An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15426 entries, 13280 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 20, 2021

Browse by Entry Number 11300–11399

99 entries
  • 11300

Musée Vrolik. Catalogue de la collection d'anatomie humaine, comparée et pathologique de M.M. Ger. et W. Vrolik. par J. L. Dusseau.

Amsterdam: Imprimerie de W. J. de Roever Kröber, 1865.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological
  • 11301

Catalogue of the pathological museum of Prof. T. D. Mutter.

Philadelphia: [Privately Printed], 1856.

Digital facsimile from U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological
  • 11302

Catalogue of the surgical and pathological museum of Valentine Mott and of his son Alexander B. Mott.

New York: Wm. M. Taylor, Book and Job Printer, 1858.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological
  • 11303

Inescapable ecologies: A history of environment, disease, and knowledge.

Berkeley & Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2007.

"Among the most far-reaching effects of the modern environmental movement was the widespread acknowledgment that human beings were inescapably part of a larger ecosystem." This book provides a "history of “ecological” ideas of the body as that history unfolded in California’s Central Valley. Taking us from nineteenth-century fears of miasmas and faith in wilderness cures to the recent era of chemical pollution and cancer clusters, Nash charts how Americans have connected their diseases to race and place as well as dirt and germs. In this account, the rise of germ theory and the pushing aside of an earlier environmental approach to illness constituted not a clear triumph of modern biomedicine but rather a brief period of modern amnesia. As Nash shows us, place-based accounts of illness re-emerged in the postwar decades, galvanizing environmental protest against smog and toxic chemicals" (publisher).



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Ecology / Environment › History of Ecology / Environment, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › California, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11304

Report on the medical topography and epidemics of California.

Philadelphia: Collins, Printer, 1859.

Logan provided an updated report with the same title in 1865. Digital facsimile of the 1865 report from U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, Geography of Disease / Health Geography, Topography, Medical, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › California
  • 11305

Medical history of the year 1868, in California. A paper read before the "Sacramento Society for Medical Improvement," February 16th, 1869. And published by order of the society.

San Francisco, CA: Printed by F. Clarke, 1869.

Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, Topography, Medical, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › California
  • 11306

Constitution, by-laws and fee bill of the San Francisco Medical Society: Organized June 22, 1850.

San Francisco, CA: Printed at the office of the California Daily Courier, 1850.

This 8-page pamphlet is one of the earliest separate publications relating to medicine printed in the State of California. The "Society" disbanded shortly after this was published, perhaps over disputes concerning the "fee bill" listed in the pamphlet. Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link. (Another copy is recorded at the Huntington Library, San Marino, CA.) Reprinted in facsimile with a prefatory note by Carey S. Bliss. Los Angeles: Zamorano Club, 1980.



Subjects: ECONOMICS, BIOMEDICAL, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › California
  • 11307

Something about California: Being a description of its climate, health, wealth and resources, compressed into small compass: Marin County: Its industries, roads, appearance, health and population, also, a series of carefully written and well considered articles and paragraphs describing the sanatarium of San Rafael in which the mildness and equability of its climate are explained.

San Rafael, CA: San Rafael Herald, 1875.

This 32-page pamphlet was probably the first separate publication concerning health matters in Marin County, California, my county of residence during the years in which I wrote this online bibliography-- J.M.N.

Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: Biogeography, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › California
  • 11308

A catalogue descriptive chiefly of the morbid preparations contained in the museum of Manchester Theatre of Anatomy and Medicine, Marsden Street. With occasional explanatory remarks.

Manchester: Printed by Harrison and Crosfield, 1833.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological
  • 11309

On the brain of the negro, compared with that of the European and the orang-outang.

Phil. Trans., 126, 497-526, 1836.

In this very thoroughly researched, highly documented, and well-illustrated paper Tiedemann demonstrated that there are no significant anatomical differences between the brains and mental capacities of Black people and White people.

"I take the liberty of presenting to the Royal Society a paper on a subject which appears to me to be of great importance in the natural history, anatomy, and physiology of Man; interesting also in a political and legislative point of view. Celebrated naturalists, Camper, Soemmerring, and Cuvier, look upon the Negroes as a race inferior to the European in organization and intellectual powers, having much resemblance with the Monkey. Naturalists of less authority have exaggerated this opinion. Were it proved to be correct, the negro would occupy a different situation in society from that which has so lately been given him by the noble British Government. I propose in this treatise to examine more minutely the most important part of this doctrine, namely, the structure of the brain, the noblest part of the human body, in reference to its functions. A comparison between the brain of the Negro and that of the European and the Orang-Outang, hitherto much neglected, appeared to me most worthy of attention. I shall first of all try to answer the following two questions.

"1st, Is there any impotant and essential difference between the structure of the brain of the Negro and that of the European? and

"2ndly, Has the brain of the Negro more resememblance to that of the Orang-Outang than the brain of the European?

"Should our researches induce us to answer these questions in the affirmative, we should then have reason to consider the opinion given above as true, and founded in nature. Should we be able to pove the falsity of this opinion, we should then be allowed to consider it as a mere literary fancy....(pp. 497-98).

"The intellectual faculties of the Negroes do not in general seem to be inferior to those of the European and other races. Such of them as are not bodily and morally degraded by slavery and oppression, have a pleasing and open xpression of coutenance, and are of a gay and cheeful turn. They exhibit proofs of good natural capacity, good sense, wit and penetration....many instances of Negroes who made a cetain progress in the liberal arts and sciences, and distinguished themselves as clergymen, philosophers, amthematicians, philogians, hsitorians, advocates medical men, poets, and musicians. Many Negroes ahve distingusiehd themselves by their talents in military tacts and politics....

"The principle result of my researches on the brain of the Negro, is, that neither anatomy nor physiology can justify our placing them beneath the Europeans in a moral or intellectual point of view...." (p. 525).

Digital facsimile from the Royal Society at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy, ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy › Comparative Neuroanatomy, ANTHROPOLOGY › Craniology, ANTHROPOLOGY › Physical Anthropology
  • 11310

Anatomical cabinet, belonging to R. D. Mussey, M.D., Professor of Surgery in the Medical College of Ohio. Printed for the use of pupils.

Cincinnati, OH (?): [Privately Printed], circa 1838.

This 20-page pamphlet described Mussey's personal collection of anatomical and pathological specimens.  No place of printing or date of publication is indicated in the pamphlet; because of the reference to the Medical College of Ohio, the pamphlet would have been issued after Mussey moved to Cincinnati in 1838. Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological , U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Ohio
  • 11311

Health: Its friends and foes.

