An Interactive Annotated World Bibliography of Printed and Digital Works in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences from Circa 2000 BCE to Circa 2020 by Fielding H. Garrison (1870-1935), Leslie T. Morton (1907-2004), and Jeremy M. Norman (1945- ) Traditionally Known as “Garrison-Morton”

15423 entries, 13280 authors and 1897 subjects. Updated: October 17, 2021

Browse by Entry Number 8900–8999

100 entries
  • 8900

Pioneers of birth control in England and America.

New York: Voluntary Parenthood League, 1919.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Contraception › History of Contraception
  • 8901

Victory over pain: A history of anesthesia.

New York: Henry Schuman, 1946.


Subjects: ANESTHESIA › History of Anesthesia
  • 8902

The American disease: Origins of narcotic control.

New York: Oxford University Press, 1973.

Third expanded edition (1999). "Supporting the theory that Americans' attitudes toward drugs have followed a cyclic pattern of tolerance and restraint, author David F. Musto examines the relations between public outcry and the creation of prohibitive drug laws from the end of the Civil War up to the present. Originally published in 1973, and then in an expanded edition in 1987, this third edition contains a new chapter and preface that both address the renewed debate on policy and drug legislation from the end of the Reagan administration to the current Clinton administration. Here, Musto thoroughly investigates how our nation has dealt with such issues as the controversies over prevention programs and mandatory minimum sentencing, the catastrophe of the crack epidemic, the fear of a heroin revival, and the continued debate over the legalization of marijuana" (publisher).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health, TOXICOLOGY › Drug Addiction › History of Drug Addiction
  • 8903

Drugs in America: A historical reader. [Compiled by] David F. Musto.

New York: New York University Press, 2002.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States , PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals, PUBLIC HEALTH › History of Public Health, TOXICOLOGY › Drug Addiction › History of Drug Addiction
  • 8904

Confessions of an opium eater.

London: Printed for Taylor and Hessey, 1822.

First published anonymously in September and October 1821 in the London Magazine, 4, No. xxi, 293-312, and No. xxii, 353-79, the Confessions was released in book form in 1822, and, after various reprints, again in 1856, in an edition revised by De Quincey. Numerous book-form editions of this work are available in digital facsimile online.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Autobiography, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology › Fiction, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Botanic Sources of Single Component Drugs › Opium, TOXICOLOGY › Drug Addiction
  • 8905

Leprosy and empire: A medical and cultural history.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

"An interdisciplinary study of why a disease that is so difficult to catch has caused such alarm. It examines how the fear of leprosy was part of nineteenth-century imperial expansion, as colonial officials and missionaries were thought exposed to the risk of infection, which might be carried back to Britain" (publisher)



Subjects: INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Leprosy › History of Leprosy
  • 8906

Printing and the brain of man.

New York: The Grolier Club, 2011.

Annotated catalogue of an exhibition of rare books in the history of neuroanatomy and neurosurgery from Eugene Flamm's library, including many great classics.



Subjects: ANATOMY › Neuroanatomy › History of Neuroanatomy, BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Physicians' / Scientists' Libraries, NEUROSURGERY › History of Neurosurgery
  • 8907

The dawn of neurosurgery. Rare books from the collection of Eugene S. Flamm.

Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Sheridan Libraries, 2003.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Physicians' / Scientists' Libraries, NEUROSURGERY › History of Neurosurgery
  • 8908

From skulls to brains: 2500 years of neurosurgical progress.

Rolling Meadows, IL: American Association of Neurological Surgeons, 2008.

An annotated exhibition catalogue of rare books on the history of neurological surgery from Eugene Flamm's library.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Physicians' / Scientists' Libraries, NEUROSURGERY › History of Neurosurgery
  • 8909

Catalogue of an exhibition of early and later medical Americana.

New York: New York Academy of Medicine, 1926.


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › United States
  • 8910

On the movements and habits of climbing plants.

J. Linn. Soc., 9 (33 &34) 1-118., 1865.

Darwin's report on his discoveries concerning the adaptive value of climbing for certain plants, including the development of circumnutation. Darwin waited ten years to publish the first edition in book form (1875) with the same title. That edition included data published by Fritz Muller and Hugo de Vrie's as well as darwin's own folllow-up research. The illustrations in the book form edition were drawn by the author's son George Darwin.



Subjects: BOTANY, EVOLUTION
  • 8911

The effects of cross and self fertilisation in the vegetable kingdom.

London: John Murray, 1876.

Darwin's report on over 12 years of experimentation with cross and self-fertilization on 57 species. In these experiments Darwin discovered and demonstrated the concept of hybrid vigor or heterosis.



Subjects: BOTANY, GENETICS / HEREDITY
  • 8912

Darwin on man: A psychological study of scientific creativity by Howard E. Gruber. Together with Darwin's early and unpublished notebooks transcribed and annotated by Paul H. Barrett. Foreward by Jean Piaget.

New York: E. P. Dutton, 1974.

In addition to a frequently original study of the development of Darwin's psychological theories, the authors publish for the first time two extremely significant manuscript notebooks by Darwin written in 1837. These notebooks, which the authors supplement with notes and commentary, provide the earliest available insight into the origins of Darwin's views on human and comparative psychology. Some of the ideas they record were later developed in The descent of man and The expression of emotions in man and animals. Also the notebooks prove something that Darwin never publically admitted: the belief that man and the great apes descended from a common ancestor was the core of his theory of human evolution as early as 1837. Furthermore, the notebooks show that Darwin recognized the relationship between animal and human sexual behavior during the height of Victorian prudery. No wonder he never developed in print such theories as "Our descent, then is the origin of our evil passions!!− The Devil under form of Baboon is our grandfather!" (M. Notebook, p. 123).



Subjects: EVOLUTION, EVOLUTION › History of Evolutionary Thought, PSYCHOLOGY
  • 8913

The formation of vegetable mould through the action of worms, with observations on their habits.

London: John Murray, 1881.

Darwin's last book, published only 6 months before his death, but reporting on a subject that he had studied for more than 50 years. "He showed the services performed by earthworms in eating leaves and grinding earth in their gizzards and turning it into fertile soil, which they constantly sift and turn over down to a depth of twenty inches form the surface, thereby aerating it. He calculating from the weight of worm-casting that on one acre in one year's time eighteen tons of soil are brought up to the surface by worms. This was a pioneer study of quantaitative ecology" (Gavin de Beer in D.S.B.)



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Ecology / Environment
  • 8914

On the various contrivances by which British and foreign orchids are fertilised by insects, and on the good effects of intercrossing.

London: John Murray, 1861.

Darwin's first work on plant fertilization and the first volume of evidence that he published to support the theories advanced in On the origin of species (1859). This was also the only book by Darwin that was issued by Murray in distinctive purple cloth (first edition only).



Subjects: BOTANY, EVOLUTION
  • 8915

On the origin of species by means of natural selection....Third edition with additions and corrections (Seventh thousand).

