cancer and bladder stones, as well as operations on the teeth and the antrum of Highmore (maxillary sinus). Bruno was “an experienced surgeon,and refer[red] many times to his own observations” (Sarton, Introduction to the History of Science, 2, p. 1077).



Subjects: DENTISTRY, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, SURGERY: General
  • 11035

Hallucinogenic plants of North America.

Berkeley, CA: Wingbow Press, 1976.


Subjects: NATIVE AMERICANS & Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › Ethnopharmacology, PSYCHIATRY › Psychopharmacology
  • 11036

Flore médicale. 7 vols.

Paris: C. L. F. Panckoucke, 18141819.

The greatest work of medical botany published during the Napoleonic period; considered a masterpiece of color print production with 425 plates printed in color and finished by hand. The medicinal aspect appears to have been loosely interpreted, and the scope of the work was expanded to include grapes, melon, palms, pineapple, pomegranates, bananas, and other interesting but non-medicinal plants. It was written by physician-botanists Chaumeton, Poiret, and Chamberet, and illustrated by Ernestine Panckoucke and Jean Francois Turpin. Only Chaumeton's name appeared as author on the title page. Panckoucke and Turpin were credited as illustrators on the title page. Digital facsimile of the 1828-1832 edition from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY, BOTANY › Botanical Illustration, BOTANY › Medical Botany
  • 11037

Origins of clinical chemistry: The evolution of protein analysis.

New York: Academic Press, 1982.


Subjects: BIOCHEMISTRY › Clinical Chemistry, BIOCHEMISTRY › History of Biochemistry
  • 11038

Hippocrate, Tome XII, 4e partie, Femmes stériles, Maladies des jeunes filles, Superfétation, Excision du foetus. Texte établi, traduit et annoté par Florence Bourbon.

Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 2017.

Edition of the Greek text with facing French translation and commentary of four gynecological treatises from the Hippocratic Collection, from c. 470-350 BCE: De sterilibus = On sterility; De virginum morbis = On diseases of virgins; De superfetatione = On superfetation; and De foetus exsectione = On excision of the fetus.

 

 


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, Hippocratic Tradition, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › GYNECOLOGY, WOMEN, Publications by, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11039

Medical practice in twelfth-century China. A translation of Xu Shuwei's Ninety discussion [cases] on cold damage disorders by Asaf Goldschmidt.

Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2019.

"An annotated translation of Xu Shuwei’s (1080–1154) collection of 90 medical case records – Ninety Discussions of Cold Damage Disorders (shanghan jiushi lun 傷寒九十論) – which was the first such collection in China. The translation reveals patterns of social as well as medical history. This book provides the readers with a distinctive first hand perspective on twelfth-century medical practice, including medical aspects, such as nosology, diagnosis, treatment, and doctrinal reasoning supporting them. It also presents the social aspect of medical practice, detailing the various participants in the medical encounter, their role, the power relations within the encounter, and the location where the encounter occurred" (publisher).

 



Subjects: Chinese Medicine
  • 11040

Origin of HIV-1 in the chimpanzee Pan troglodytes troglodytes.

Nature, 397, 436-440, 1999.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Gao, Bailes, Robertson, Hahn. Demonstration, led by Hahn, that HIV-1 originated specifically in the chimpanzee--a mutant of the chimp SIV (SIV-cpz) which acquired mutations sufficient to allow it to jump from chimpanzee to humans.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › HIV / AIDS, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11041

Chimpanzee reservoirs of pandemic and nonpandemic HIV-1.

Science, 313, 523-526, 2006.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Keele, Van Heuverswyn, Li, Hahn. Definitive proof that SIVcpz circulated and existed in wild chimps in a given area of Africa, and that a mutation of this specific SIV in Africa ignited the epidemic/pandemic of HIV-AIDs.

Digital text from PubMedCentral at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Africa, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › HIV / AIDS, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11042

The T4 glycoprotein is a cell-surface receptor for the AIDS virus.

Cold Spring Harbor Symp. quant. Biol., 51, 703-711, 1986.

Order of authorship in the original paper: McDougal, Maddon, Dalgleish. The authors discovered that the T4 lymphocyte cell has an outer glycoprotein on its surface that specifically acts as the receptor for HIV. Without first attaching to this receptor HIV cannot dock onto and penetrate the T4 lymphocyte.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Cell Biology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › HIV / AIDS, VIROLOGY
  • 11043

An amazing sequence arrangement at the 5' ends of adenovirus 2 messenger RNA.