Boston: Gould and Lincoln, 1862.

This work, which promoted vegetarianism and abstinence from tobacco along with other hygiene and overall health advice, was written as the author stated in his preface, "to meet the comprehension of the general reader, and, at the same time, to present some suggestions which, it is hoped, the young physician may find not wholly beneath his regard."

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Household or Self-Help Medicine, Hygiene, NUTRITION / DIET, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Tobacco
  • 11312

Museum anatomicum academiae Lugduno-Batavae. 4 vols.

Leiden: S. & J. Luchtmans, 17931835.

This work, complete in over 1000 pages, with hundreds of full page plates, was begun by Eduard Sandifort and completed 42 years later by his son Gerard. Many of the plates illustrate diseases of bone. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological , PATHOLOGY › Pathology Illustration
  • 11313

The finger of God: Anatomical practice in seventeenth-century Leiden.

Leiden: Primavera Press, 2009.


Subjects: ANATOMY › 17th Century, ANATOMY › History of Anatomy, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Netherlands
  • 11314

Catalogus rerum memorabilium quae in theatro anatomico academia, quae Lugduni Batavorum floret, demonstantur per Franciscum Schuyl.

Leiden: Apud Deboram vander Boxe, 1721.

Numerous editions and translations of the catalogue of the anatomical museum of the University of Leiden were published, probably to supply the needs of medical students from various countries. Digital facsimile of the 1738 Latin edition at this link. The work was translated into English as A catalogue of all the chiefest rarities in the publick Anatomie-Hall, of the University of Leiden, by Francis Schuyl. (Leiden: Diewertje vander Boxe, 1732). Digital facsimile of the 1732 English translation from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 18th Century, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Netherlands, MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological
  • 11315

Report on the state of the anatomical museum of the University of Pennsylvania, 30th June, 1824.

Philadelphia: Published by Order of the Trustees, 1824.

This 36-page pamphlet is the earliest printed record of Caspar Wispar's museum collection. It was augmented by William Horner, whom Wistar appointed to manage the collection. The combined collections beame known as the Wistar and Horner Museum. Later the collections were managed by Joseph Leidy. In 1892 they became the fondation of the Wistar Institute, the first independent medical research facility in the United States. Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological , U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Pennsylvania
  • 11316

Hand-book & descriptive catalogue of the Pacific Museum of Anatomy and Natural Science, now open at the Eureka Theatre, Montgomery St., between California and Pine, San Francisco.

San Francisco, CA: [Privately Printed], circa 1865.

A commercial medical and "natural science" museum operated by Jordan. This may have been the earliest commercial medical museum in California. Pages 50 onward describe what Jordan called the "Pathological Room, For reference and use of Medical Gentlemen and Students-only." "The wages of Sin is Death." This facility, which was presumably off-limits to women, clearly was intended to elicit guilt regarding sexuality, and to dramatize venereal disease, and "diseases caused by masturbation," and to encourage visitors to consult Dr. Jordan for a cure. Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological , SEXUALITY / Sexology, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › California
  • 11317

Catalogue of the natural productions and curiosities, which compose the collections of the Cabinet of Natural History, opened for public exhibition, at No. 38, William-Street, New-York.

New York: Printed by Isaac Collins and Son, 1804.

One of the first natural history museums in the U.S., supported by subscription. According to the text, David Hosack and Wright Post were among the supporters of the project. The copy at the U.S. National Library of Medicine bears Hosack's signature. Digital facsimile of Hosack's copy at NLM at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Natural History Museums / Wunderkammern
  • 11318

Catalogue of the New-York Museum of Anatomy No. 618 Broadway, New-York. Principals: Drs. Jordan & Beck No. 40 Bond Street. Open daily, for gentlemn only, from 10 A.M. till 10 P. M. Admission, 25 cents.

New York: Bloom & Smith, 1863.

30-page catalogue of a commercial medical museum "for gentlemen only" and clearly operated as an advertisement for Jordan and Beck's medical practice. A great deal of the displayed material was intended to be titillating in view of the limited information about female anatomy available to most people at the time. The exhibits also pointed to the evils of masturbation, and other sexual issues,  alluded to the "cures" available in the medical practice of the authors in advertisements at the end of the brochure.

Digital facsimile from the U.S.National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological , SEXUALITY / Sexology
  • 11319

Regii in academia ad Albim musei anatomici Augustei catalogus universalis praeparata anatomica Ruyschiana variorumque celeberrimorum auctorum tam sicca, quam in liquore contenta foetus, monstra, sceleta et artefacta exhibens. Cum oratione de museis....Abrahamus Vater.

Wittenberg: Officina Henningiana, 1736.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: MUSEUMS › Medical, Anatomical & Pathological
  • 11320

A system of anatomy or the use of students of medicine. 2 vols.

Philadelphia: Thomas Dobson, 18111813.

The first American textbook of anatomy. The first edition contained nearly 1000 pages of text, but no illustrations. Later editions were expanded, illustrated and updated by William E. Horner, and Joseph Pancoast. Digital facsimile of the first edition from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 19th Century
  • 11321

Rum maniacs: Alcoholic insanity in the Early American Republic.

Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2014.


Subjects: PSYCHIATRY › History of Psychiatry, TOXICOLOGY › Drug Addiction › History of Drug Addiction
  • 11322

Demography in early America: Beginnings of the statistical mind 1600-1800.

Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1969.

Covering the period 1600–1800, the author deals with demography in its economic, political, and social aspects.  The work is particularly concerned with the development of health-related and scientific aspects of demography, and examines parish registers, church records and colonial legislation pertaining to vital statistics.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics › History of Demography
  • 11323

Medicine and American growth, 1800-1860.

Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1986.

 "The interconnections between population increase, migration and immigration on the one hand, and disease and the development of medicine on the other in antebellum America are brilliantly presented" (publisher)



Subjects: DEMOGRAPHY / Population: Medical Statistics › History of Demography, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 11324

The infant welfare movement in the eighteenth century.

New York: Paul B. Hoeber, 1930.


Subjects: PEDIATRICS › History of Pediatrics, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 11325

Highlights in the development of medical history in the United States (Materials from an exhibit).