London: John Murray, 1861.

Extensively revised, and the first edition to include the "historical sketch" crediting the historical precursors to the theory of evolution by natural selection. Darwin added this chapter in response to writings by Samuel Butler and others.



Subjects: BIOLOGY, EVOLUTION
  • 8916

The structure and distribution of coral reefs. Being the first part of the geology of the voyage of the Beagle, under the command of Capt. Fitzroy, R. N. During the years 1832 to 1836.

London: Smith, Elder, 1842.

With slight modification, Darwin's work remains the accepted explanation for these phenomena. "Even if he had done nothing else, the theory of the coral islands alone would have placed Darwin in the very front of investigations of nature" (Geikie).



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Ecology / Environment, BIOLOGY › Marine Biology, EVOLUTION, VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists, ZOOLOGY › Anthozoology
  • 8917

Observations on the volcanic islands, visited during the voyage of the H.M.S. Beagle, together with some brief notices on the geology of Australia and the Cape of Good Hope. Being the second part of the geology of the voyage of the Beagle.

London: Smith, Elder, 1844.


Subjects: BIOLOGY › Ecology / Environment, EVOLUTION
  • 8918

Geological observations on South America. Being the third part of the geology of the voyage of the Beagle.

London: Smith, Elder, 1846.

The third and last of Darwin's geological reports on the Beagle voyage. In it he described the pampas, the plateaus and the Andres, showing how they had been gradually pushed up in the way that Charles Lyell surmised without the introduction of catastrophic events. The descriptions of secondary fossil shells from South America, illustrated in Sowerby's plates, are by Edward Forbes.



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Ecology / Environment, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Latin America, EVOLUTION
  • 8919

Erasmus Darwin. By Ernst Krause. Translated from the German by W. S. Dallas. With a preliminary notice by Charles Darwin.

London: John Murray, 1879.

Krause's short biography originally appeared in the German evolutionary periodical Kosmos in February 1879. In this translation Darwin added a biographical contribution that is longer than Krause's, i.e. 127pp by Darwin versus 89pp. by Krause. Darwin paid frequent tribute to his grandfather Erasmus, but denied that Erasmus's ideas had influenced him significantly in the development of the theory of evolution by natural selection. Digital facsimile of the copy Darwin presented to his daughter Henrietta Litchfield from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Biographies of Individuals, EVOLUTION
  • 8920

For private distribution. The following pages contain extracts from letters addressed to Professor Henslow by C. Darwin, Esq.

Cambridge, England: [Privately Printed], 1835.

Darwin's teacher, John Stevens Henslow, had some of Darwin's letters to him published for private distribution as a pamphlet while Darwin was on the Beagle circumnavigation. Estimates of the number of copies printed vary from about 25 to about 200.



Subjects: BIOLOGY, EVOLUTION
  • 8921

The botanic garden: A poem in two parts. Part I. Containing the economy of vegetation. Part II. The loves of the plants. With philosophical notes. 2 vols.

17891791.

The first edition of part 2, preceded part 1, being published in 1789. This poem was the chief source of Erasmus Darwin's literary fame during his lifetime. Like his other works, this poem contains a great deal of frequently advanced scientific information in the nearly 300 footnotes and 115 pages of appendices. This work also contains five plates engraved by William Blake, including "The fertilisation of Egypt" after a design by Henry Fuseli, and 4 engravings of the Portland Vase.



Subjects: BOTANY, EVOLUTION, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 8922

The temple of nature; or the origin of society. A poem, with philosophical notes.

London: Printed by T. Bensley for J. Johnson, 1803.

Erasmus Darwin's last poem, which mainly expounds his theories of evolution. He traces the progress of life form its origin as microscopic specks in premeval seas to its culmination in a civilized human society. The first canto shows life's origin and its evolution from aquatic to land forms. The second deals with reproduction--asexual, hermaphroditic and finally sexual reproduction with all its advantages. The third canto traces the progress of the mind, from its origin as a mere meeting-place of nerves to its present complexity in man. In the fourth canto Darwin descrbies the struggle for existence and the survival of the fittest. The essay-length scientific notes (last 124pp.) contain summaries of theories of spontaneous generation, etc. Erasmus Darwin's theory of evolution has been compared to Lamarckism.



Subjects: BIOLOGY, EVOLUTION, LITERATURE / Philosophy & Medicine & Biology
  • 8923

A system of vegetables, according to their classes, orders, genera, species with their characters and differences.... Translated from the thirteenth edition (As published by Dr. Murray) of the Systema vegetabilium of the late professor Linneus; and from the Supplementum plantarum of the present professor Linneus. By a Botanical Society, at Lichfield. 2 vols. [Edited by Erasmus Darwin.]

Lichfield, England: Printed by John Jackson & London: Leigh and Sotheby, 1783.

English translation of Linneus's Species plantarum (No. 99.1), edited by Charles Darwin's grandfather. Digital facsimile from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, Internet Archive, at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Classification / Systemization of Plants
  • 8924

Dictionaire des sciences médicales. Biographie médicale. 7 vols.

Paris: C. L. F. Panckoucke, 18201825.

Authorship of this anonymous work is frequently attributed to Jourdan, who signed the preface. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works)
  • 8925

Procede pour écrire les paroles, la musique et le plain-chant au moyen de points, a l’usage des aveugles et dispose pour eux.

Paris: [Institution Royale des Jeunes Aveugles], 1829.

This large quarto volume of 4 preliminary leaves and 32 pages included the first presentation of the Braille system of printing and reading for the blind, which represents letters and numbers by combinations of six dots. Though Braille introduced his six dot system briefly in this 1829 work, most of the Procede pour écrire was published through the traditional system of printing for the blind using raised letters that was invented by the founder of l'Institut Royale des Jeunes Aveugles, Valentin Haüy. Digital facsimile from the National Foundation for the Blind at this link.

 



Subjects: OPHTHALMOLOGY › Blind Education
  • 8926

Histoire naturelle des Indes. The Drake manuscript in The Pierpont Morgan Library.... Foreward by Patrick O'Brian. Introduction by Verlyn Klinkenborg. Translations by Ruth Kraemer.

New York & London: W. W. Norton and Company, 1996.

"In 1983, The Morgan Library & Museum received, as the bequest of Clara S. Peck, an extraordinary volume whose beautiful paintings and descriptions document the plant, animal, and human life of the Caribbean late in the sixteenth century. Spaniards had already begun to exert influence over the indigenous people of the area when explorers from England and France arrived, among them Sir Francis Drake. The volume, known as the Drake Manuscript and titled Histoire Naturelle des Indes when it was bound in the eighteenth century, gives us a wonderful picture of daily life at the time of Drake's many visits to the region. Although Drake's connection to the manuscript is uncertain, he is mentioned on more than one occasion by the authors. Drake himself is known to have painted, but none of his work survives." Digital facsimile of the original manuscript from The Morgan Library & Museum at this link.