Cell, 12, 1-8, 1977.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Chow, Gelinas, Broker, Roberts. Discovery of introns, for which Roberts and Philip Sharp received the Nobel Prize in 1993. It has been frequently suggested that Chow deserved a share of that prize. The normally inappropriate word "amazing" in the title of this paper was allowed in this particular instance by the editors of the journal Cell because of the exceptional nature of the discovery.

See also: Gelinas and Roberts, "One predominant 5--undecanucleotide in adenovirus 2 late messenger RNAs," Cell, 11 (1977) 533-544.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, VIROLOGY, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11044

Spliced segments at the 5' terminus of adenovirus 2 late mRNA.

Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. (USA), 74, 3171-3175, 1977.

Discovery of introns simultaneously with Roberts, Chow, Broker (No. 11043). Sharp's electron microscopist, Berget, visualized the introns in the electron microscope. James D. Watson took note of the profound significance of the discovery and invited both groups to present their data at the Cold Spring Harbor Symposium that year. This helped solidify the discovery by both groups as "simultaneous." For this discovery Sharp shared the Nobel Prize with Roberts in 1993.

Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this link.

(Thanks for Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, VIROLOGY, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11045

A novel prion disease associated with diarrhea and autonomic neuropathy.

New Eng. J. Med., 369, 1904-1914, 2013.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Mead, Gandhi, Beck, Collinge. Collinge was the main author. Digital facsimile from nejm.org at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Prion Diseases, NEUROLOGY › Neuropathology, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11047

Medicinal substances in Jerusalem from early times to the present day. (BAR International Series 1112).

Oxford: British Archaeological Reports, 2003.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Israel, Jews and Medicine › History of Jews and Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines › History of Materia Medica
  • 11048

Medical prescriptions in the Cambridge Genizah Collections: Practical medicine and pharmacology in medieval Egypt. Cambridge Genizah Studies Series, Volume 4.

Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2012.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Egypt, Jews and Medicine › History of Jews and Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals, RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 11049

Arabian drugs in early medieval Mediterranean medicine.

Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2016.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mediterranean, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Medieval Islamic or Arab Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals
  • 11050

Learning to heal: The medical profession in colonial Mexico, 1767-1831.

Bern, Switzerland: Peter Lang, 1997.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11051

Carving a niche: The medical profession in Mexico 1800-1870.

Montréal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2018.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11052

A woman's disease: A history of cervical cancer.

Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.


Subjects: OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › GYNECOLOGY › History of Gynecology, ONCOLOGY & CANCER › History of Oncology & Cancer, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11053

Imperfect pregnancies: A history of birth defects and prenatal diagnosis.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2017.


Subjects: Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine) › History of Forensic Medicine , OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › OBSTETRICS › History of Obstetrics, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11054

Courage under siege: Starvation, disease, and death in the Warsaw Ghetto.

New York & Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Poland, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War II, NUTRITION / DIET › History of Nutrition / Diet
  • 11055

Laennec: Catalogue des manuscrits scientifiques. By Lydie Boulle, Mirko D. Grmek, Catherine Lupovici et Janine Samion-Contet.

Paris: Masson, 1982.

Documents manuscripts by Laennec preserved in the Archives de l'Académie des Sciences, and Musée Laennec de la Bibliothèque Universitaire de Nantes, Section médecine-pharmacie.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Individual Authors, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology, INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES, PULMONOLOGY › Lung Diseases › Pulmonary Tuberculosis, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11056

A spotlight on the history of ancient Egyptian medicine.

Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2019.

A general survey with chapters that focus on the ancient Egyptian understanding and treatments of cardiovascular disease, as well as a description of herbal medicines used by ancient Egypt medical practitioners and pharmacologists.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Egypt › History of Ancient Medicine in Egypt, PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals
  • 11057

Detection and isolation of type C retrovirus particles from fresh and cultured lymphocytes of a patient with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. (USA),77, 7415-7419, 1980.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Poiesz, Ruscetti,... Gallo. Gallo and associates announced the discovery of a human retrovirus with type C morphology causing a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Gallo named this virus HTLV-1 (for Human T-cell Leukemia-Lymphoma Virus - 1). Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › HTLV-1 (Human T cell Leukemia-Lymphoma Virus-1), ONCOLOGY & CANCER, ONCOLOGY & CANCER › Lymphoma, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Retroviridae › HTLV-1
  • 11058

A new subtype of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-II) associated with a T-cell variant of hairy cell leukemia.