Bethesda, MD: U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1984.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY , Historiography of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 11326

History of medicine from the earliest ages to the commencement of the nineteenth century. By Robley Dunglison. Arranged and edited by Richard J. Dunglison.

Philadelphia: Lindsay & Blakiston, 1872.

In 1824 Dunglison was recuited to join the Medical Faculty of the new University of Virginia. There he became Thomas Jefferson's personal physician for two years until Jefferson's death.

Dunglison was hired to teach medical history as well as anatomy, physiology, surgery and materia medica. Delivered annually between 1824 and 1833, Dunglison's lectures on medical history represented the earliest course on the history of medicine known to have been given in the United States. They were first published by Dunglison's son in 1872.  Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: Historiography of Medicine & the Life Sciences , History of Medicine: General Works
  • 11327

From medical police to social medicine.

New York: Science History Publications, 1974.


Subjects: PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health, Social or Sociopolitical Histories of Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 11328

Literature and medicine, vol. 1- . Edited by Anne Hudson Jones.

Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1982.

"Founded in 1982, Literature and Medicine is a peer-reviewed journal publishing scholarship that explores representational and cultural practices concerning health care and the body. Areas of interest include disease, illness, health, and disability; violence, trauma, and power relations; and the cultures of biomedical science and technology and of the clinic, as these are represented and interpreted in verbal, visual, and material texts. Literature and Medicine features one thematic and one general issue each year. Past theme issues have explored identity and difference; contagion and infection; cancer pathography; the representations of genomics; and the narration of pain. Literature and Medicine is co-sponsored by the Institute for the Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and the Program in Medical Humanities and Bioethics at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine" (publisher).

Vol. 37 was published in 2019.



Subjects: Ethics, Biomedical, Humanities, Medical, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology, Periodicals Specializing in the History of Medicine & the Life Sciences, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11329

Das Gebiss des Menschen und der Anthropomorphen. Vergleichend anatomische Untersuchungen.

Berlin & Heidelberg: Springer, 1908.


Subjects: ANTHROPOLOGY › Physical Anthropology, DENTISTRY › Dental Anatomy & Physiology, EVOLUTION › Human Origins / Human Evolution
  • 11330

La publicité suggestive théorie et technique.

Paris: H. Dunod et E. Pinat, 1911.

Probably the first book on the application of hynosis in advertising. Gérin was professor at the Institut commercial de Paris, and his book was published in a series on "Les procedés modernes de vente." His book included many examples of suggestion used in signage and print advertising.



Subjects: PSYCHOTHERAPY › Hypnosis
  • 11331

Alchemy and the occult; a catalogue of books and manuscripts from the collection of Paul and Mary Mellon given to Yale University Library. Compiled by Ian MacPhail, with essays by R. P. Multhauf and Aniela Jaffé and additional notes by William McGuire. 4 vols.

New Haven, CT: Yale University Library, 19681977.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Subjects, Chemistry › Alchemy, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11332

Catalogue of the Ferguson collection of books mainly relating to alchemy, chemistry, witchcraft and gypsies in the Library of the University of Glasgow. 2 vols. including Supplement (1955).

Glasgow: Maclehose, 19431955.

Due to wartime paper rationing only 40 copies of the first printing of the catalogue were published when it was issued in 1943; it was reprinted in the 21st century. Ferguson is best known as the author of the extensively annotated catalogue of the Young collection of alchemy and early chemistry. However, this catalogue of around 7500 items on 900 pages demonstrates that Ferguson's personal library surpassed that of Young in various respects.

 


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Subjects, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Physicians' / Scientists' Libraries, Chemistry, Chemistry › Alchemy
  • 11333

Découverte d’un squelette humain de l’époque paléolithique dans les cavernes des Baoussé-Roussé dites grottes de Menton.

Paris: J.-B. Baillière et fils & Menton: chez l'Auteur, 1873.

In March 1872 Rivière discovered an entire fossil human skeleton in a cave at Menton, in the south of France near the Italian border. The skeleton, later known as “Menton man,” closely resembles the Cro-Magnon remains, later classified as European Early Modern Humans, from the Dordogne region. Rivière had the skeleton photographed in situ by Anfossi and Radiguet; two of their superb original photographs serve as plates to the present work. These appear to be the earliest published photographs of fossil humans. 

The Menton skeleton was displayed at the Natural History Museum in Paris in 1872; it was the first fossil human to be presented to the public in a museum in France or possibly anywhere.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: EVOLUTION › Human Origins / Human Evolution, IMAGING › Photography / Photomicrography
  • 11334

Musée préhistorique. By Gabriel and Adrien Mortillet.

Paris: C. Reinwald, 1881.

This atlas of 100 plates containing roughly 800 individual images, with accompanying text, was both a comprehensive atlas of then-known prehistoric artifact types and an attempt at their classification. Until 1902 the scientific establishment rejected the authenticity of prehistoric cave paintings. In the 1903 second edition, the work was revised and expanded to 105 plates by Adrien de Mortillet to include recent discoveries on cave paintings, the legitimacy of which had been accepted in 1902 by Emil Cartailhac and other authorities.

Digital facsimile of the 1881 edition from the Internet Archive at this link; facsimile of the 1903 edition from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: EVOLUTION › Human Origins / Human Evolution
  • 11335

Characterization of the reconstructed 1918 Spanish Influenza Pandemic virus.

Science, 310, 77-80, 2005.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Tumpey, Basler, Aguilar... Taubenberger. Reconstruction of the genome of the 1918 Spanish Influenza virus from frozen tissue samples from a mass grave of victims of the 1918 epidemic unearthed from the permafrost at Brevig Mission, Alaska. This and the following paper published in Nature were the culmination of a series of papers published on the pathogenomics of this exceptionally virulent virus by Taubenberger and colleagues from 1997 to 2005.

The authors published a paper in Nature simultaneously with the above-cited 2005 paper in Science: Taubenberger, Ann H. Reid, Rain M. Lourens et al, "Characterization of the 1918 influenza virus polymerase gene," Nature, 437 (2005) 889-893.

In January 2005 Taubenberger, Ann H. Reid, and Thomas G. Fanning also published a paper in Scientific American recounting the unusual history of this research, entitled  "Capturing a killer flu virus." 