 



Subjects: BOTANY, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Caribbean, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Latin America, NATURAL HISTORY
  • 8927

A. Cornelius Celsus. Of Medicine. In eight books. Translated with notes critical and explanatory by James Grieve.

London: Printed for D.Wilson and T. Durham, 1756.

First English translation of Celsus De medicina. That it was translated into English for the first time in the mid-eighteenth century is a reflection of the use of Latin as the international language of medicine and science well through the end of the 18th century. Digital facsimile from The Medical Heritage Library, Internet Archive, at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire
  • 8928

História da fIsiologia em Portugal.

Lisbon, 1954.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Portugal, PHYSIOLOGY › History of Physiology
  • 8929

Dispelling the darkness: Voyage in the Malay Archipelago and the discovery of evolution by Wallace and Darwin.

Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Co., 2013.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Singapore, EVOLUTION › History of Evolutionary Thought
  • 8930

Trattado unico da constituiçam pestilencial de Pernambuco, offerecido a ElRey N.S. por ser servido ordenar por seu Governador aos Medicos da America, que assistem aonde ha este contagio, que o compusessem para se conferirem pelos Coripheos da Medicina aos dictames com que he trattada esta pestilencial febre.

Lisbon: Na Officina de Miguel Manescal, Impressor do Principe Nosso Senhor, 1694.

The first scientific description of yellow fever in Brazil by the first European physician to treat the disease in Brazil, and perhaps in all of Latin America. It includes the description of the first autopsy of a yellow fever victim in Brazil. The author received his medical training at Coimbra and practiced for many years in Recife. There was speculation that he may have been a native of that Brazilian city, where he had the opportunity to see the first epidemics of the malady, then referred to as "o mal da bicha". If Ferreira da Rosa was born in Brazil, this would be the first scientific book by a Brazilian author. (My thanks to Richard Ramer for this entry).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Portugal, EPIDEMIOLOGY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 8931

Dialogus de re medica compendiaria ratione, præter quædam alia, universam Anatomen humani corporis perstringens, summè necessarius omnibus Medicinæ canditatis.

Valencia: Per Ioannem Mey Flandrum [Juan Mey], 1549.

The first Spanish medical book based on the writings of Vesalius, written by Vesalius’s student Pedro Jimeno, whose activities “constituted the cornerstone of the Valencian School of Anatomy and the Spanish Vesalian movement” (López Piñero). Dialogus de re medica was the first text on anatomy after Vesalius’s own De humani corporis fabrica (1543) to incorporate the new morphology completely. It is a succinct summary of Vesalius’s work (occasional sentences are quoted literally), but it also expounds the results of Jimeno’s own research: for example, it includes the first printed description of the stapes, in the middle ear. (My thanks to Richard Ramer for this entry.) Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANATOMY › 16th Century, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Spain, OTOLOGY
  • 8932

História geral da medicina brasileira. Vol. 1 (All published).

São Paulo, Brazil: Editora da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 1977.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine
  • 8933

Morão, Rosa & Pimenta; notícia dos três primeiros livros em vernáculo sôbre a medicina no Brasil. Estudo crítico de Gilberto Osório de Andrade. Introduções históricas, interpretações e notas de Eustáquio Duarte. Pref. de Gilberto Freyre.

Recife, Brazil: Arquivo Público Estadual, Pernambuco, 1956.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine
  • 8934

Trattado unico das bexigas, e sarampo, offerecido a D. João de Sousa, composto por Romaõ Mõsia Reinhipo.

Lisbon: Joaõ Galraõ, 1683.

One of the first works on medicine practiced in Brazil, published by Mourão under the pseudonym Romaõ Mõsia Reinhipo. Mourão distinguished clearly between smallpox and measles. There was still much confusion in the seventeenth century about the clear individualization of these diseases. Digital facsimile from Biblioteca Nacional de Portugal at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Measles, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › Smallpox , Latin American Medicine, UROLOGY
  • 8935

Boticas & pharmacias: Uma historia ilustrada da farmacia no Brasil.

São Paulo, Brazil: Casa de Palavra, 2006.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACY › History of Pharmacy
  • 8936

História da febre-amarela no Brasil.

Rio de Janeiro: Departamento Nacional de Endemias Rurais, 1969.

Digital facsimile from bvsms.saude.gov.br at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, EPIDEMIOLOGY › History of Epidemiology, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever › History of Yellow Fever, Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine
  • 8937

Natureza em boiões: Medicinas e boticá-rios no Brasil setecentista.

Campinas, Brazil: Editora da Unicamp, 1999.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, Latin American Medicine › History of Latin American Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines › History of Materia Medica, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 8938

Noticias do que he o achaque do bicho, diffiniçam do seu crestame[n]to, subimento corrupçaõ, sinaes, & cura atè, o quinto grao, ou intensaõ delle, suas differenças, & co[m]plicaços, com que se ajunta.

Lisbon: Miguel Manescal, 1707.

This book has been "considered by some authors to be the first reference to the chagasic megaesophagus and megacolon that appeared in history. In descriptions considered to refer megaesophagus, although dysphagia, the major symptom of this disease, is not recognized, typical manifestations of a irritating, inflammatory or ulcerative condition are identified, not affecting the esophagus but the stomach. In the description considered to refer to megacolon, the signs and symptoms suggest the diagnostic possibility of hemorrhoids and of the "achaque do bicho" itself, and do not recall the clinical picture of the chagasic megacolon in an absolute manner. On this basis, there is no reason to maintain the book "Noticias do que he o achaque do bicho" within the history of the digestive form of Chagas' disease" (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9201322).

"The author started his life as a shopboy and became a prosperous merchant. It seems that he earned considerable sums by buying very cheap slaves who were sick with the "bicho", curing them and selling them at a good profit. He was not a physician,  and in the preface he states that he published his book only out of charity. This book is one of the three most important and rarest works on medicine written in Brazil." (Moraes). Digital facsimile from the John Carter Brown Library, Internet Archive, at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, GASTROENTEROLOGY › Diseases of the Digestive System, Latin American Medicine, TROPICAL Medicine
  • 8939

Lanfrank's "Science of Cirurgie." Edited from the Bodeian Ashmole MS. 1396 (ab. 1380 A.D.) and the British Museum Additional MS. 12, 056 (ab. 1420 A.D.) by Robert v. Fleischhacker.

London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co, 1894.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › England, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, SURGERY: General
  • 8940

De plantis libri XVI.

Florence: Georgio Marescotti, 1583.

Cesalpino developed the first scientific classification system for flowering plants.