Science, 218, 571-573, 1982.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Kalyanaraman, Sarngadharan,... Gallo. Discovery by Gallo of HTLV-II, which like HTLV-I, is carcinogenic.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › HTLV-2, ONCOLOGY & CANCER › Leukemia, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Retroviridae
  • 11059

A new type of retrovirus isolated from patients presenting with lymphadenopathy and acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Structural and antigenic relatedness with equine infectious anemia virus.

Annales de l'Institut Pasteur / Virologie, 135E, 119-134, 1984.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Montagnier, Dauguet,... Barré-Sinoussi. In this paper Montagnier and colleagues showed that, contrary to the views of Gallo and his group, LAV (Lymphadenopathy Associated Virus) was not antigenically related to HTLV, that it was very antigenically and morphologically related to EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus), a lentivirus, and that the p25 protein of LAV is not related to the p24 protein of HTLV. They also showed that the EM morphology of LAV is very similar to EIAV, as are its dimensions, that LAV has a strict tropism for OKT4 helper lymphocytes (See No. 11042). They also showed that when LAV infects a cell line it is lytic for those cells, whereas HTLVs immortalize the cells.

See also the following paper by the authors presented at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories on September 15, 1983: "A new human lymphotropic retrovirus: Characterization and possible role in lymphadenopathy and acquired immune deficiency syndromes," published as pp.363-369 in Gallo, R.C.; Essex, M., Gross, L., eds., Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus. Cold Spring Harbor, NY, 1984.

(Thanks for Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › HIV / AIDS, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Retroviridae, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11060

Structure of the protein subunit in the photosynthetic reaction centre of Rhodopseudomonas viridis at 3 Å resolution.

Nature, 318, 618-624, 1985.

Discovery of the three-dimensional structure of a protein complex found in certain photosynthetic bacteria, called the photosynthetic reaction center, for which the authors shared the Nobel Prize in 1988. This was the first elucidation of the 3D crystal structure of any membrane protein complex. The authors used X-ray crystallography to determine the exact arrangement of the 10,000 atoms in this protein complex. Photosynthesis has been called "the most important chemical reaction in the biosphere."

For the first time understanding of processes in bacterial cells elucidated a complex chemical reaction that had hitherto only been studied in plant cells.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this entry and its interpretation).



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, BIOLOGY › Ecology / Environment › Photosynthesis, BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
  • 11061

Uroscopy in Middle English: A guide to the texts and manuscripts. Studies in medieval and Renaissance History, 3rd Series, Vol. 11.

Tucson, AZ: AMS Press, 2014.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11062

Sex, aging, & death in a medieval medical compendium. Trinity College Cambridge MS R.14.52, its texts, language and scribe. Edited by M. Teresa Tavormina.

Tucson, AZ: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2006.


Subjects: GERIATRICS / Gerontology / Aging, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England, SEXUALITY / Sexology, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11063

Internationaler biographischer Index der Medizin : Arzte, Naturheilkundler, Veterinarmediziner und Apotheker. 3 vols.

Munich: K. G. Saur, 1996.


Subjects: ALTERNATIVE, Complimentary & Pseudomedicine › Homeopathy › History of Homeopathy, BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works), VETERINARY MEDICINE › History of Veterinary Medicine
  • 11064

Dictionnaire historique des médecins dans et hors de la médecine.

Paris: Larouse, 1999.


Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works)
  • 11065

Les musées de médecine: Histoire, patrimoine et grandes figures de la médecine en France.

Paris: Privat, 1999.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, MUSEUMS › History of Museums
  • 11066

Nos hôpitaux Parisiens. Un siècle d'histoire hospitalière. Deux siècles d'histoire hôpitalière de Henri IV à Louis-Philippe (1602-1836). 2 vols.

Paris: Paul Dupont, 1947.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, HOSPITALS › History of Hospitals
  • 11067

Napoleon Ier et ses médecins.

Paris: Harmattan, 2012.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Napoleon's Campaigns & Wars
  • 11068

Chirurgie dentaire et nazisme.

Paris: Harmattan, 2015.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Germany, DENTISTRY › History of Dentistry, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War II
  • 11069

Science is not a quiet life: Unravelling the atomic mechanism of haemoglobin.

Singapore: World Publishing Company, 1997.

Reprints landmark papers with commentary by Perutz.



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › History of Molecular Biology
  • 11070

Histoire de la biologie moléculaire.

Paris: Editions de la Découverte, 1994.

Translated into English by Matthew Cobb as A history of molecular biology. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998.