The CDC provided an informative history of this research by Douglas Jordan with contributions from Terrence Tumpey and Barbara Jester: "The deadliest flu: The complete story of the discovery and reconstruction of the 1918 pandemic virus," https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-resources/reconstruction-1918-virus.html

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genomics › Pathogenomics, EPIDEMIOLOGY › Pandemics › Influenza › 1918 Pandemic (H1N1 virus), INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Orthomyxoviridae › Influenza A Virus › Influenza A virus subtype H1N1, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11336

Genome sequence of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

Nature, 419, 498-511, 2002.

Order of authorship in the original paper: Gardner, Hall, Fung.... Genome of the Plasmodium falciparum parasite carried by the mosquito that causes malaria in humans.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genomics › Pathogenomics, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Malaria, PARASITOLOGY › Molecular Parasitology, PARASITOLOGY › Plasmodia › P. vivax, P. falciparum, P. malariae, P. ovale, and P. knowlesi, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11337

The genome sequence of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

Science, 298, 129-149, 2002.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Holt, Subramanian, Halpern.... Sequence of the genome of Anopheles gambiae, the mosquito that carries the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genomics › Pathogenomics, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Malaria, PARASITOLOGY › Plasmodia, ZOOLOGY › Arthropoda › Entomology
  • 11338

Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major arbovirus vector.

Science, 316, 1718-1722, 2007.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Nene, Wortman, Lawson....

Sequence of the genome of the mosquito that transmits Zika, Yellow fever, Dengue, Chikungunya, etc.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genomics › Pathogenomics, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Dengue Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Zika Virus Disease, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Flaviviridae › Yellow Fever Virus, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -, ZOOLOGY › Arthropoda › Entomology
  • 11339

The genome of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei.

Science, 309, 416-422, 2005.

Genome of the parasite that causes Sleeping Sickness.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genomics › Pathogenomics, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tsetse Fly-Borne Diseases › Sleeping Sickness (African Trypanosomiasis), PARASITOLOGY › Molecular Parasitology, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11340

Genome sequence of the Tsetse Fly (Glossina morsitans): Vector of African Tyrpanosomiasis.

Science, 344, 380-386, 2014.

The Internation Glossina Genome Initiative consisted of 179 collaborators.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genomics › Pathogenomics, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Triatomine Bug-Borne Diseases › Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis) , PARASITOLOGY › Molecular Parasitology
  • 11341

Presence of extensive Wolbachia symbiont insertions discovered in the genome of its host Glossina morsitans morsitans.

PLoS Negl. Trop. Dis., 8, doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002728, 2014.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Brelsfoard, Tsiamis, Falchetto....The authors suggested that infection by Wolbachia may give a reproductive advantage to the fly that carries the parasite causing Sleeping Sickness and nagana. Digital edition avalable from PubMedCentral PMCID: PMC3998919.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)

 



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Rickettsiales › Wolbachia, BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genomics › Pathogenomics, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Tsetse Fly-Borne Diseases › Sleeping Sickness (African Trypanosomiasis), PARASITOLOGY › Molecular Parasitology, ZOOLOGY › Arthropoda › Entomology
  • 11342

Complete genome sequence of treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete.

Science, 281, 375-388, 1998.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Fraser, Norris, Weinstock....Smith, Venter.  Sequence of the genome of the bacterium that causes syphilis.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Spirochetes › Treponema , BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genomics › Pathogenomics, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES › Syphilis, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11343

Whole-genome random sequencing and assembly of Haemophilus influenzae Rd.

Science, 269, 496-512, 1995.

First sequence of the complete genome of a free-living non-viral organism—Haemophilus influenzae—the bacterium that causes lower respiratory tract infections and meningitis in infants and young children. This genome consisted of 1,830,137 base pairs. Order of authorship in the original publication: Fleischmann, Adams, White....Smith, Venter. 

Digital facsimile from biology.iupui.edu at this link.



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Haemophilus, BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genomics › Pathogenomics, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Influenza, NEUROLOGY › Inflammatory Conditions › Cerebrospinal Meningitis, PEDIATRICS
  • 11344

On the occurrence of flint implements in undisturbed beds of gravel, sand, and clay.

Archaeologia, 38, 280-307, 1860.

In the spring of 1859, in the company of Joseph Prestwich, Evans visited Abbeville to view Boucher de Perthes’ collection of flint artifacts and to observe a hand-axe in situ at St. Acheul in a deposit containing the bones of extinct animals. Both men came away convinced that Boucher de Perthes had found evidence of prehistoric man, and both issued papers on what they had seen, Evans’ paper emphasizing the archaeological point of view, and Prestwich’s report emphasizing the geological one. With the publication of Prestwich’s and Evans’ papers, the scientific establishment finally began to be convinced of the validity of Boucher de Perthes evidence for human prehistory. Prestwich delivered his paper to the Royal Society in May, 1859, and Evans delivered his paper to the Society of Antiquaries on June 2, of that year. Evans’ paper was the first to appear in print, however, since the publication of Prestwich’s paper was delayed until 1861. 

For offprints of his paper Evans took the unusual step of changing the title to Flint implements in the drift; being an account of their discovery on the Continent and in England. In the process he also had the pages renumbered from 1-28, and had two plates from John Frere's paper published in Archaeologia in 1800 (No. 7291) reprinted and included as  extra illustrations in the offprints only. Digital facsimile of the offprint from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: EVOLUTION › Human Origins / Human Evolution
  • 11345

Sur la grotte de la Mouthe (Dordogne).

Assoc. Français pour l'Avancement des Sciences, Compte rendue de la 24me session, 1ère part., 313-314 , 1895.

The first report on the discovery and excavation of La Grotte de la Mouthe. This cave, found in 1894 and excavated by Rivière in 1895, was the fourth paleolithic cave art site discovered, after Altamira, Chabot and Pair-non-Pair, but it was probably the most instrumental in convincing the scientific establishment of the authenticity of cave paintings. Along with the paintings Rivière discovered one of the earliest carved stone oil lamps, dating from about 17,000 years before the present, proving that early man would have had the means to produce enough light to create the cave paintings deep within the interior of caves. The La Mouthe cave paintings, discovered in a cave that had been sealed for centuries, helped to prove the validity of the Altamira paintings and of Paleolithic cave art in general. The La Mouthe cave art consists of over 200 paintings and wall engravings of bison, horses, reindeer, cats and wolves, together with two human hands and a tectiform (rooflike) drawing. 



Subjects: EVOLUTION › Human Origins / Human Evolution
  • 11346

Cancer virus: The story of Epstein-Barr virus.

Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.