"Unlike the "herbals" of that period, it contains no illustrations. The first section, including thirty pages of the work, is the part of most importance for botany in general. From the beginning of the 17th century up to the present day botanists have agreed in the opinion that Cesalpino in this work, in which he took Aristotle for his guide, laid the foundation of the morphology and physiology of plants and produced the first scientific classification of flowering plants. Three things, above all, give the book the stamp of individuality: the large number of original, acute observations, especially on flowers, fruits, and seeds, made, moreover, before the invention of the microscope, the selection of the organs of fructification for the foundation of his botanical system; finally, the ingenious and at the same time strictly philosophical handling of the rich material gathered by observation. Cesalpino issued a publication supplementary to this work, entitled Appendix ad libros de plantis et quaestiones peripateticas (1603).

"Cesalpino is also famous in the history of botany as one of the first botanists to make an herbarium; one of the oldest herbaria still in existence is that which he arranged about 1550–60 for Bishop Alfonso Tornabono. After many changes of fortune the herbarium is now in the Museo di Storia Naturale di Firenze at Florence. It consists of 260 folio pages arranged in three volumes bound in red leather, and contains 768 species of plants. A work of some value for chemistry, mineralogy, and geology was issued by him under the title De metallicis libri tres (Rome, 1596). Some of its matter recalls the discoveries made at the end of the eighteenth century, as those of Antoine Lavoisier and René Just Haüy, it also shows a correct understanding of fossils.

"The Franciscan monk Charles Plumier gave the name of Cæsalpinia to a plant genus and Linnaeus retained it in his system. At the present day this genus includes approximately 150 species and belongs family Fabaceae, subfamily Cæsalpinioideae, which contains a large number of useful plants. Linnaeus in his writings often quotes his great predecessor in the science of botany and praises Cesalpino in the following lines:

Quisquis hic exstiterit primos concedat honores
Casalpine Tibi primaque certa dabit.

Digital facsimile from the Biodiversity Heritage Library at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY, BOTANY › Classification / Systemization of Plants
  • 8941

Bibliographia Brasiliana: A bibliographical essay on rare books bout Brazil from 1504 to 1900 and works of Brazilian authors published abroad before the independence of Brazil in 1822. 2 vols.

Amsterdam & Rio De Janiero: Colbis Editora , 1958.

Includes early books on medicine and natural history of Brazil.



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Specific Subjects, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, Latin American Medicine
  • 8942

Die metallurgischen Krankheiten des Oberharzes.

Osterode, Germany: A. Sorge, 1851.

Brockmann's book on the pulmonary disease of miners, including black lung disease, was first book on occupational health published in Germany. Brockmann published a preliminary paper on the subject in 1845.
Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Germany, OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE › Miners' Diseases, PULMONOLOGY
  • 8943

Entomologia Parisiensis; sive, catalogus insectorum quae in agro Parisiensi reperiuntur; secondum methodum Geoffraeanam in sections, genera & species distributus; Cui addit sun nomina trivalia & sere recentae novae species.

Paris: Via et Aedibus Serpentineis, 1785.

In this work co-written with Geoffroy, Fourcroy presented a major contribution to the systemization of entomology. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, ZOOLOGY › Arthropoda › Entomology
  • 8944

Histoire des entomologistes français, 1750-1950. Édition entièrement revue et augmentée.

Paris: Boubée, 2004.

"The new edition of "Histoire des Entomologistes Français" is completely revised and expanded. The author has supplemented this work with five new biographies, a chapter on Agricultural Entomology, a list of the Society's Presidents since 1989, a list of the Society's Secretaries General, and added photographs from the Archives of The Society and amateur gifts, which were missing in the first edition. It comprises two main parts on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The main chapters of the work of J. Gouillard are the following: The foundation of the Entomological Society of France; French entomology in the nineteenth century (1832-1900); French Entomology in the 20th Century (1900-1950); Medical entomology; Tropical agricultural entomology; French palaeoentomology; Sericulture in France; Beekeeping in France; The ecology. There are also lists and indexes such as the classification of insects, arachnids and myriapods, a bibliography, a historical index of the French entomologists mentioned in the Annales et Bulletins of the Entomological Society of France (1832-1980)" (Publisher).



Subjects: ZOOLOGY › Arthropoda › Entomology, ZOOLOGY › History of Zoology
  • 8945

Brasilien-Bibliothek der Robert Bosch GmbH. 2 vols. in 3.

Stuttgart: Deutscher Verlags-Anstalt, 19831991.
"Vol. I, edited by Susanne Koppel, describes 684 works dating from the discovery of Brazil to the nineteenth century, on history, politics, literature, ethnology, geography, climate, botany, zoology and medicine. The entries are arranged chronologically, and for each Koppel gives collation, condition of the Bosch copy, extensive bibliography and comments. There are indexes by author, subject, place of publication, artist, provenance and Brazilian place name.
 
"Vol. II, part 1, edited by Renate Löschner and Birgit Kirchstein-Gamber, describes 236 sketches (of which 92 are illustrated) made during the 1815-1817 expedition of Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) to Brazil. The Prince was one of the most noted German travellers to describe the Americas. Borba de Moraes states that "from a scientific point of view this expedition was one of the most profitable of the nineteenth century" (II, 544); an account of it was published as Reise nach Brasilien, Frankfurt, 1820.
Vol. II, part 2, covering the correspondence and sketches of the 1815-1817 expedition, is beautifully illustrated with over 100 color plates, among them drawings of monkeys, birds, reptiles, frogs, a jellyfish, a wasp's nest, etc.  This volume was edited by Birgit Kirschstein-Gamber, Susanne Koppel and Renate Löschner, with an introduction by Dorothea Kuhn" (Richard Ramer).


Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Bibliographies of Natural History, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Brazil, NATURAL HISTORY › History of Natural History, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 8946

Catálogo das obras da colecção portuguesa anteriores a fundação das Regias Escolas de Cirurgia (1825). 2 vols.

Lisbon: Faculdade de Medicina de Lisboa, 1942.

(Thanks to Richard Ramer for this reference.)



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Institutional Medical Libraries, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Portugal
  • 8947

Catálogo da Bibliotheca da Escola Medico-Cirurgica do Porto.

Porto, Portugal: Typ. da Encyclopedia Portugueza Illustrada, 1910.

(Thanks to Richard Ramer for this reference.)



Subjects: BIBLIOGRAPHY › Catalogues of Institutional Medical Libraries, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Portugal
  • 8948

Observations sur la fièvre jaune, faites à Cadix, en 1819 par MM. Pariset et Mazet, docteurs en médecine de la Faculté de Paris, et rédigées par M. Pariset.

Paris: Audot, 1820.

Pariset and Mazet distinguished themselves combating an outbreak of yellow fever in Spain. Pariset's colleague was apparently not involved with publication of the book, and died in a yellow fever outbreak in Barcelona in 1821, very soon after the book's publication, as Pariset's dedication is dated December, 1820. Some copies have an inserted plate honoring his memory. This is probably the most elaborately produced, and strangely beautiful book on yellow fever published during the 19th century with 5 full-page hand-colored lithographs by le Comte de Lasteyrie, pioneer lithographer in France. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Spain, INFECTIOUS DISEASE › VECTOR-BORNE DISEASES › Mosquito-Borne Diseases › Yellow Fever, Illustration, Medical
  • 8949

Instrumental medico-quirurgico en la hispania romana.