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › History of Molecular Biology
  • 11071

Tobacco mosaic virus: Pioneering research for a century. A theme issue edited by B. D. Harrison and T. M. A. Wilson.

Phil. Trans., Ser. B, 354, 517-685, 1999.


Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY, BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › History of Molecular Biology, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Tobacco, VIROLOGY › History of Virology, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Virgaviridae › Tobacco Mosaic Virus
  • 11072

De l'homicide et de l'anthropophagie.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière, 1856.

One of the earliest works on cannibalism, and probably the first work to combine a discussion of homicide and cannibalism from the medical viewpoint. The author, who was very widely read on these subjects, searched for cures for both phenomena.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Social Anthropology, Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine)
  • 11073

The rhetoric of medicine: Lessons on professionalism from ancient Greece.

New York: Oxford University Press, 2019.

A collaboration between a classicist (Nicholson) and a neurosurgeon (Selden). The text is divided into 7 chapters covering the general topics of "body, money, competition, restriction, autonomy, mentoring, self."



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece › History of Ancient Medicine in Greece, Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, Ethics, Biomedical › History of Biomedical Ethics
  • 11074

Identification of a novel cell type in peripheral lymphoid organs in mice. I. Morphology, quantitation, tissue distribution.

J. exp. Med., 137, 1142-1162, 1973.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Steinman, Cohn. In this paper Steinman announced his discovery of the dendritic cell. For the discovery of this cell and its role in adaptive immunity Steinman shared the Nobel Prize in 2011. Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Cell Biology, IMMUNOLOGY
  • 11075

Quantitative field studies on a carbon dioxide chemotropism of mosquitoes.

Am. J. Trop. Med. & Hygiene, 2, 325-331, 1953.

Reeves demonstrated that mosquitoes detect their prey by sensing the carbon dioxide that animals exhale. (It was later shown that some mosquitoes can detect their prey from more than 165 feet away.)

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE, ZOOLOGY › Arthropoda › Entomology
  • 11076

Odorant reception in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

Nature, 464, 66-71, 2010.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Carey, Wang, ... Carlson. The authors showed that besides CO2, the odorant receptors in the malaria mosquistoes Anopheles gambiae are sensitive to other "mostly sweat" organic compounds like "1-octen-3-ol", which is very common in human and animal odor. These receptors play a central role in human recognition in the human host-seeking behavior of these mosquitoes.

Digital facsimile from PubMedCentral at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Africa, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Malaria, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -, ZOOLOGY › Arthropoda › Entomology
  • 11077

Further report on the tsetse fly disease or nagana, in Zululand.

London: Harrison & Sons, 1896.

In this more-detailed follow-up to his "preliminary" paper of 1895 published in Durban, South Africa, Bruce provided definitive proof that the Trypanosoma was the cause of nagana, and the tsetse fly was the vector of transmission. He showed the part of the tsetse fly which took part in causation of nagana, described the trypanosoma, proved the connection between big game and spread of the disease, and provided a treatment for the disease (prophylactic and curative) using arsenic in the animals. 

In this paper Bruce also credited Lady Bruce, a trained laboratory technician, for help with the experiments. Sir David and Lady Bruce comprised the complete team in the "First British Nagana Commission to Zululand." Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › South Africa, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tsetse Fly-Borne Diseases › Sleeping Sickness (African Trypanosomiasis), TROPICAL Medicine
  • 11078

De l'influence des découvertes de M. Pasteur sur les progrès de la chirurgie.

Comptes rendus de l'Académie des Sciences, 86, 634-640, 1878.

Sedillot, a surgeon, first used the word "microbe" on p. 634, third paragraph, of this paper. He coined the term after consulting with lexicographer Émile Littré, to ascertain etymological appropriateness. Shortly thereafter Pasteur used the term in a paper with Chamberland and Joubert in the same journal (pp. 1037-1043).

Digital facsimile from BnF.gallica at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: MICROBIOLOGY
  • 11079

Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections: Clinical description of the first 50 cases.

Am. J. Psychiatry, 155, 264-271, 1998.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Swedo, Leonard, Garvey.... Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS), "an hypothesis that there exists a subset of children with rapid onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or tic disorders and these symptoms are caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infections.[1] The proposed link between infection and these disorders is that an initial autoimmune reaction to a GABHS infection produces antibodies that interfere with basal ganglia function, causing symptom exacerbations. It has been proposed that this autoimmune response can result in a broad range of neuropsychiatric symptoms.[2][3] PANDAS is a subset of the pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) hypothesis." (Wikipedia aritlce on PANDAS).