Subjects: ONCOLOGY & CANCER › History of Oncology & Cancer, VIROLOGY › History of Virology, VIROLOGY › VIRUSES (by Family) › Herpesviridae › Epstein-Barr Virus, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11347

The invisible enemy: A natural history of viruses.

Oxford & New York, 2003.


Subjects: VIROLOGY, VIROLOGY › History of Virology, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11348

Deadly companions: How microbes shaped our history.

Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press, 2007.


Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › History of Bacteriology, MICROBIOLOGY › History of Microbiology, VIROLOGY › History of Virology, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11349

Benign tumors in the third ventricle of the brain: Diagnosis and treatment.

Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas, 1933.


Subjects: NEUROSURGERY › Oncological
  • 11350

Benign, encapsulated tumors in the lateral ventricles of the brain: Diagnosis and treatment.

Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins, 1934.


Subjects: NEUROSURGERY › Oncological
  • 11351

Studies in pathological anatomy. Vol. 1. Plates I. - XCIII. (All Published).

New York: William Wood & Company, 1882.

Delafield's work includes striking microscopic illustrations as well as explanatory text. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: PATHOLOGY, PATHOLOGY › Pathology Illustration
  • 11352

Intracranial arterial aneurysms.

Ithaca, NY: Comstock Publishing Company, Inc., 1944.


Subjects: NEUROSURGERY › Vascular & Endovascular
  • 11353

Surgery of the brain.

Hagerstown, MD: W. F. Prior Company, Inc., 1945.

Volume XII in Lewis' Practice of Surgery. 



Subjects: NEUROSURGERY
  • 11354

Naissance d'un fléau: Histoire de la lutte contre le cancer en France (1890-1940).

Paris: Éditions Métailié, 1992.

Translated in English by David Madell (excluding the notes) as The fight against cancer France 1890-1940. London & New York: Routledge, 2002.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, ONCOLOGY & CANCER › History of Oncology & Cancer
  • 11355

The quest for artificial intelligence.

Cambridge & New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009.

A history of artificial intelligence in general, including medical applications, from the 18th century onward by a pioneer of artificial intelligence.



Subjects: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine
  • 11356

Conundrum.

London: Faber & Faber, 1974.

Morris underwent male to female sex change surgery by Georges Burou in Casablanca during the 1960s. As a much-published writer, her book was one of the first to draw wide attention to the phenomenon. New edition, with a new introduction by the author, New York: New York Review of Books, 2002.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Autobiography, SEXUALITY / Sexology › Transsexuality
  • 11357

Routledge international encyclopedia of queer culture. Edited by David. A. Gerstner.

New York & London: Routledge, 2007.


Subjects: SEXUALITY / Sexology, SEXUALITY / Sexology › History of Sexuality / Sexology, SEXUALITY / Sexology › Homosexuality
  • 11358

Exhibition of first editions of epochal achievements in the history of science.

Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1934.

Briefly annotated listings of 114 classics under the headings of Mathematics, Astronomy, Physics, Chemistry, Geology, Botany, Zoology, and the Hearst Medical Papyrus. Strangely, several major medical and biological classics were exhibited under the Zoology heading.

Digital facsimile from historyofscience.com at this link.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographical Classics
  • 11359

Trans bodies, Trans selves: A resource for the transgender community. Edited by Laura Erickson-Schroth.

Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.


Subjects: SEXUALITY / Sexology › Transsexuality, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11360

Cases with symmetrical congenital notches in the outer part of each lid and defective development of the malar bones.

Trans. ophthal. Soc. U. K., 20, 190-192, 1900.

Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS), a genetic disorder characterized by deformities of the ears, eyes, cheekbones, and chin. Also known as mandibulofacial dysostosis.



Subjects: GENETICS / HEREDITY › HEREDITARY / CONGENITAL DISEASES OR DISORDERS › Cranialfacial Disorders
  • 11361

The first man-made man: The story of two sex changes, one love affair, and a twentieth-century medical revolution.

London: Bloomsbury, 2007.

A biography of Michael Dillon, who in the 1940s was the first successful case of female-to-male gender reassignment surgery--operations done by Sir Harold Gilles. Dillon established himself as a medical student. The book describes how Dillon later fell in love with a male-to-female transsexualRoberta Cowell, who was at the time the only other transsexual in Britain.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Biographies of Individuals, SEXUALITY / Sexology › Transsexuality, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11362

The principles and art of plastic surgery. 2 vols.

Boston & Toronto: Little, Brown, 1957.


Subjects: PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY
  • 11363

Readings in medical artificial intelligence: The first decade. Edited by William Clancey and Edward H. Shortliffe.

Lebanon, IN: Addison-Wesley, 1984.


Subjects: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine
  • 11364

A manual of operative surgery on the dead body.

London: Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts , 1859.

Smith's concept was the teaching of surgery in a manner analogous to the teaching of anatomy--i.e. from a cadaver. His book organizes and explains the operations that student surgeons could practice on a cadaver.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession, SURGERY: General
  • 11365

Identification of a major co-receptor for primary isolates of HIV-1.

Nature, 381, 661-666, 1996.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Deng, Liu, Ellmeier.... This paper was immediately followed in the same issue of Nature by:

Tatjana Dragic, Virginia Litwin, Graham P. Allaway et al. "HIV-1 entry into CD4+ cells is mediated by the chemokine receptor CC-CKR-5," Nature, 381, 667-673.

What was called CC-CKR-5 in the Dragic, Litwin, Allaway paper was later named CCR5. These two papers laid the theory and the foundation behind the purposeful and targeted search for bone marrow donors with this mutation that finally achieved success 13 years later in Gero Hütter et al GM 10775 ("Long-term control of HIV by CCR5 Delta32/Delta32 stem-cell transplantation", 2009). 

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › HIV / AIDS, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES
  • 11366

Reconstructing faces: The art and wartime surgery of Gillies, Pickerill, McIndoe and Mowlem.

Dunedin, New Zealand: University of Otago Press, 2013.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War II, PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY › History of Plastic Surgery
  • 11367

Allied medicine in the Great War: The medical front and the people who fought.

London & New York: Macmillan International & Red Globe Press, 2019.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11368

The genealogy of a gene: Patents, HIV/AIDS, and race.

Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2015.