Impressos Numancia, 1988.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Spain, INSTRUMENTS & TECHNOLOGIES › History of Biomedical Instrumentation
  • 8950

Medizin im römischen Österreich.

Linz, Austria: Linzer Archäologische Forschungen, 1998.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Austria
  • 8951

Aeliani de natura animalium libri septemdecim. Verba ad fidem librorum manuscriptorum constituit et annotationibus illustravit Fridericus Jacobs.

Jena: Frederic Frommann, 1832.

The first modern critical edition of the text, which collated medieval manuscripts against the previous printed editions. Digital facsimile of the 1832 edition from the Internet Archive at this link



Subjects: NATURAL HISTORY › Late Antiquity, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy, Zoology, Natural History, Ancient Greek / Roman / Egyptian
  • 8952

Ex Aeliani historia per Petrum Gyllium latini facti, itemque ex Porphyrio, Heliodoro, Oppiano: Tum eodem Gyllio luculentis accessionibus aucti libri XVI. De ui & natura animalium. Eiusdem Gyllij liber unus, de gallicis & latinis nominibus piscium.

Lyon: Sébastien Gryphe, 1533.

Editio princeps of Aelianus's late antique work on natural history. Along with Aelianus's text Gyllius included his own “Liber summarius de Gallicis et Latinis nominibus piscium Massiliensium” [Book on the French and Latin names of the fish of Marseilles], along with his translations of natural history texts by Heliodorus, Oppian and Porphyrius. Digital facsimile from the Hathi Trust at this link.



Subjects: NATURAL HISTORY › Late Antiquity, ZOOLOGY › Ichthyology, ZOOLOGY › Mammalogy, Zoology, Natural History, Ancient Greek / Roman / Egyptian
  • 8953

Canadensium plantarum, aliarúmque nondum editarum historia.

Paris: Simon le Moyne, 1635.

First description of the Canadian Flora. Cornut was a French botanist and physician who never visited North America, but instead received the majority of his plant specimens from the Robins family, who supervised the gardens of Henry IV, and the garden of the Paris Faculty of Medicine, and the Morin family, who owned several Parisian commercial nurseries. He described and illustrated over thirty species from eastern North America for the first time, as well as 5 bulbous plants from southern Africa. The plates in this work have been attributed to Pierre Vallet. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY, BOTANY › Botanical Gardens, BOTANY › Botanical Illustration, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Canada
  • 8954

Simon of Genoa's Medical Lexicon. Edited by Barbara Zipser.

Berlin: De Gruyter, 2013.

"Simon of Genoa's Medical Lexicon”, an edited volume based on the conference held on March 17th, 2012, is part of the Simon Online project – a dynamically growing Wiki edition of Simon of Genoa's Clavis sanationis, a Latin-Greek-Arabic medical dictionary from the late 13th century.... The volume demonstrates the importance of the Clavis, not only for the history of pharmacology and medicine, but also for Byzantine and medieval studies, Roman, Greek, Latin and Arabic philology and lexicography" (Publisher).



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 8955

Simon Online. Edited by Barbara Zipser.

2012.

http://www.simonofgenoa.org/index.php?title=Aims_of_the_project&oldid=12132

"Simon Online is a collaborative edition of Simon of Genoa's clavis sanationis, a medical dictionary from the late thirteenth century. More on Simon...

 

 



Subjects: DIGITAL RESOURCES › Digital Collaborations Online (Wikis), MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 8956

La presence des absens; ou facile moyen de rendre présent au médecin l'estat d'un malade absent. Dressé par les docteurs en médecine consultans charitablement à Paris pour les pauvres malades.

Paris: Au Bureau d'adresse, 1642.

Renaudot, physician, philanthropist and journalist, published this self-diagnostic handbook so that charity patients could communicate with their physicians by correspondence. Digital facsimile from biusante.paris.descartes at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, Medicine: General Works, Popularization of Medicine
  • 8957

Lexique des termes de botanique en latin.

Paris: C. Klincksieck, 1956.


Subjects: BOTANY › History of Botany, Dictionaries, Biomedical › Lexicography, Biomedical
  • 8958

Les noms de plantes dans la Rome antique.

Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1985.


Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Roman Empire › History of Medicine in the Roman Empire, BOTANY › History of Botany, Dictionaries, Biomedical › Lexicography, Biomedical
  • 8959

Le vocabulaire latin de l'anatomie.

Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1991.


Subjects: ANATOMY › History of Anatomy, Dictionaries, Biomedical › Lexicography, Biomedical
  • 8960

Dragon's brain perfume: An historical geography of camphor.

Leiden: Brill, 1999.

"In the Dragon's Brain Perfume (a Chinese description of Camphor) once more the existence and importance of world systems of exchange becomes clear. In the pre-industrial world aromatic substances have always counted among the most prominent items of long-distance trade. The finest camphor came from Malaya, Borneo and Sumatra, but long-distance trade took it to societies at the geographical poles of demand - China and the medieval West already in late Antiquity (ca. 6th century A.D.). In India it was in use at an even much earlier period.
The present monograph opens with a survey of aromata generally - origins, time and place of demand - from the Ancient Civilizations to the Age of Discoveries. Chapter two concerns the natural history of camphor; subsequent chapters are organized by regions (India, Western Asia, the medieval West, South East Asia, China and Japan), with a postscript on Origins and Diffusion.
Evidence is drawn from an extensive range of sources in natural and cultural history.The work includes 15 original maps, 28 illustrations, and an extensive bibliography" (publisher).



Subjects: Geography of Disease / Health Geography › History of Geography of Disease, PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals
  • 8961

Lithotherapie: Historische Studien über die medizinische Verwendung der Edelsteine.

Berlin: S. Calvary & Co., 1902.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: Minerals and Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines › History of Materia Medica
  • 8962

Mittelalterliche Pharmazie und Medizin. Dargestellt an Geschichte und Inhalt des ANTIDOTARIUM NICOLAI. By D. Goltz.

Stuttgart: Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft, 1976.


Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines › History of Materia Medica
  • 8963

Botanik der spaeteren Griechen vom dritten bis dreizehnten Jahrhuntert.

Berlin: F. Berggold, 1866.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece › History of Ancient Medicine in Greece, BOTANY › History of Botany, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › History of Medieval Medicine
  • 8964

Birds in the ancient world.

Routledge, 2012.


Subjects: ZOOLOGY › History of Zoology, ZOOLOGY › Ornithology
  • 8965

Geschichte der Botanik. 4 vols.

Königsberg, 18541857.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › History of Botany
  • 8966

Alexander von Tralles. Original-Text und Übersetzung nebst einer einleitenden Abhandlung. Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der Medicin. 2 vols.