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE, NEUROLOGY › Child Neurology, PEDIATRICS, PSYCHIATRY › Child Psychiatry, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11080

Brill's companion to the reception of Galen. Edited by Petros Bouras-Vallianatos and Barbara Zipser.

Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2019.

This collective work shows how Galen was adopted, adapted, admired, contested, and criticized across diverse intellectual environments and geographical regions, from Late Antiquity to the present day, and from Europe to North Africa, the Middle and the Far East. 



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Late Antiquity, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, BYZANTINE MEDICINE › History of Byzantine Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11081

Methodus medendi [and Ad Glauconem.]

Venice: Z. Callierges for Nicolaus Blastos, 1500.

Klebs 433.1. These were the first genuine texts of Galen published in print in the original Greek.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 11082

Shock and awe: The performance dimension of Galen's anatomy demonstrations. (Version 5; January 2007.)

Princeton/Stanford Working Papers in Classics, 2007.

Digital edition available from princeton.edu at this link: http://www.princeton.edu/~pswpc/pdfs/gleason/010702.pdf



Subjects: ANATOMY › Ancient Anatomy (BCE to 5th Century CE), ANATOMY › History of Anatomy, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11083

De compositione medicamentorum... lib VII per Ioannem Guinterium Andernacum imprimum latinitate donati. Eiusdem De ponderibus & mensuris liber, D. Andrea Alciato interprete.

Basel : Andreas Cratander, 1530.

First separate edition in Latin of Galen's De compositione medicamentorum, On the Composition of medicines, translated by Johann Winter of Andernach, to which was added Galen's treatise on weights and measures translated by humanist Andrea Alciato. 

Durling cites another edition of Guinter's translation published in Paris by Simon de Colines, also in 1530.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire, BOTANY › Medical Botany, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS
  • 11084

Greek manuscripts at the Wellcome Library in London: A descriptive catalogue. By Petros Bouras-Vallianatos with contributions by Georgi R. Parpulov.

Medical History, 59, 275-326, 2015.

Detailed bibliographical descriptions of the 16 manuscripts then owned by the Wellcome Library, including several from the collections of Anthony Askew (1722-1774), who acquired his in the dispersal of the library of Richard Mead (1673-1754). Most are medieval and fall into the category of Byzantine and post-Byzantine iatrosophia, a "type of physician's handbook consisting of simple recipes for use in daily practice."

Digital facsimile from journals.cambridge.org at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Manuscripts & Philology, BYZANTINE MEDICINE › History of Byzantine Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE
  • 11085

A history of plastic surgery.

Berlin & Heidelberg: Springer, 2007.


Subjects: PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY › History of Plastic Surgery
  • 11086

Faces from the front: Harold Gillies, the Queen’s Hospital, Sidcup and the origins of modern plastic surgery.

Solihull, England: Helion & Company, 2017.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I, PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY › History of Plastic Surgery
  • 11087

On the action of organic acids and their anydrides on the natural alkaloïds. Part I.

J. chem. Soc., 27, 1031-1043, 1874.

In quest of a non-addictive alternative to morphine, Wright experimented with combining morphine with various acids. He boiled anhydrous morphine alkaloid with acetic anhydride over a stove for several hours and produced a more potent, acetylated form of morphine, now called diamorphine (or diacetylmorphine), also known as heroin. After Wright's death, Heinrich Dreser, a chemist at Bayer Laboratories, continued to test heroin. Bayer marketed it as an analgesic[3] and 'sedative for coughs' in 1898. When its addictive potential was recognized, Bayer ceased its production in 1913. (Wikipedia article Charles Romley Alder Wright).

Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Opium › Morphine › Heroin
  • 11088

A history of the mind and mental health in classical Greek medical thought.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2017.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece › History of Ancient Medicine in Greece, PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11089

Mental illness in ancient medicine: From Celsus to Paul of Aegina. Edited by Chiara Thumiger and Peter Singer.

Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2018.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › History of Ancient Medicine & Biology, PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11090

Les main mutilées dans l'art prehistorique.

Toulouse: M. T. E., 1966.

A comprehensive study by a physician of the numerous tracings and impressions of mutilated hands that appear in prehistoric painted caves or parietal art.



Subjects: EVOLUTION › Human Origins / Human Evolution › History of, PATHOLOGY › Paleopathology
  • 11091

Disease in ancient man: A report of an international symposium on disease in ancient man. Edited by Gerald D. Hart.