"Myles Jackson uses the story of the CCR5 gene to investigate the interrelationships among science, technology, and society. Mapping the varied “genealogy” of CCR5—intellectual property, natural selection, Big and Small Pharma, human diversity studies, personalized medicine, ancestry studies, and race and genomics—Jackson links a myriad of diverse topics. The history of CCR5 from the 1990s to the present offers a vivid illustration of how intellectual property law has changed the conduct and content of scientific knowledge, and the social, political, and ethical implications of such a transformation.

"The CCR5 gene began as a small sequence of DNA, became a patented product of a corporation, and then, when it was found to be an AIDS virus co-receptor with a key role in the immune system, it became part of the biomedical research world—and a potential moneymaker for the pharmaceutical industry. When it was further discovered that a mutation of the gene found in certain populations conferred near-immunity to the AIDS virus, questions about race and genetics arose. Jackson describes these developments in the context of larger issues, including the rise of “biocapitalism,” the patentability of products of nature, the difference between U.S. and European patenting approaches, and the relevance of race and ethnicity to medical research" (publisher).



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › History of Molecular Biology, Biotechnology › History of Biotechnology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › HIV / AIDS › History of HIV / AIDS, LAW and Medicine & the Life Sciences, LAW and Medicine & the Life Sciences › Medical Patents
  • 11369

The surgical construction of male genitalia for the female-to-male transsexual.

Plast. reconstr. Surg., 53, 511-516, 1974.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Noe, Birdsell, Laub.



Subjects: PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY, SEXUALITY / Sexology › Transsexuality
  • 11370

Transsexual and other disorders of gender identity: A practical guide to management. Edited by James Barrett.

Oxford: Radcliffe Publishing Ltd, 2007.


Subjects: SEXUALITY / Sexology › Transsexuality
  • 11371

Proceedings of the second Interdisciplinary Symposium on Gender Dysphoria Syndrome. Edited by Donald R. Laub and Patrick Gandy.

Stanford, CA: Division of Reconstructive and Rehabilitation Surgery, 1974.

A symposium held at the Stanford University School of Medicine, February 2-4, 1973. It is probable that this is the first separate publication on the medical and surgical aspects of transsexuality --male to female and female to male-- published by a medical school department. "The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for the exchange of scientific information about the patient who desires and is considered for gender re-identification.

"The symposium was sponsored by the Divisions of Urology and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Stanford School of Medicine. Its principal architect and chairman was Donald R. Laub, M.D., Chief of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. [My understanding in writing this entry in 12-2019 was that the proceedings of the first symposium may not have been published.]

"Participants and contributors included 105 representatives of the major teams and private practitioners concerned with the diagnosis, evalutaion, and social adjustment of the gender dysphoric patient. The group included psychiatrists, surgeons, obstetricians and gynecologists, attorneys, psychologists, sociologists, and experts in epidemiologic and health services research. In addition to the United States, numerous representatives from Canada, Mexico, England, Morocco and Australia were present."

Among the pioneering discussions published in this symposium report was the first ever presentation by Georges Burou on the modern form of penile inversion MtF sex reassignment surgery that he originated during the1950s. Because Burou never published his techique except in this 1973 presentation, most of what is known about it historically comes from second accounts of surgeons who observed him operating, or from surgeons who examinated Burou's patients and reverse-engineered the operation. The Wikipedia article on Burou, to which I have linked, is particularly informative about his work.

 "Following below is a paper presented by Dr. Georges Burou at the Second Interdisciplinary Symposium on Gender Dysphoria Syndrome. The symposium was held at the Stanford University School of Medicine in February 1973. This was the first time that Dr. Burou had publicly presented the details of his pioneering technique for MtF sex reassignment surgery. He had invented this technique 17 years earlier in 1956, and had continued to refine and improve it since then. By the time of this symposium, Dr. Burou had performed over 3000 such MtF SRS procedures at his "Clinique du Parc", located at 13 Rue La Pebie in Casablanca, Morocco. By then Dr. Burou's surgical technique had been "reverse engineered" and adopted by many other surgeons throughout the world who had seen the many results of his work. Dr. Burou's remarks were translated and appeared on pages 188-194 of the symposium proceedings. That translation and the surgical drawings Dr. Burou used in his presentation are reprinted below." (https://ai.eecs.umich.edu/people/conway/TS/SRS.html#anchor41859).

 

 



Subjects: PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY, SEXUALITY / Sexology › Transsexuality
  • 11372

Dominant erbliche Akrocephalosyndaktylie.

Zeitschrift für Kinderheilkunde, 90, 301-320, 1964.

Pfeiffer syndrome, a rare genetic disorder characterized by the premature fusion of certain bones of the skull (craniosynostosis) which affects the shape of the head and face. In addition, the syndrome includes abnormalities of the hands (such as wide and deviated thumbs) and feet (such as wide and deviated big toes).



Subjects: GENETICS / HEREDITY › HEREDITARY / CONGENITAL DISEASES OR DISORDERS › Cranialfacial Disorders
  • 11373

The transsexual phenomenon.

New York: The Julian Press, 1966.

"A scientific report on transsexualism and sex conversion in the human male and female." 



Subjects: SEXUALITY / Sexology › Transsexuality
  • 11374

A randomized, controlled trial of Ebola virus disease therapeutics.

New Engl. J. Med., 381, 2293-2303, 2019.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Mulangu, Dodd, Davey.... One synthetic drug (Remdesivir, an antiviral) and 3 biologicals were used in this trial. The 3 biologicals were: REGN-EB3, a triple monoclonal antibody biologic, and Mab114, a single monoclonal antibody biologic, and ZMapp, another triple monoclonal antibody biologic. REGN-EB3, and Mab114 outperformed the other two, reducing mortality from up to 90% in the untreated to 33.5% for the REGN group and 35.1% for the Mab114 group. This was the first randomized, controlled trial of biopharmaceuticals that had significant success in curing Ebola. Digital text from nejm.org at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Ebola Virus Disease, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Antiviral Drugs, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Biological Medical Product (Biologic), WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11375

Protective monotherapy against lethal Ebola virus infection by a potently neutralizing antibody.

Science, 351, 1339-1342, 2016.

The cited paper was immediately followed in the same issue of Science by: John Misasi, Morgan A. Gilman, Masaru Kanekiyo et al, "Structural and molecular basis for Ebola virus neutralization by protective human antibodies," Science, 351, 1343-1346. This paper illustrates crystal structures at 2Å resolution of the Ebola viral epitopes that are being recognized and targeted by monoclonal antibodies from a particular human survivor of the 1995 Kikwit (Congo) Ebola outbreak, who happened to mount an unusual and very robust and potent immune response.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Congo, Democratic Republic of the, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Ebola Virus Disease, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Biological Medical Product (Biologic)
  • 11376

Hemorrhagic colitis associated with a rare Escherichia coli serotype.