Vienna: Wilhelm Braumüller, 18781879.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Late Antiquity, BYZANTINE MEDICINE, PARASITOLOGY
  • 8967

Garioponti Vetusti admodum medici ad totius corporis aegritudines remediorum praxeōn libri V. Eiusdem de febribus, atque earum symptomatis libri ii. Recens typis commissi, & multis in locis suae integritati restituti.

Basel: Henricus Petrus, 1531.

Digital facsimile from Bayerische StaatsBibliothek at this link.



Subjects: MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy, MEDIEVAL MEDICINE › Italy › Schola Medica Salernitana
  • 8968

Physici et medici Graeci minores. Congressit, ad fidem codd. mss. praesertim eorum, quos beatus Diezius contulerat, veterumque editionum partim emendavit partim nunc prima vice edidit, commentariis criticis indicibusque tam rerum quam verborum instruxit. Edited by Julius Ludwig Ideler. 2 vols.

Berlin: G. Reimer, 1841.

Includes texts of the following authors:  Abitianus, Actuarius, Johannes, Alexander, of Aphrodisias, Andromachus (Senior), Apollonius, Dyscolus, 2nd cent, Archelaus (philosophus), Cassius (Iatrosophistes), Hermes, Trismegistus, Hierophilus (Sophistes), Hierotheus, Marcellus Sidetes, Maximus Planudae, Mercurius, Cyrus, Palladius Alexandrinus, Psellus, Michael, Soranus, of Ephesus, Sotion, Stephanus (Alexandrinus), Symeon Magister, Theophrastus, Theophylactus Simocatta, Xenocrates Aphrodisiensis. Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › Greece, BYZANTINE MEDICINE, Compilations and Anthologies of Medicine
  • 8969

Animals in the ancient world from A to Z.

New York: Routledge, 2013.

"Animals were integral to ancient commerce, war, love, literature and art. Inside the city they were found as pets, pests, and parasites. They could be sacred, sacrificed, liminal, workers, or intruders from the wild. Beyond the city domesticated animals were herded and bred for profit and wild animals were hunted for pleasure and gain alike. Specialists like Aristotle, Aelian, Pliny and Seneca studied their anatomy and behavior. Geographers and travelers described new lands in terms of their animals. Animals are to be seen on every possible artistic medium, woven into cloth and inlaid into furniture. They are the subject of proverbs, oaths and dreams. Magicians, physicians and lovers turned to animals and their parts for their crafts. They paraded before kings, inhabited palaces, and entertained the poor in the arena" (Publisher).

 



Subjects: ZOOLOGY › History of Zoology
  • 8970

Kystophotographischer Atlas.

Wiesbaden: J. F. Bergmann, 1894.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: IMAGING › Photography / Photomicrography , UROLOGY
  • 8971

Colección de medicamentos indigenas y sus aplicaciones, estraidos de los reinos vegetal, mineral y animal, recogidos y anotados por [...], segunda edición corregida y aumentada.

Caracas, Venezuela: George Corser, 1860.

Digital facsimile of the 5th edition (1875) from the National Library of Medicine, Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY › Ethnobotany, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Venezuela, Latin American Medicine, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 8972

Air and rain. The beginnings of a chemical climatology.

London: Longmans, Green & Co., 1872.

In this work on the industrial causes of pollution Smith coined the term acid rain

"The corrosive effect of polluted, acidic city air on limestone and marble was noted in the 17th century by John Evelyn, who remarked upon the poor condition of the Arundel marbles.[2] Since the Industrial Revolution, emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides into the atmosphere have increased.[3][4] In 1852, Robert Angus Smith was the first to show the relationship between acid rain and atmospheric pollution in ManchesterEngland.[5]

"Though acidic rain was discovered in 1853, it was not until the late 1960s that scientists began widely observing and studying the phenomenon.[6] The term "acid rain" was coined in 1872 by Robert Angus Smith.[7]"  (Wikipedia). 

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BIOLOGY › Ecology / Environment, Environmental Science & Health, OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE
  • 8973

Vulgariser la medecine: Du style medical en France et en Italie (XVIe et XVIIe siecles). Edited by Andrea Carlino and Michel Jeanneret.

Paris: Librairie Droz, 2009.


Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › France, Popularization of Medicine
  • 8974

Garci da Orta: Colloquies on the simples & drugs of India. New edition (Lisbon, 1895) edited and annotated by the Conde de Ficalho. Translated with an introduction and index by Sir Clements Markham.

London: Henry Sotheran and Co., 1913.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: ANCIENT MEDICINE › India › History of Ancient Medicine in India, BOTANY › Ethnobotany, PHARMACOLOGY › PHARMACEUTICALS › Materia medica / Herbals / Herbal Medicines
  • 8975

The muscles and their story, from the earliest times: Including the whole text of Mercurialis, and the opinions of other writers, ancient and modern, on mental and bodily development. By John F. W. Blundell.

Chapman & Hall, 1864.

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: PHYSICAL MEDICINE / REHABILITATION › Exercise / Training / Fitness, PHYSICAL MEDICINE / REHABILITATION › Exercise / Training / Fitness › History of Exercise / Training / Fitness, Sports Medicine
  • 8976

The natural & moral history of Indies, by Father Joseph de Acosta. Reprinted from the English translated edition of Edward Grimston, 1604. And edited, with notes and an introduction by Clements R. Markham. Vol. 1: The natural history. Vol. 2: The moral history. 2 vols.

London: Printed for the Hakluyt Society, 1880.

Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Latin America, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Mexico, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Peru, NATURAL HISTORY, VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 8977

The British Pharmacopoeia, 1864 to 2014: Medicines, international standards and the state.

London: Routledge, 2016.

"The British Pharmacopoeia has provided official standards for the quality of substances, medicinal products and articles used in medicine since its first publication in 1864. It is used in over 100 countries and remains an essential global reference in pharmaceutical research and development and quality control. This book explores how these standards have been achieved through a comprehensive review of the history and development of the pharmacopoeias in the UK, from the early London, Edinburgh and Dublin national pharmacopoeias to the creation of the British Pharmacopoeia and its evolution over 150 years. Trade in medicinal substances and products has always been global, and the British Pharmacopoeia is placed in its global context as an instrument of the British Empire as it first sought to cover the needs of countries such as India and latterly as part of its role in international harmonisation of standards in Europe and elsewhere. The changing contents of the pharmacopoeias over this period reflect the changes in medical practice and the development of dosage forms from products dispensed by pharmacists to commercially manufactured products, from tinctures to the latest monoclonal antibody products" (Publisher).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › England (United Kingdom), PHARMACOLOGY › History of Pharmacology & Pharmaceuticals, PHARMACOLOGY › Pharmacopeias
  • 8978

Physiologus. Ed. F. Sbordóne.

Milan: In aedibus Societatis, 1936.