Toronto, Canada: Clarke Irwin, 1983.


Subjects: PATHOLOGY › Paleopathology
  • 11092

Asclepius, the god of medicine.

London & Lake Forest, IL: Royal Society of Medicine, 2000.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece › History of Ancient Medicine in Greece, RELIGION & Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 11093

Die Spermatozoen einiger Wirbelthiere. Ein Beitrag zur Histochemie.

Verh. naturf. Ges. Basel, 6, 138-208, 1874.

Miescher first isolated DNA and identified it as an acid through chemical analysis of salmon spermatozoa.  See Ralf Dahm, "Discovering DNA: Friedrich Miescher and the early years of nucleic acid research," Human Genetics, 122 (2008) 565-581.



Subjects: BIOCHEMISTRY, BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Nucleic Acids
  • 11094

Die histochemischen und physiologischen Arbeiten. 2 vols.

Leipzig: F. C. W. Vogel, 1897.

In a letter to his uncle, the embryologist, Wilhelm His, written on December 17, 1892, and first published in this collected edition, Miescher described a kind of genetic code. He remarked how "some of the large molecules encountered in biology, composed of a repetition of a few similar but not identical small chemical pieces, could express all the right variety of the hereditary message, 'just as the words and concepts of all languages can find expression in twenty-four to thirty letters of the alphabet" (Judson, The eighth day of creation. Makers of the revolution in biology, p. 28). Miescher's letter to Wilhelm His was first published in vol. 1, pp. 116-17 of this work.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIOCHEMISTRY, BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genetic Code, BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Nucleic Acids, Collected Works: Opera Omnia
  • 11095

Deliciae Cobresianae. J. P. Cobres Büchersammlung zur Naturgeschichte. 2 vols.

Augsburg: auf Kosten des Verfassers, 1782.

Privately printed catalogue of Cobres’ natural history library, comprising descriptions, with collations and notes, of about 2500 books on botany, zoology, geology, etc. The catalogue is divided into subject sections and includes sections on conchology, microscopy and ‘Musea’ or Wunderkammern. On this topic it lists 107 titles listed, and is one of the earliest bibliographies of museum catalogues.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Physicians' / Scientists' Libraries, MUSEUMS › Natural History Museums / Wunderkammern, NATURAL HISTORY › History of Natural History
  • 11096

Art anatomy.

Boston, MA: Little, Brown, 1877.

Perhaps the first great American anatomy for artists by an American painter and sculptor. Rimmer not only drew the 900 drawings on the 81 heliotype plates, but he also wrote in the explanatory text on the sheets along with the drawings. The first edition is an oblong folio. According to the slightly reduced format second edition of 1884 much of the first edition was destroyed in a fire in 1879.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Anatomy for Artists, ART & Medicine & Biology
  • 11097

Der Londoner medizinische Papyrus (Brit. Museum 10 059) und der Papyrus Hearst in Transkription, Übersetzung und Kommentar. Herausgegeben von Walther Wreszinski. Mit Facsimile der Londoner Pap. auf 17 Lichtdrucktafeln.

Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs, 1912.

The London Medical Papyrus contains "61 recipes, of which 25 are classified as medical while the remainder are of magic.[1] The medical foci of the writing are skin complaints, eye complaints, bleeding[2] (predominantly with the intent of preventing miscarriage through magical methods) and burns." Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Egypt, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Medical Papyri
  • 11098

Epitome on the nature of man. Edited by Robert Renehan. Corpus Medicorum Graecorum 10/4.

Berlin: De Gruyter, 1969.

Leo the Physician was a medical encyclopedist; traditionally dated to 9th century, but possibly as late as 12th–13th century CE. His Epitome survives in only one manuscript, possibly because Leo avoided theological discussions and streamlined his text for students who were probably learning medicine in the hospitals of Constantinople.



Subjects: BYZANTINE MEDICINE
  • 11099

Des moyens de conserver la santé des blancs et des négres, aux Antilles ou climats chauds et humides de l'Amerique. Contenant un exposé des causes des malades propres....

Saint-Domingue & Paris: Méguignon l'aîné, 1786.

Bertin practiced medicine in the West Indies, and wrote about the physical effects of the voyage there, the causes of diseases and their cures, and the effects of the Caribbean climate and humidity on health. The imprint suggests that Bertin wrote the book in Santo Domingo (Haiti), and likely hoped to market it there, as it was of practical use in the West Indies. Digital facsimile (of a copy lacking the title page) from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Caribbean, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Haiti, Slavery and Medicine