New Eng. J. Med., 308, 681-85, 1983.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Riley, Remis, Helgerson. First description in print of a particularly virulent E.coli (0157-H7) infection, for which no antibiotics were effective; the only treatment being aggressive hydration.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases
  • 11377

The association between idiopathic hemolytic uremic syndrome and infection by Verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli.

J. infect. Dis., 151, 775-182, 1985.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Karmali, Petric, Lim. The authors discovered that a hemolytic uremic syndrome, associated with E. coli 0157-H7 (first described in No. 11376), and which could not be cured by antibiotics, was caused by an unusually potent toxin in the intestine produced by the E. coli 0157-H7. This toxin they identified as Verotoxin. Discovery that a toxin caused hemolytic uremic syndrome explained why this particular bacterial illness could not be treated by antibiotics.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Negative Bacteria › Escherichia coli, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Food-Borne Diseases, TOXICOLOGY, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 11378

Botulinum toxin: a treatment for facial asymmetry caused by facial nerve paralysis.

Plast. reconstr. Surg., 84, 353-55, 1989.

First documentation of a cosmetic use for botulinum toxin (Botox). This was one of the early documented applications of a biological medical product.



Subjects: PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Biological Medical Product (Biologic), PLASTIC & RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY, TOXICOLOGY
  • 11379

Molecular epidemiology of infectious disease.

Washington, DC: American Society for Microbiology, 2004.


Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › Molecular Epidemiology
  • 11380

L'action bactericide des eaux de la Jumna et du Gange sur le vibrion du cholera.

Ann. Inst. Pasteur, 10, 511-523, 1896.

Hankin described the antibacterial activity of a then-unknown source in the Ganges and Jumna Rivers in India. He noted that "It is seen that the unboiled water of the Ganges kills the cholera germ in less than 3 hours. The same water, when boiled, does not have the same effect. On the other hand, well water is a good medium for this microbe, whether boiled or filtered." He suggested that this unknown source was responsible for limiting the spread of cholera. Some observers have considered this account an early observation of bacteriophage activity. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Cholera, VIROLOGY › Bacteriophage
  • 11381

The garden of health conteyning the sundry rare and hidden vertues and properties of all kindes of simples and plants, together with the maner how they are to be vsed and applyed in medicine for the health of mans body, against diuers diseases and infirmities most common amongst men. Gathered by the long experience and industrie of William Langham, practitioner in phisicke.

London: [Deputies of C. Barker], 1597.

An alphabetically arranged handbook of herbal remedies. The title page was misprinted 1579, but the work was actually printed in 1597. A list of the plants discussed is available from Early English Books Online at this link. Second edition, London, 1633.



Subjects: BOTANY › Medical Botany, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 11382

Rhetoric, medicine, and the woman writer, 1600–1700.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2018.

"How did physicians come to dominate the medical profession? Lyn Bennett challenges the seemingly self-evident belief that scientific competence accounts for physicians' dominance. Instead, she argues that the whole enterprise of learned medicine was, in large measure, facilitated by an intensely classical education that included extensive training in rhetoric, and that this rhetorical training is ultimately responsible for the achievement of professional dominance. Bennett examines previously unexplored connections among writers and genres as well as competing livelihoods and classes. Engaging the histories of rhetoric, medicine, literature, and culture throughout, she goes on to focus specifically on the work of women who professed as well as practiced medicine. Pointing to some of the ways women's writing shapes realities of body, mind, and spirit as it negotiates social, cultural, and professional ideologies of gender, this book offers an important corrective to some long-held beliefs about women's role in early modern discourse" (publisher).



Subjects: Education, Biomedical, & Biomedical Profession › History of Biomedical Education & Medical Profession, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11383

The herbal in antiquity and its transmission to later ages.

J. Hellenic Studies, 47, 1-52, 1927.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › History of Ancient Medicine & Biology, ANCIENT MEDICINE › Late Antiquity, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines › History of Materia Medica
  • 11384

La Commission Sanitaire des États-Unis, son origine, son organisation et ses résultats avec une notice sur les hôpitaux militaires aux États-Unis et sur la réforme sanitaire dans les armées Europénnes.

Paris: E. Dentu, 1865.

Digital facsimile from BnFGallica at this link.



Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE, HOSPITALS
  • 11385

Notices sur la chirurgie des enfants.

Paris: P. Asselin, 18641867.

The first general treatise on pediatric surgery. From parts publication. Translated into English by Richard J. Dunglison as Surgical diseases of infants and children, Philadelphia: Henry C. Lea, 1873. Digital facsimile of the English translation from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Pediatric Surgery
  • 11386

Children's surgery: A worldwide history.

Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2012.


Subjects: Pediatric Surgery › History of Pediatric Surgery
  • 11387

Theatrum medico-juridicum, continens varias easque maxime notabiles tam ad tribunalia ecclesiastico-civilia, quam ad medicinam forensem, pertinentes materias. Ex diversis optimorum authorum ... voluminibus excerptum .... Opus jctis, physicis, practicis, studiosis, chirurgis, aliisque utile et necessarium.

Nuremberg: Apud Joh. F. Rudigerum, 1725.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Forensic Medicine (Legal Medicine), LAW and Medicine & the Life Sciences
  • 11388

Letter of Johns Hopkins to the trustees of "The Johns Hopkins Hospital".

Baltimore, MD: [Privately Printed], 1873.

The letter published in this 12-page pamphlet was dated March 10th, 1873. It outlined financier and philanthropist Johns Hopkins' planned bequest and general plans for the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Hopkins died in December 1873. The Johns Hopkins Hospital was opened in 1889. This and the Johns Hopkins school of medicine are considered the founding institutions of modern American medicine, and the birthplace of numerous medical traditions including rounds, residents and house staff.

Digital facsimile from the U.S. National Library of Medicine at this link.



Subjects: American (U.S.) Contributions to Medicine & the Life Sciences, HOSPITALS, U.S.: CONTENT OF PUBLICATIONS BY STATE & TERRITORY › Maryland
  • 11389

Trepanation, trephining and craniotomy: History and stories.

Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2019.


Subjects: NEUROSURGERY › History of Neurosurgery
  • 11390

Chirurgie opératoire du système nerveux. 2 vols.