Physiologus, a didactic Christian text, is thought to have been written or compiled in Greek by an unknown author in Alexandria, 200-275 CE. It describes a "hodgepodge" of animals, real and imaginery, with the fig tree and a few stones with "remarkable" properties thrown in. The Physiologus is distinguished from Aelian's compilation by the presence of explicit Christological interpretations of the lion, the pelican, and other animals. Francesco Sbordone's edition, based on the collation of 77 Greek manuscripts, established three traditions in the surviving manuscripts of the text: a "primitive" tradition, a Byzantine tradition and a pseudo-Basil (Syriac) tradition. Morgan codex 397, an illuminated Greek codex from Grottaferrata, has since been established as the earliest surviving Greek text of Physiologus.



Subjects: Medieval Zoology, NATURAL HISTORY › Late Antiquity
  • 8979

Physiologus de naturis duodecim animalium.

Augsburg: Anton Sorg, 1482.

The earliest printed edition (circa 1482) of the Physiologus, a Christological natural historical work that originated in Late Antiquity, and remained popular through the Middle Ages. This edition, which was very widely used as a school text, sometimes provided with a commentary, during the Middle Ages, was attributed to a bishop Theobaldus, who may have been Abbot of Montecassino from 1022-1035. ISTC No. it00142000.

English translation: Physiologus: A metrical bestiary of twelve chapters by Bishop Theobald printed in Cologne 1492. Translated by Alan Wood Rendell. London: John & Edward Bumpus, Ltd., 1928. Digital facsimile from Bestiary.ca at this link. The Theobaldus version was retranslated and edited by P. T. Eden as Theobaldi "Physiologus" (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1972).



Subjects: Medieval Zoology, NATURAL HISTORY › Late Antiquity
  • 8980

Early recollections and life of Dr. James Still.

Philadelphia: Printed for the Author by J. B. Lippincott & Co., 1877.

Still's autobiography is probably the first biography or autobiography of an African American physician.

"James Still, medical doctor and herbalist, was born on April 9, 1812 in Burlington County, New Jersey.  Still was born to Levin and Charity Still, two former slaves living in the Pine Barrens to avoid being captured and sold back into slavery. Although the Still family was poor, the children attended school periodically and had some of their own textbooks, such as the New Testament and a spelling book.  When Still was three years old, a Dr. Fort, a Philadelphia physician, came to the Pines to vaccinate the children. His visit was the spark of inspiration that led to Still’s desire to be a doctor.

"Just before Still turned 18 he was voluntarily hired out as an indentured servant by his father. During the three years of his servitude, Still read everything available about medicine and botany, and learned all he could from the Native Americans of the area. On his twenty-first birthday, he was released from his service, given $10.00 and a new suit. He left immediately for Philadelphia. Still’s racial and financial status prevented him from attending medical school. Nonetheless, he continued to gain medical knowledge, reading everything he could find while working menial jobs to support himself.  

"In the spring of 1835, Still met Angelina Willow. The two were married on July 25 of that year and had a girl, Beulah. Angelina died from tuberculosis in August of 1838 and Beulah died in August of the following year. Still quickly remarried Henrietta Thomas and the two of them had two sons, James and Joseph.

"Still’s medical career began soon after his second marriage.  He created a “cough balm” from plants and herbs grown on his farm and soon after his first patient used it successfully Still became famous.  Two Philadelphia pharmacists heard of his product and began buying all of the cough balm he could supply. With that money he was able to buy a small house and begin making house-calls to patients.

"In response to his success, local doctors challenged his medical credentials. Still consulted a local attorney and learned that he was safe from legal action as long as he continued to never claim to be an MD, nor ask for a fee for his services.

"James Still eventually suffered a stroke, limiting his practice to patients who came to his home. In 1877, he published his autobiography, Early Recollections and Life of Dr. James Still in which he detailed the memories of his life. Five years later, in 1882 James Still died of a second stroke at his New Jersey home" (http://www.blackpast.org/aah/still-james-1812-1882), accessed 02-2017).  

Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: AFRICAN AMERICANS & MEDICINE & BIOLOGY, BIOGRAPHY (Reference Works) › Autobiography
  • 8981

Soyer's culinary campaign. Being historical reminiscences of the late war. With the plain art of cookery for military and civil institutions, the army, navy, public, etc., etc.

London & New York: G. Routledge, 1857.

During the Crimean War, Soyer, probably the most famous English celebrity chef of his time, joined the troups at his own expense to advise the army on cooking and diet. "Later he was paid his expenses and wages equivalent to those of a Brigadier-General. He reorganized the provisioning of the army hospitals. He designed his own field stove, the Soyer Stove, and trained and installed in every regiment the "Regimental cook" so that soldiers would get an adequate meal and not suffer from malnutrition or die of food poisoning. He wrote A Culinary Campaign as a record of his activities in the Crimea. Catering standards within the British Army would remain inconsistent, however, and there would not be a single Army Catering Corps until 1945. This is now part of the Royal Logistics Corps, whose catering HQ is called Soyer's House. His stove, or adaptions of it, remained in British military service into the late 20th century" (Wikipedia) Digital facsimile from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › Crimean War, NUTRITION / DIET
  • 8982

Les observations de plusieurs singularitez et choses memorables, trouuées en Grece, Asie, Iudée, Egypte, Arabie, & autres pays estranges, redigées en trois livres.

Paris: Gilles Corrozet, 1553.

Belon was first trained as an apothecary, and worked in that capacity for the bishop of Clermont, Guillaume Duprat. Around 1542 he studied medicine In Paris, and obtained a licentiate in medicine, though he never took the formal degree of doctor. With the recommendation of Duprat, he became an apothecary to Cardinal François de Tournon. Under this patronage, he was able to undertake extensive scientific voyages and travels. Beginning in 1546, he travelled through Greece, Crete, Asia Minor, Egypt, Arabia and Palestine, and returned in 1549. He hoped to find the remains of Homer's Troy in the Levant. His Observations, an account of these travels, included numerous woodcut illustrations. Digital facsimile of the 1553 edition from the Internet Archive at this link. Translated into English by James Hogarth as Travels in the Levant: The observations of Pierre Belon of Le Mans on many singularities and memorable things found in Greece, Turkey, Judaea (2012).



Subjects: COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Greece , COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Israel, COUNTRIES, CONTINENTS AND REGIONS › Middle East, NATURAL HISTORY › Illustration, VOYAGES & Travels by Physicians, Surgeons & Scientists
  • 8983

De arboribus coniferis, resiniferis, aliis quoque nonnullis sempiterna fronde virentibus, cum earundem iconibus ad viuum expressis. Item de melle cedrino, cedria, agarico, resinis, & iis quae ex coniferis proficiscuntur.

Paris: apud benedictum Prevost, 1553.

One of the first treatises on conifers and other evergreen plants. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: BOTANY, BOTANY › Botanical Illustration, BOTANY › Dendrology
  • 8984

Les remonstrances sur le default du labour et culture des plantes, et de la cognoissance d'icelles, contenant la maniere d'affranchir et appriuoiser les arbres sauuages.

Paris: Gilles Corrozet, 1558.

The first work on agriculture written in French. As an apothecary, Belon was especially interested in the pharmaceutical value of plants. Having learned about them on his travels, he introduced numerous foreign plants into France, including the tree of Judeacork oakpistachiocedarjujube, and green oakeastern juniper, and myrtle. Except for a portrait of Belon, this relatively brief work is unillustrated. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: Agriculture / Horticulture, BOTANY, BOTANY › Dendrology, BOTANY › Medical Botany
  • 8985

How everyday products make people sick: Toxins at home and in the workplace.

Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2007.

An eloquent historical approach, written for a semi-popular audience, to everyday problems in occupational medicine and toxicology.



Subjects: OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE , OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE › History of Occupational Health & Medicine, PUBLIC HEALTH, TOXICOLOGY, TOXICOLOGY › History of Toxicology
  • 8986

Fake silk: The lethal history of viscose rayon.

New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2016.


Subjects: OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & MEDICINE › History of Occupational Health & Medicine
  • 8987

De habitu et constitutione corporis, quam Greci χρασιν, triviales complexionem vocant, libri duo.

Antwerp: apud Guilielmum Simonem, 1561.

One of the earliest self-help medical guides, written by a pupil of Vesalius. Translated into English by Thomas Newton as The touchstone of complexions generallye appliable, expedient and profitable for all such, as be desirous & carefull of their bodylye health: Contayning most easie rules & ready tokens, whereby euery one may perfectly try, and throughly know, as well the exacte state, habite, disposition, and constitution, of his owne body outwardly : as also the inclinations, affections, motions, & desires of his mynd inwardly / first written in Latine, by Leuine Lemnie (London,1576). Digital facsimile of the 1561 edition from Google Books at this link. The English text is available from Early English Books Online at this link.



Subjects: Household or Self-Help Medicine
  • 8988

Evolutionary biology and the treatment of signs and symptoms of infectious disease.

J. Theor. Biol. 86 (1) 169–76., 1980.

"When viewed from an evolutionary perspective, manifestations of infectious diseases can be classified as (1) adaptations of the host to counteract harmful aspects of the disease, (2) adaptations of the pathogen to manipulate the host, or (3) “side effects” of the disease that do not serve adaptive functions for either the host or the pathogen. Although the functions of most manifestations are not known, support or rejection of these hypotheses should be readily derivable in many cases from analyses of existing data and relatively simple experiments. This approach should lead to improved medical treatment because preferred treatment depends on assessment of the validity of the three explanations. As an illustration, this perspective and its consequences for therapy are analyzed for fever, rhinorrhea and diarrhea" (Abstract).



Subjects: EVOLUTION › Evolutionary Medicine, INFECTIOUS DISEASE
  • 8989

Evolution of infectious disease.

New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.


Subjects: EVOLUTION › Evolutionary Medicine, INFECTIOUS DISEASE
  • 8990

The dawn of Darwinian medicine.

Q. Rev. Biol. 66 (1) 1–22., 1991.


Subjects: EVOLUTION › Evolutionary Medicine
  • 8991

Why we get sick: The new science of Darwinian medicine.

New York: Times Books, 1994.


Subjects: EVOLUTION › Evolutionary Medicine
  • 8992

Adaptation and natural selection: A Critique of some current evolutionary thought.

Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1966.


Subjects: BIOLOGY, EVOLUTION
  • 8993

Darwin's century: Evolution and the men who discovered it.

New York: Doubleday, 1958.

An elegantly written and profound book that was a powerful influence to my own intellectual development when I read it in 1958; it also a great inspiration for me to study the history of evolution and biology.

"Eiseley documented that animal variation, extinction, and a lengthy history of the earth were observed from the 1600s onward. Scientists groped towards a theory with increasingly detailed observations. They became aware that evolution had occurred without knowing how. Evolution was "in the air" and part of the intellectual discourse both before and after On the Origin of Species was published. The publisher describes it thus: "At the heart of the account is Charles Darwin, but the story neither begins nor ends with him. Starting with the seventeenth-century notion of the Great Chain of Being, Dr. Eiseley traces the achievements and discoveries of men in many fields of science who paved the way for Darwin; and the book concludes with an extensive discussion of the ways in which Darwin's work has been challenged, improved upon, and occasionally refuted during the past hundred years."[14]

"Persons whose contributions are discussed include Sir Thomas BrowneSir Francis BaconCarl LinnaeusBenoît de Maillet, the Comte de BuffonErasmus DarwinLouis AgassizJean-Baptiste LamarckJames HuttonWilliam SmithGeorges CuvierÉtienne Geoffroy Saint-HilaireSir Charles LyellThomas Robert MalthusWilliam WellsPatrick MatthewKarl von BaerRobert ChambersThomas Henry HuxleySir John RichardsonAlexander HumboldtGregor MendelHugo De VriesW. L. JohannsenLambert Quételet, and Alfred Russel Wallace. Critics discussed include Fleeming JenkinA.W. BennettLord Kelvin, and Adam Sedgwick, both a mentor and a critic.15]" (Wikipedia).

 



Subjects: EVOLUTION › History of Evolutionary Thought
  • 8994

The female spy of the union army. The thrilling adventures, experiences, and escapes of a woman nurse, spy, and scout, in hospitals, camps and battlefields.

Hartford, CT: W. S. Williams & Co., 1864.

Digital facsimile of a reprint of the 1864 edition from the Internet Archive at this link. Reissued in 1865 as Nurse and spy in the Union Army: Containing the adventures and experience of a woman in hospitals, camps, and battle-fields. Digital facsimile of the 1865 version from the Internet Archive at this link.



Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE, NURSING, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1800 - 1899
  • 8995

Pride of America, we're with you: The letters of Grace Anderson, U.S. Army Nurse Corps, World War I.

Seaboard Press, 2007.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I, NURSING › History of Nursing, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 2000 -
  • 8996

My story of the war: The Civil War memories of the famous nurse, relief organizer and suffragette.

Hartford, CT: A. D. Worthington & Company, 1888.


Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE, NURSING, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1800 - 1899
  • 8997

Nurse writers of the great war.

Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016.


Subjects: MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › History of Military Medicine, MILITARY MEDICINE & HYGIENE › World War I, NURSING › History of Nursing, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999
  • 8998

Hospital days.

New York: D. Van Nostrand, 1868.

Woolsey participated in the first meetings of the Women's Central Relief Association, which preceded the U.S. Sanitary Commission. In 1863 she became Superintendent of Nurses at Fairfax Seminary Hospital, and served there until the end of the American Civil War. Digital facsimile from Google Books at this link.



Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE, HOSPITALS, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1800 - 1899
  • 8999

Civil war nurse: The diary and letters of Hannah Ropes. Edited with an introduction and commentary by John R. Brumgardt.

Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 1980.


Subjects: American (U.S.) CIVIL WAR MEDICINE, NURSING, WOMEN in Medicine & the Life Sciences, Publications About, WOMEN, Publications by › Years 1900 - 1999