Paris: Rueff & Cie, 18941895.

Among the innovations that Chipault made in neurosurgery were the removal of the underyling dura in meningiomas, a new laminectomy technique, development of small clamps for closing a scalp incision, the treatment of hydrocephalus by tapping the venticles through a burr hole. He proposed a scheme of craniectomies for treatment of craniosynostosis, and pioneered the use of wires and steel splints in the stabilization of the spine in trauma and deformities.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.

 



Subjects: NEUROSURGERY
  • 11391

Plague ports: The global urban impact of bubonic plague, 1894-1901.

New York: New York University Press, 2007.

"A century ago, the third bubonic plague swept the globe, taking more than 15 million lives. The book tells the story of ten cities on five continents that were ravaged by the epidemic in it's initial years: Hong Kong and Bombay, the Asian emporiums of the British Empire where the epidemic first surfaced; Sydney, Honolulu and San Francisco, three 'pearls' of the Pacific; Buenos Aires and Rio de Janiero in South America; Alexandria and Cape town in Africa; and Porto in Europe. This book examines the plague's impact in each of these cities, on politicians, the medical and public health authorities, and especially on the citizenry, many of whom were recent migrants crammed into grim living spaces" (publisher).



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 11392

Research and writings on training, conditioning, treatment of athletic injuries, and corrective work. 2 vols.

Pullman, WA: State College of Washington, 1947.

Bohm was probably the first full-time professional physician in professional sports. 



Subjects: PHYSICAL MEDICINE / REHABILITATION › Exercise / Training / Fitness, Sports Medicine
  • 11393

The last plague in the Baltic Region 1709-1713.

Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press, 2010.

This work "offers a thorough description and analysis of the terrible plague epidemic that ravaged the Baltic region in the years between 1709 and 1713? at the same time when the region was razed by the Great Northern War (1700-?21). Sweden under Carolus XII had lost its supremacy, and Russia under Peter the Great emerged as the new major power in the region. With the marching armies came the plague and its effects, which were particularly devastating, since it hit a population already weakened by famines and desolation caused by the war. Drawing on substantial documentation in city and state archives, the study addresses a range of important discussions touching on the far-reaching consequences of the plague across the region: including mortality rates, symptoms of the disease, treatments, how the disease spread, why some parishes, villages, houses and families were particularly hard hit, the measures taken by the authorities to confine the epidemic and the reactions of people to these measures" (publisher).



Subjects: EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans) › Plague, History of
  • 11394

Über die Beulenpest in Bombay im Jahre 1897. Gesamtbericht von der Kaiserlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Wien zur Studium der Beulenpest nach Indien entsendeten Commission. 2 vols. in 3.

Vienna: Carl Gerold's Sohn, 18981900.

Müller died at the age of 32 as a result of exposure to this plague.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › India, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Flea-Borne Diseases › Plague (transmitted by fleas from rats to humans)
  • 11396

Molecular identification of bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis.

New Eng. J. Med., 353, 1899-1911, 2005.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Fredricks, Fiedler, Marrazzo. Using molecular methods, the authors confirmed that absence or greatly reduced number of Lactobacilli was associated with vaginosis. They also identified the primary infecting bacteria as Prevotella, Sneathia, Megashera, and Atropobium.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BACTERIOLOGY › BACTERIA (mostly pathogenic; sometimes indexed only to genus) › Gram-Positive Bacteria › Lactobacillus , MICROBIOLOGY › Microbiome, OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY › GYNECOLOGY
  • 11397

Actionable diagnosis of neuroleptospirosis by next-generation sequencing.

New Eng. J. Med., 370, 2408-2416, 2014.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Wilson, Naccache, Samayoa...Chiu. This research demonstrated the value of "next-generation-sequencing" in the diagnosis of a specific meningoencephalitis, a disease which can be caused by more than 100 different infectious agents.

"Summary: A 14-year-old boy with severe combined immunodeficiency presented three times to a medical facility over a period of 4 months with fever and headache that progressed to hydrocephalus and status epilepticus necessitating a medically induced coma. Diagnostic workup including brain biopsy was unrevealing. Unbiased next-generation sequencing of the cerebrospinal fluid identified 475 of 3,063,784 sequence reads (0.016%) corresponding to leptospira infection. Clinical assays for leptospirosis were negative. Targeted antimicrobial agents were administered, and the patient was discharged home 32 days later with a status close to his premorbid condition. Polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) and serologic testing at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) subsequently confirmed evidence of Leptospira santarosai infection."

Digital facsimile from nejm.org at this link.

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genomics › Pathogenomics, Biomedical Informatics, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Neuroinfectious Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Neuroinfectious Diseases › Encephalitis
  • 11398

Pathogen genomics in public health.

New Eng. J. Med., 381, 2569-2580, 2019.

"An important transformation is under way in public health. Next-generation sequencing (also called “high-throughput sequencing”) is reshaping communicable disease surveillance, allowing for earlier detection and more precise investigation of outbreaks. Next-generation sequencing helps characterize microbes more effectively and offers new insights into their ecology and transmission. The plethora of sequence data provides raw material for the research and development of new diagnostics and therapeutics. This article describes how pathogen genomics has been changing public health in the United States and globally." (editor).

(Thanks to Juan Weiss for this reference and its interpretation.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › MOLECULAR BIOLOGY › Genomics › Pathogenomics, Biomedical Informatics, PUBLIC HEALTH, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 11399

The coming of age of artificial intelligence in medicine.

Artif. Intell. Med., 46, 5-17, 2009.

Order of authorship in the original publication: Patel, Shortliffe, Stefanelli, Szolovits, Berthold, Bellazzi, Abu-Hanna. "Abstract: This paper is based on a panel discussion held at the Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Europe (AIME) conference in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, in July 2007. It had been more than 15 years since Edward Shortliffe gave a talk at AIME in which he characterized artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine as being in its "adolescence" (Shortliffe EH. The adolescence of AI in medicine: will the field come of age in the '90s? Artificial Intelligence in Medicine 1993;5:93-106). In this article, the discussants reflect on medical AI research during the subsequent years and characterize the maturity and influence that has been achieved to date. Participants focus on their personal areas of expertise, ranging from clinical decision-making, reasoning under uncertainty, and knowledge representation to systems integration, translational bioinformatics, and cognitive issues in both the modeling of expertise and the creation of acceptable systems."



Subjects: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine